Customer Reviews for

The Sun Also Rises

Average Rating 4
( 306 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

not so fast

What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that...
What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that the writing really soaks in, and leaves a lasting impression. A few passages that come to mind that I happily waded through, was the bus trek through the mountains and when Jake goes into great detail describing bull fighting.

Don't feel like you need to burn right through the book (unless, I guess if you're reading it for a paper due tomorrow). Hemingway's writing really shines at a slower reading pace than say, compared to a Dan Brown novel.

It's definitely a good read, as long as you are willing to commit to Hemingway's style and pacing. If not, you'll be miserable.

posted by timtimtim on February 3, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

If you're in high school and looking for an interesting book to read for a project, this is not it.

During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” ...
During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” After being introduced to the main character, Jake Barnes, who also makes subtle suggestions, you find that he is impotent, most likely from an injury he sustained during World War I. From what I gathered he and a group of friends are all American Expatriates who tend to Globe Trot. They take many trips and meet up all over the world. One of Jakes closest friends Robert Cohn is the first that he mentions, before the love of his life, Lady Brett Ashley. Robert Cohn is not a war veteran, but a former middle-weight boxing champion at Princeton. Lady Brett Ashley is a very attractive British socialite who met Jake Barnes while treating his war wounds. Although they were quite close and cared about each other, you find that she is unwilling to be with Jake because she cannot have a sexual relationship due to his injury. Instead you are introduced to more of Jake’s war buddies as the story goes along, and find that Lady Brett Ashley is quite a promiscuous woman. She seems to have sex with everyone but Jake Barnes. On a trip to Spain to party and watch bullfights, and Lady Brett Ashley, now married, she finds herself in love with a 19 year old “Star Bullfighter,” who she insists on meeting, and of course has sex with him too. I was actually pretty surprised by this story, since I always thought World War I times had very feminine and innocent women with good morals. I think how loose Lady Brett Ashley is tortures Jake Barnes and adds to his drunkenness makes her a total female version of a womanizer. I ended up feeling really bad for Jake, to see someone you care about being intimate with other men and not you, when you care the most about her. Jake’s problem makes him seem like he has very low self-esteem because he is not a “full man.” At the end of the story, you do know that she cares for Jake, and did imagine how great they could have been together if everything was all right. Overall, I can’t say it was a bad story, but I was disappointed that the book wasn’t as good as the Librarian and back cover summary was. It’s like I was hoping that some miracle would happen and Jake would really get the girl.

posted by 10821002 on January 20, 2012

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    Posted December 26, 2010

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    Posted October 25, 2008

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