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Customer Reviews for

Stone's Fall

Average Rating 4
( 56 )
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5 Star

(30)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted September 21, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    "Stone's Fall" is literal.

    Ian Pears' seems to like the idea that nothing is ever the same when viewed from the differing perspectives of the narrators who made up his cast of characters. He has done this before in "An Instance of the Fingerpost" and my favorite, "The Dream of Scipio". In this one, the narrators move back in time to the origin of one of the central characters. Each narrator has a point of view based on his own knowledge of the situation. Certainly will keep you reading to the end of the mystery. The language is very much in keeping with the Victorian era in which the book is set. Very proper and very wordy, but intriguing.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 30, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Read

    a very well written book with an amazing group of characters. Amazingly intricate detail but not to the point that it is boring... highly recomend!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Intricate plot with unexpected twist!

    At times I wanted to give up on this book--there are so many characters, so many twists, and some of the "financial information" was tedious at times. However, I'm very glad I stuck with it, because the final twist literally made me gasp out loud. I still think I understand only 98% of what happened, but no matter. It was entertaining and fun.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    Painless history and unusual character studies which further reveal the times

    This author continues to illuminate different periods of time and place (here early 20th century England and Europe) with amazing plot twists and story lines. Always approaches things intelligently with the history as background but essential to understanding what's going on with the characters and plot.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2014

    One of the best i ever red, fascinating!

    If I could I would rate it as six stars. It has great language, fantastic plot, and a deep and rich psychological insight. I still cannot believe that a book focusing on business, finances, and industrial development can be breath taking and so positive. And, Pears is a master creator of the characters.
    Must read great piece of literature.

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  • Posted June 6, 2014

    Avoid at all costs!

    I was extraordinarily disappointed in this book, since Mr. Pears has a rather inflated reputation. But Stone's Fall retells essentially the same story from three different viewpoints, is loaded with long, boring, and completely irrelevant descriptive passages, and concludes with a totally bizarre explanation. You come away from this book feeling that you have wasted a great deal of time reading a badly written book, with a strange plot, and an even odder conclusion.

    Howardeagle

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Zoeh

    "_"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    KENS' STORY: CHAPTER 29

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  • Posted June 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This story is told by three narrators in different times and pla

    This story is told by three narrators in different times and places who come together at various times in their lives even if unbeknownst to some when they do. It is, in a way, an interesting puzzle to be solved, with the reader finding out where the pieces may fall, sometimes before or just as the characters themselves do.

    The book begins in May 1953 in Paris with the funeral of Madame Robillard, who, we learn later is one of the main characters in the story. This part of the book is told from the viewpoint of Matthew Braddock, a journalist and BBC news reporter, who was in Paris for a final business trip prior to his retirement. He had not realized she was still alive, and just happened to learn of her death by reading the newspaper. After the funeral service, Braddock is approached by one of Madame Robillard's solicitors, and eventually given documents left for him by Henry Cort when he died. A stipulation was that the documents were not to be delivered to Braddock until the death of Madame Robillard.

    The rest of this part of the book is Braddock's memories of what happened forty years prior when he was a young newspaper reporter hired by Madame Robillard, known then as Lady Ravenscliff, to research her husband's death which occurred in London in 1909.

    Part Two of the book is told by Henry Cort in 1890 Paris. Mr. Cort was a British spy. Part Three is presented from the memories of John Stone in Venice in 1867. John Stone was the husband of Lady Ravenscliff who died in 1909.

    I was a bit mystified at first when I saw the three parts were not presented in chronological order. At the end of Part One, I wondered why there was more to read. It seemed to be a perfectly satisfactory ending. However by the end of the book I understood why the author arranged the book in the way he did. There was no other way to write the story, now that I see it in its whole and the second and third parts were necessary.

    The historical references throughout the book are educational without being dry. I also liked the financial information presented by the characters, even though friends of mine who read the book said they skipped over parts of it. I read every one of the 610 pages, some more than once. It is that type of book you want to keep reading, but when it ends, you know there is no more to be said.

    I found it an enjoyable read with unforgettable characters and scenes. Unlike some books, there were times I didn't have a feel for where the story was going next, but I just went along and was richly rewarded for doing so. I can't say more about the details without ruining the story for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2011

    Loved, loved, loved this book!

    Stone's Fall is a story told from four different viewpoints. With each telling, you learn a little bit more about the mystery. Each of the characters were interesting. I found the book very well written. I've read a few of Pears' other stories and enjoyed them as well. Stone's Fall is his best, in my opinion. I can't wait until his next book comes out. Stone's Fall is a definite must-read!

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  • Posted June 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Complex Plot That Unfolds Slowly

    William John Stone, Baron Ravenscliff, the wealthy English industrialist, has died. Not unusual for a man of his age, but his death was not of old age or disease. Instead, he fell to his death from his office window; a second floor room. When his will is read, he leaves everything to his wife, Elizabeth, with two exceptions. He leaves a legacy to a French woman no one has heard him speak of, and he leaves a legacy to a child he apparently fathered that no one knew about.

    Since the will cannot be settled until these two legacies are distributed, Lady Elizabeth engages the services of a newspaper journalist, to investigate and find the two recipients. Matthew Braddock, a young reporter with nothing to recommend him except his ingenuity and quick intelligence is her pick.

    As Matthew delves into Stone's life, he must learn about the world of finance where Stone was king. Stone knew little about politics, or the arts, but he knew everything about money and how it could be used to create dynasties and political alliances that bound countries together.

    Braddock is soon involved in a world of complex intrigue. He learns of Stone's involvement with spies, about beautiful women and betrayals, of backgrounds full of secrets, of amazing kindnesses and casual cruelties. The plot twists and turns back onto itself, making connections that the reader doesn't see coming. At the end, a twist that will remain in readers' minds long after the book is completed, hits them like a runaway train.

    This book is recommended for mystery readers who like complex plots and a slow unfolding. It is not incredibly violent, but requires the full attention of the reader. Pears has created memorable characters whose layers are slowly revealed until the astonishing denouement.

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  • Posted March 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Little Dry, But a Good Story

    I'd really like to give this three-and-a-half stars, since I had a difficult time liking any of the characters much. The novel is part mystery (which revolves around a beautiful woman of unknown origin) and partly a chronicle of the rise of world financial empires during the last part of the 19th century. It was often hard for me to wade through the machinations of the the banking and investment industries. The mystery was more absorbing to me, but generally I found the writing a bit dry. Overall, though, Iain Pears fans will not be disappointed.

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  • Posted February 23, 2011

    Unexpected plot twists abound - great book!

    This book is long and complex, but well worth the time. I will not spoil it, but the very last plot twist was just amazing... I never saw it coming. I consider that high praise, since a lot of books are so transparent as to where they are heading. Parts of it are confusing, especially the sections dealing with complicated financial issues, but you don't have to understand all of it to follow the plot. I really enjoyed this book and expect to be hard pressed to read another as well written and plotted. But I will be looking...

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  • Posted June 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Stone's Fall is a clever fascinating historical espionage thriller

    In 1909 London, wealthy businessman Baron John Stone falls from his mansion's study window to his death. His will names a daughter as receiving part of his legacy. His younger Widow Elizabeth is stunned because John never mentioned having any children. She hires reporter Matthew Braddock to find her stepdaughter.

    In 1890 Paris, spy Henry Cort knows Elizabeth. He considers her the greatest performer of all times as she can get into any role and fool even espionage agents used to masquerades. As the reporter who has fallen in love with his client and Stone who loved his wife, wonder as much as Cort who also loved the many faces of this siren, just who the real Elizabeth is.

    Stone's Fall is a clever fascinating historical espionage twisting thriller that grips the audience with a need to know more about the convoluted Elizabeth just like the enthralled males in her complicated life that makes the DNA helix look elementary, my dear reader. Even with changes subtly in narration, the story line is fast-paced although it tends to decelerate during financial discussions. Fans will enjoy this convoluted espionage thriller as mass production of weapons of war are connected through the years by the charming Elizabeth and the men who want her.

    Harriet Klausner

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  • Posted August 8, 2009

    My favorite book this summer

    I love how Pears tells his story from 3 different vantage points. I have told my friends to read it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent

    Incredible story. The ending pulls it all together and leaves you wanting more.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2010

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
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