Customer Reviews for

Sticky Fingers

Average Rating 3
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  • Posted April 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Totally Enjoyed this book!!

    I enjoyed this so much, I read it in one night. The second book in the Roxie Abruzzo Mysteries ( after Our Lady of Immaculate Deception, re-released as Foxy Roxy) was a page turner from beginning to end. Roxie has turned over a new leaf in her personal life but her professional life is a little flat. Her Uncle Carmine, a low level Pittsburgh mob boss, has approached her through his geeky lawyer, Marvin, to kidnap an old classmate of Roxie's. She is desperate for money, but not that much, and says no. She even goes to see her former nemesis, Clarice Crabtree, to warn her. Clarice is still a mean girl however, and Roxie leaves without delivering the warning. While she is at Clarice's house, Clarice disappears and Roxie is smack in the middle of another mess. She ends up identifying the body when Clarice is fished out of the river, and decides she needs to investigate to keep herself out of jail. Roxie is nothing if not tenacious and she keeps one step ahead of the police while figuring out whodunit. The book has stolen cars, bratty teenagers, a vengeful stalker with a spray paint can, and a large mastadon bone to peak your interest.



    This book reminded me of the early Stephanie Plum books. Set in a similar setting ( Pittsburgh vs Trenton), both featuring a single woman working in a man's profession ( salvage yard vs bail bond tracer), and having interesting side kicks ( Nooch vs Lula), the books are different enough that you can still enjoy them. Roxie is tough and has a teenage daughter Sage, who lives with Roxie's aunt. Roxie has a love-hate relationship with Sage's father and lots of unresolved feelings about him which get more complicated as the book goes on. Roxie does sometimes behave in an unlikeable way but the character remains sympathetic.


    I recommend reading the first book before this one because it sets up the history of Roxie's life and some of the other characters as well. You don't have to, but I think it will make this book more enjoyable. I also suggest you read Ms. Martin's other series- the Blackbird Sisters mysteries which also take place in PA and feature Michael Abruzzo, Roxie's cousin, as a recurring character.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2012

    E

    I enjoyed the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2012

    I loved this charmer of a book. It earned rave reviews from prof

    I loved this charmer of a book. It earned rave reviews from professionals in the industry and for good reason. The writing is smooth and Roxie is a fresh, appealing character who is caught up in unusual circumstances. Highly recommended.

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  • Posted March 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Quick and fun with a large touch of deja vu

    Roxy Abruzzo runs an architectural salvage business by day, but picks up jobs from her incarcerated mob boss uncle to make ends meet. She doesn't mind collecting gambling debts but she draws the line at kidnapping one of her old schoolmates, Clarice Crabtree.

    When Clarice turns up murdered, Roxy is on the trail of the killer, in part to prove that she isn't the murderer. Roxy soon discovers that Crabtree had two separate families and was the major breadwinner for both, something that wouldn't have been possible to afford even with her lofty museum job. Roxy's search leads her to a dinosaur bone collecting rock star and a small army of other zany characters.

    Halfway through STICKY FINGERS, I had to go to Google to see if Nancy Martin is a pseudonym for Janet Evanovich. (She's not.) The parallels between Roxy and Evanovich's Stephanie Plum are uncanny.

    Instead of Lulu, Roxy's sidekick is Nooch, a big lovable guy who's a little slow; instead of feisty Grandma Mazur, Roxy has Sister Bob, a retired nun looking to spend her golden years discovering sex. Just like Stephanie, Roxy has commitment problems even though Martin takes it a little further and has given her character the persona of a sex addict. Like Stephanie plum who can't stand next to Morelli or Ranger without her pulse increasing, Roxy's sexual attraction to her high school boyfriend (and the father of her daughter Sage) pulsates off the page. The similarities don't end with the characters; even the writing style and one-liners will have you thinking you're reading Evanovich.

    STICKY FINGERS is a quick fun read, but I can't help but wonder if Janet Evanovich is flattered or alarmed that Nancy Martin has so closely followed in her footsteps. Lynn Kimmerle

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  • Posted March 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Roxy's Back and Trouble Isn't Far Behind

    Roxy Abruzzo tries to stay as far away from her Uncle Carmine and his boys as possible...after all, she's got a daughter to raise and a business to run, and the mob is no place for either. Trouble is, the salvage business isn't great these days so she's done a job or two for her Uncle. Nothing big...until she gets word he wants her to kidnap someone; Clarice Crabtree. Roxy turns the job down flat and decides to warn the intended victim, even though she happens to be an old nemesis from high school. True to form, Roxy ends up arguing with Clarice, who stomps out the door and promptly disappears. Suddenly, Roxy's problems multiply faster than rabbits in the springtime.
    Nancy Martin's characters are well fleshed out...quirky, fun, and sometimes dangerous. She has a knack for making the reader feel like part of the neighborhood. We want to ride shotgun with Roxy and her sidekicks Nooch & Rooney, feast on Aunt Loretta's cookies, and sing backup for The Doonce, all while finding out just who killed Clarice. Great read...either on paper on the nook. And check out the first in the series, Foxy Roxy if you haven't already. Rooney will be waiting.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    fans will relish the second Abruzzo amateur sleuth mystery

    Through his intermediary, naive attorney Marvin Weiss, incarcerated gangster Uncle Carmine asks his niece Roxy Abruzzo to kidnap her former high school classmate museum curator Clarice Crabtree. Roxy declines to abduct the snotty snob. Though she does odd jobs for her behind bars mob boss relative to pay her bills, the architectural salvage consultant prefers to stay out of jail as a snatch is a felon; besides Roxy is raising her daughter Sage who is entering college soon.

    A few days after her declination, Pittsburgh Police Detective Bug Duffy escorts Roxy to a homicide scene. A corpse has been fished out of the Ohio. She identifies the victim as Clarice. Unable to resist, Roxy investigates as she assumes her uncle hired someone else to take care of Crabtree. Having her back is kindhearted man-mountain Nooch Santonucci and Rooney the dog.

    Containing her sex addiction while trying to be a model for Sage and struggling with how to deal with the father of her daughter chef Patrick Flynn as well as her mob-infested family, Foxy Roxy makes for a zany Pittsburgh crime thriller. The unusual story line is fast-paced from the moment Weiss offers Roxy employment and though over the top of The Point, fans will relish the second Abruzzo amateur sleuth (see Our Lady of Immaculate Deception) as nothing seems to go right for the foxy heroine.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted May 7, 2011

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    Posted May 20, 2011

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    Posted September 13, 2012

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