Customer Reviews for

Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2013

    Emily Bazelon has made a career of churning out very highly bias

    Emily Bazelon has made a career of churning out very highly biased and poorly researched material. Her coverage of the Phoebe Prince case in South Hadley, Massachusetts bordered on slander and harassment. It is astonishing that Bazelon isn't facing HIPAA charges for spilling out stolen medical records onto the internet. To further elaborate on this point, unless the permission of the parents is given it is unlawful to print private medical data. Bazelon gleefully printed it regardless. She received said medical data from someone inside the school who had access to Pheoebe's records. If this was not bad enough she boasted about it in later articles. Emily Bazelon's modus operandi is to begin a project with the conclusion already decided and then selectively choose certain facts and then weave a story around then to meet the facts. Here's an example, Bazelon, in her first article on the Prince case referred to Sean Mulveyhill, one of the formerly accused bullies, as a "tragic hero" while simultaneously slandering Phoebe Prince using the kind of harsh pejorative and accusatory rhetoric only seen in confrontational political ads. As it has come to be known sometime later, Mr. Mulveyhill was the pricipal architect behind the cooperative bullying effort. There were also rumors that he had plied a victim with GHB. If Bazelon considers this guy to be a tragic hero then she obviously rewards cruelty. If you want an example of good journalism steer clear of anything written by Bazelon and read the works of Kevin Cullen for unbiased and complete journalism. The best use of this book would be to remove its pages and use them to house train your dog. The cover might make a good shim if you have a table with one of the leg shorter than the others..

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2013

    Stick and Stones is a poorly researched book based on the author

    Stick and Stones is a poorly researched book based on the author's opinions not the facts. What a dissappointment!

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    Emily Bazelon is an unethical and onprofessional writer who fill

    Emily Bazelon is an unethical and onprofessional writer who fills her section about Phoebe Prince with not only biased and twisted fact but outright falsehoods. She ignored key aspects of the bullying campaign waged against Phoebe Prince to create a piece defending the kids who bullied Phoebe literally to death. She claims there was no "bullying." She apparently believes that physical assaults, verbal assaults, stalking via cell phone and text, and gang-raping Phoebe do not constitute bullying. Bazelon is as sociopathic and narcissistic as the kids who bullied Phoebe to death. Hey Emily, Phoebe was raped by these kids. Did you forget to talk about that. That's why she took an overdose of pills 6 weeks before she died.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2013

    Excellent, well-researched, and well-written book on an extremel

    Excellent, well-researched, and well-written book on an extremely timely topic. The author tells a compelling narrative, weaving in a ton of interesting sociological and psychological research. I would definitely recommend for parents, kids, teachers, and counselors - anything thinking about or struggling with the issue of bullying today. Don't write the book off if you don't fall into one of those categories, though - it has a lot to say about growing up in general, and I think would be interesting for anyone who appreciates well-researched, narrative nonfiction.. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    The book is written by a journalist, Emily Bazelon,  who is





    The book is written by a journalist, Emily Bazelon,  who is very passionate about the issues of bullying in American schools.  She  makes her own research into the three different stories of teenagers who became the victims of bullying. In the first story about Monique, Bazelon tries to draw attention to the negligence of adults, namely, the school and local district authorities of the fate of a seventh-grader  who suffers from systematic assults from her peers. The second part of the book tells the story of a homosexual boy, Jabob. Bazelon focuses on the cruelty of school children towards  children who don`t conform to the “normal” definition of gendder. In this chapter, the author also brings up another  incident of the LGBT bullying that turned out to initiate the anti-bulling law that has been adopted by most states. The last chapter  looks into the story of Phoebe, the victim of a notorious bullying case of a teenager who commited suicide arguably as a result of bullying. Here Bazelon discusses the most contradictory topics of suicide as a cause of bullying, the relevancy of court decisions and the gravity of cyberbullying. Moreover, Bazelon meets the Facebook employees to find out what social networks do to prevent bullying. Overall, the book is a very valuable source  of different aspects and perspectives on bullying.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    As a foreign student from Malaysia, I think that this book reall

    As a foreign student from Malaysia, I think that this book really helps me to know more about bullying here in the United States. Besides that, I’m a teacher-to-be and this book gives me a lot of information about bullying that might help me in the future. It is interesting because it has so many real scenarios as the references. It has the real dialogues of what was happening in the social environment which students faced almost every day.  In fact it is happening 24/7 with the cyber-bullying having mean words and videos that will spread easily and stay on the internet. I think that everyone should read this book especially people who are handling children in the present or in the future.  The first three chapters about Monique, Jacob and Phoebe are fascinating. All of the three were true stories and make me want to know more about these three people and what happened to them after the tragedy.  Bullying may sound worthless nowadays but we want to make a safe environment for students to study. Who likes being kicked, called names, and punched or any other bullying actions? No one! So first, take a simple step. Read this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    I read this book because one of my courses used the book as a te

    I read this book because one of my courses used the book as a text book for the class. Before I read this book, I thought it would be boring. After a few chapters, my perception about this book changed; this is not the typical book about bullying. I know about bullying in my country, Malaysia, but I don’t know much about bullying in America. The title of the book also brought a heavy meaning and if I didn’t read the description below the title, I wouldn’t know if this book tells about bullying. Throughout the reading, I was so surprised with the story that the writer got. There was three stories in the book which one is a young girl who get bullied in eigth grade, a boy who is bullied because he is gay and the last one that very tragic case is a suicide of Phoebe Prince. These three cases really opened my eyes about bullying and how bad it can be. All these cases happened in school which is supposed to be one of the safest place for children. Emily Bazelon put three strong example that shows bullying is a very bad and unacceptable problem. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2013

    Excellent book

    Much needed insight and perspective. This is such a complex and difficult topic where the answers are never as simple as one might hope.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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