Customer Reviews for

The Stranger (A New Translation by Matthew Ward)

Average Rating 4
( 240 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(114)

4 Star

(77)

3 Star

(33)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(10)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

wow

You have to go into this book with an open mind, and a slight knowledge of Existentialism. It also helps if at one time in your life, you had questioned your existence. That is probably why I enjoyed the book so much.

posted by Anonymous on May 22, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

X

This was the most disturbing, disgusting and most depressing book that I have ever read in my life. We had too choose a french author and read a book by them. Im in seventh grade and boy did i choose the wrong book to read. Let me just give you the last line of the book...
This was the most disturbing, disgusting and most depressing book that I have ever read in my life. We had too choose a french author and read a book by them. Im in seventh grade and boy did i choose the wrong book to read. Let me just give you the last line of the book; i will go to my execution tomorrow and hope there will be a big croud full of hate. What kind of book is that.

posted by Anonymous on March 1, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2006

    Could have been better

    I read this book for class last Saturday and currently I'm quite indifferent about this book. I loved the subtle irony that is persistant throughout it. There is even irony in my indifference because what keeps me on the fence from saying I enjoyed this book is the narrator's consistant indifference about everything and his lack of ability to form true opinions about others or even the situation he is in. This bothered me and I would even go as far to say that it got on my nerves, but I think that I will read this again in the future and maybe my opinion will change...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2007

    only a reader for school

    This is a interesting but weird novel to read.I never met a character like Meursault in any book before.He shows no sympathy or emotion towards anything,even towards his mother's death.It seemed like the only thing this character cared about was having sexual intercourse and maintaining his daily routine until he killed the Arab.Meursault seems like he has no heart but instead a 'black hole' that nobody or anything could fill up.I would only recommend this book to students who like reading or who has to read for school,like myself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2007

    The Stranger

    After reading The Stranger by Albert Camus, I wasn't quite sure how I felt about it. I found it to be a very quick and easy read but yet, I felt that it could have been much better. I liked how in the beginning, the reader kind of gets an insight about Meursault's personality as it opens with his mothers death. After that, I felt the book just got really bizarre and as events would happen, the author wouldn't really ellaborate on them. Weird things kept happening and then I felt that the book just abruptly ended. I found the thematic content of the book to be interesting but the rest of the book didn't seem to follow through. Overall, I didn't hate the book but, becuase im left feeling so indifferent about it, I don't think I would recommend it to anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2007

    The Stranger

    I found this book to be really interesting since Meursault has a really different approach on life. His indifferences are kind of frustrating. The Stranger does a good job of examining the point of existence, but Meursault is kind of weird in the way he doesn't care about anything. He doesn't feel emotional about things that should be important to him. I can't exactly say what I thought about this book. I enjoyed it and was able to get through it. Although I did find the last couple of pages became boring. While reading it though, I came across how it reminded me of the ¿The Perks of Being a Wallflower¿, by Stephen Chobsky, this book is ¿easy to read but hard to read well¿. That I believe to be true and I think to truly take in the book and understand it, you must read it twice.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Longer version of the Metamorphisis?

    I believe that this book was a dark look into the psyche of one man, of all men. Camus' description of a man with no soul is a sick a twisted one. The book took a big turn after the random shooting of the Arab, after a slow start. It's a short book, but i still believe it was drawn out a little too much. It's not my kind of book, but i still must respect the genre, written in the same vein as Kafka's The Metamorphisis.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2007

    The Stranger

    This book to me seemed very boring and did not catch my interest. Meursault's character is very dull, and is numb to emotion. After his mothers death, he showed no concern or attatchment to her. What surprised me about him was he made no connections or bonds with other people, such as his mother, and Marie who wanted a relationship with Meursault. What I enjoyed about his character was he does not judge many people even though he has many negative thoughts in his mind. Meursault is also very loyal, for instance when he lied to the police about Raymond beating the girl so he wouldn't get in trouble. This book at times did grasp my attention, but there was too many times during reading where I was brought down by Muersault's attitude.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2006

    Strange Perspective

    This book is interesting since Meursault has a really different approach to life, but his indifference is kind of frustrating. Camus thought of himself as an absurdist, and this book really shows that. The Stranger does a good job of examining the point of existence, but Meursault is kind of hard to care about since he doesn't care about anything. He doesn't feel emotional about things that should be important to him.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    Depressing...

    I read this book for a college class, and even though I enjoyed it I found it very depressing. I like the simplistic, down-to-earth style in which it's written, but the subject matter was rather... depressing. I'm not too crazy about the 'life is pointless' existentialist philosophy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2005

    Not what I was expecting

    I've heard good things about this book and about the author.That may be true, but this translation sucks. On the back it mentions that its a clarified version which probably has to do something with the too short sentances. I couldn't finish this book because it was not very well translated. (?) It was a boring easy reader. If I can find a translation a bit more challenging then I would probably find the story more engaging.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2004

    what a book

    In the novel the stranger,by albert camus,its setting took place in france.the book is also translated from french for your pleasure.this book has two parts.first-started with a guys mom died.second-its taking place in a court room. I liked and disliked this book.i liked it because it waas interesting how he lived his life. he,meursault,is an observer. I disliked it because it was kinda drawn out.it took too long to get to the point. and when it got to part two it got confusing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2002

    The Stranger

    This book is set in a small beach town outside of Algiers. This book was written after World War I and before the outbreak of World War II. The author Albert Camus was born on November 7, 1913 at Mondovi in Algiers. Albert¿s father, Lucien Camus, Was killed in 1914 during world War I. His mother was deaf, sullen, and poor, and was struggling to take care of her two sons. Albert didn't have a good childhood, he would play athletics, study, and/or work part-time just to spend time away from his house. The book starts off with mersaults Mother dying. Mersaults is a very insensitive guy. He ends up getting involved with Raymond Sintes his next door neighbor who is a pimp. Raymond beats up his girlfriend and he ends up persuading Mersault to write a letter to his girlfriend. So Mersaults does it not knowing it would led to Raymond beating his girlfriend up brutally. Mersults ends up having to testify in court on Raymon¿s behalf. He told the court that Raymond¿s girlfriend provoked Raymond into the fight. Mersault¿s and Raymond end up going to a beach house in Masson with a few of Raymond¿s friends. There were two Arabs there and one of them was the brother of Raymond¿s girlfriend. A fight had broken out and Raymond ends up getting stabbed two times in the arm and the other in the mouth. Mersault¿s gets in the middle of the conflict and he kills one of the Arabs. The brother of Raymond¿s girlfriend was the one he killed. Mersault¿s goes to jail for murder. The attorney tries to get Mersault to speak on his mother¿s death. They are trying to say that he did it. Or he led up to his mother¿s death by sending her to the Home for the Aged in Marengo. At the end the Jury decides if he is guilty or not guilty. What do you think? This book will keep you on the edge it was a very good book. It¿s like a mystery and you have to solve it. Do you really think that they will sentence him? Well for me I know I was trying to guess to see if I was going to get it right. But it ended different from what I thought. This book was basically about life and death. And how Mersaults really didn't have feelings for Marie, he told her that he could never love her but she still insisted that he marry her. He didn¿t even really morn over his mother¿s death. In this book Mersaults was the stranger. I know how he feels because sometimes I feel alienated by people too. And I am sure that everyone else has felt like that before. This book had a lot of imagery you can just picture everything that is going on in this book. If you were to close your eyes you can see yourself in Mersaults shoes. And just using imagery caught reader¿s attention. In this book it was part of the author¿s life. I don¿t even read books that often but there is something about this book that keep me reading. Its like once I picked it up I couldn¿t put it back down and im sure you will feel the same.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2002

    The Stranger context

    The book contains harsh symbolisim which is hard to convey in a similar sense of personification without the direct correlation of the presiding facts shown in the novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2002

    From good to bad

    This book was a good book.It had its ups and downs.It had its suspense parts a child trying to live his life but every thing is not going the right way for him.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2002

    Meursault's emotional detachment

    People live their lives in a way pleasing to them; in ¿The Stranger¿, by Albert Camus, a man lives his life desensitized to the world surrounding him, and the way he chooses, and as a result he is happy. This book is about a man named Meursault. He seems to be very desensitized to other to the world around him. It seems he has no heart or feelings. The book starts with him receiving a fax about his mother¿s death, and he seems to not care or feel any sympathy, even at the funeral. When he returns home, he goes to the beach because he loves to swim. At the beach he meets a woman from his work named Marie. They become good friends and she asks him to marry him. He agrees to get married, but says he does not love her. Throughout the first part of the book, Meursault always notices Arab¿s and he doesn¿t like them. At the end of Part 1, Meursault, Marie, and some friends are at the beach and the run into some Arabs. At first they don¿t fight, but they see them again and Meursault shoots and kills the Arab. Part two takes place after Meursault¿s arrest. He waits over a year for his trial and during that time a Magistraight tries to get Meursault to repent, but he feels no remorse for what he has done. Marie also visited but was not aloud because they were not married. In court they ask why Meursault killed the Arab, and he said it was because of the sun. The court said he is an empty- souled person, and a monster unable to show remorse, and sentenced him the death penalty. Meursault is happy and only wishes that a crowd of haters would join him at his execution. <P> Meursault lives for the present and is totally emotionally detached. He does not believe in God or think that people have any importance. This mans life was not very interesting, therefore neither was the book. It was quite different however. This book shows that if you live a life desirable to yourself, you will be happy. The author chose a strange life for Meursault to live and be happy with, but he got his point across with it. This book was rather easy to follow, because it focuses on Meursault the majority of the time and he kept a consistent attitude and personality toward life throughout the book. This was helpful with interpreting the book and finding the theme. The author was successful in displaying his purpose, in the way that he suggested people live different lives and are happy with them. Meursault¿s life is a strong example of living a life desirable to one¿s self.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2000

    I'm still a stranger

    This was recommended to me by my Pre-IB Composition teacher because it is 'a little off-kilter' and I had an oral presentatioin due shortly. Well, it lived up to the off-kilter, but it was difficult to get into. I found myself drifting and it was easy to put the book down. When I did get into the book, it was worth it. If you've got the time to spare, the short read is worth it. Definitely for the existentialist point of you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2000

    Meursault's Philosophy

    When I read the first half of The Stranger, like most people, I thought that Meursault was unfeeling, like a sort of beast. Then my opinions of him changed when I read the second half of the novel. Meursault became almost human, and I began to understand him and what he was talking about more. During the first half of the novel, Meursault seemed inhuman. He had no emotions: he didn't care whether or not Marie married him, and he didn't care that his mother died. He killed one of the Arabs that had threatened his friend Raymond without much of a reason but that the sun was irritating him. Yet this all changes in the second part. In the second half, the reader sees a different side of Meursault, the one faced with death. Meursault's beliefs are revealed, too. And I tend to agree with a lot of them. I agree that the universe is meaningless. There is no god- our purpose on earth is not to earn our place in heaven. However, I disagree with Meursault when he says that we have no meaning to each other. That may be true concerning complete strangers, but no with our family and friends. When I read all about Meursault's beliefs, I began to wonder whether I agreed with him or not. I found that sometimes I did, but often I didn't- nonetheless, Meursault brings up some interesting points just before his death.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2