Customer Reviews for

The Sun Also Rises

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

not so fast

What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that...
What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that the writing really soaks in, and leaves a lasting impression. A few passages that come to mind that I happily waded through, was the bus trek through the mountains and when Jake goes into great detail describing bull fighting.

Don't feel like you need to burn right through the book (unless, I guess if you're reading it for a paper due tomorrow). Hemingway's writing really shines at a slower reading pace than say, compared to a Dan Brown novel.

It's definitely a good read, as long as you are willing to commit to Hemingway's style and pacing. If not, you'll be miserable.

posted by timtimtim on February 3, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

If you're in high school and looking for an interesting book to read for a project, this is not it.

During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” ...
During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” After being introduced to the main character, Jake Barnes, who also makes subtle suggestions, you find that he is impotent, most likely from an injury he sustained during World War I. From what I gathered he and a group of friends are all American Expatriates who tend to Globe Trot. They take many trips and meet up all over the world. One of Jakes closest friends Robert Cohn is the first that he mentions, before the love of his life, Lady Brett Ashley. Robert Cohn is not a war veteran, but a former middle-weight boxing champion at Princeton. Lady Brett Ashley is a very attractive British socialite who met Jake Barnes while treating his war wounds. Although they were quite close and cared about each other, you find that she is unwilling to be with Jake because she cannot have a sexual relationship due to his injury. Instead you are introduced to more of Jake’s war buddies as the story goes along, and find that Lady Brett Ashley is quite a promiscuous woman. She seems to have sex with everyone but Jake Barnes. On a trip to Spain to party and watch bullfights, and Lady Brett Ashley, now married, she finds herself in love with a 19 year old “Star Bullfighter,” who she insists on meeting, and of course has sex with him too. I was actually pretty surprised by this story, since I always thought World War I times had very feminine and innocent women with good morals. I think how loose Lady Brett Ashley is tortures Jake Barnes and adds to his drunkenness makes her a total female version of a womanizer. I ended up feeling really bad for Jake, to see someone you care about being intimate with other men and not you, when you care the most about her. Jake’s problem makes him seem like he has very low self-esteem because he is not a “full man.” At the end of the story, you do know that she cares for Jake, and did imagine how great they could have been together if everything was all right. Overall, I can’t say it was a bad story, but I was disappointed that the book wasn’t as good as the Librarian and back cover summary was. It’s like I was hoping that some miracle would happen and Jake would really get the girl.

posted by 10821002 on January 20, 2012

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  • Posted February 3, 2010

    not so fast

    What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that the writing really soaks in, and leaves a lasting impression. A few passages that come to mind that I happily waded through, was the bus trek through the mountains and when Jake goes into great detail describing bull fighting.

    Don't feel like you need to burn right through the book (unless, I guess if you're reading it for a paper due tomorrow). Hemingway's writing really shines at a slower reading pace than say, compared to a Dan Brown novel.

    It's definitely a good read, as long as you are willing to commit to Hemingway's style and pacing. If not, you'll be miserable.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My First Hemingway

    I thought The Sun Also Rises was a great book. It was my first Hemingway and I was unsure of how much I would like it. I have heard a lot of things about his books being boring. I think boring is a terrible word people are using. Maybe they mean 'simple'. His writing style is very to the point and very matter of fact. He does not use words he doesn't need to. The story is easy to follow, other than the conversations sometimes can get tricky. I thought it was a beautifully written book that is somewhat easy to relate to. The ending of the book is PERFECT. If you read this for class you may benefit reading it again for leisure.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great book about an odd group of friends and thier adventure while in Spain for Bull Fights

    This book was recommended to me by my Father-in-law who is a retired English teacher. Hemingway's dialog can be difficult to follow but if you stick with it, it's worth your while. I look forward to reading more of Hemingway work.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2014

    At least it's realistic...

    A somewhat boring novel but as my headline states very realistic. There is great meaning behind the story, which is not fully revealed until the very end. Was expecting more but still enjoyed the read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Lively lives of those who dont care

    A fun and gripping look into the lives of expats who live for now yet are never satsfied with the future, or even at times what they had just lived for. Enjoy the 20s jargon and place yourself in the shoes of those who had lived for war and now are lucky enough to live for life.

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  • Posted September 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I like Hemingway!

    This was a moving story of a WWI injured soldier, Jake, who remains in love with a woman, even though their relationship would never be more than friends. Brett, his love, seems flighty, but not callous. She is a free spirit, so it's best that he expects no fidelity from her. He is her "go to guy" and I like their relationship, even if it is tragic.
    Hemingway's descriptions of France and Spain are beautiful. The bull fights are exciting and majestic, if brutal.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    Found it!

    I first introduced to this book in my junior yr of high school by my favorite teacher i snice then couldn't remember wut it was called or who it was by all i remember was bulls i recently saw something about hemingway en decided to look him up en accidentally ran into this book im so excited to read it again!

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  • Posted July 19, 2012

    It's a classic for a reason!

    It is AMAZING that this book was written so long ago. It is still a fresh read and a PERFECT summer book. Sure, there's words in it that sound silly to modern ears ("tight" meaning drunk) but overall it's about a group of people that we can all relate to.
    And I say it's a good summer read because in these weird financial times there are a lot of us that would love to go to Europe and have fun. Instead, we're stuck at work looking at a clock that seems like it isn't moving fast enough during the work day.
    But we can still visit some pretty incredible places thanks to Hemingway's tale.
    I go home, pour a glass of wine, sit on my back porch and read my way to another place.
    I'll let the experts disect and analyze Hemingway's prose. It is pretty incredible that this story is still relevant and fun (and poignant). For me, it was a great (and quick) read. Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2008

    A Good Novel by A Great Author

    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway is an outstanding novel of a writer who is part of the lost generation. Jake Barnes, the narrator, is a journalist and an expatriate war veteran of World War I. In the first few chapters the narrator Jake Barnes begins by illustrating the differences between himself and fellow friend Robert Cohn. These illustrations of the characters lead the reader to find similarities and connections between Ernest Hemingway and his main character. One of Jake¿s disgust of Cohn¿s differences is mainly because of their different personalities. Jake is more self-critical and down to earth while Cohn is unable to be self-critical and is trying to live a fairytale by planning a trip to South America. Thus, these are all some of their differences, the most important difference is that although they both seem to follow a sport, one does it for passion while the other one does it in need. As the novel progresses it becomes more clear that Jake Barnes is a sportsman solely because he enjoys sports specially bullfighting. On the other hand, Cohn, although winning a boxing title in Princeton University, he learned to box only so he could defend himself from does who made fun of him for being Jewish. Now this is important in that these specific details elucidate that novel is autobiographical, especially after one links the fact that Hemingway too was a war veteran and shared the same desire as Jake did for the sport of bullfighting. Consequently, my favorite thing about this novel is the realistic troubles and pain Jake Barnes has to endure. While serving as an ambulance driver in the war Jake Barnes encounters some bad luck. He is wounded accidentally and loses his manhood meaning he has become sexless. Following this further, the novel begins to unfold through his eyes as he suffers and fights to leave his illness in the past. His personal hardships allow him to no longer ignore death but rather to be sympathetic, and understand the role of bullfighting within its culture. In addition, Brett Ashley brings forth another great part of the novel, which is forbidden love. Although, she is depicted as women who has sex with many men, and has married men without loving them, she falls in love. Despite, her affairs with Cohn, Mike, and Pedro, her heart belong to Jake. However, even though she loves Jake she refuses to marry him or live with him. She declares that this cannot happen because if she were to go live with Jake as he had asked her too, she would be disloyal to him because of his inability to have sex. These are just some of the reasons that should inspire you to read this novel.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2005

    The Key is between the Lines!!!!

    In response to all of the reviewers who felt there was a lack of plot in this novel, you should be proud of yourselves, you discovered the underlying meaning of the entire story without realizing it!! Hemingway wrote this book to express the disillusionment he was personally feeling with the world, the sense that nothing mattered, that LIFE didn't have a PLOT. A man in Hemingway's state of mind wouldn't write an action packed romantic thriller. He was still recovering from the mental anguish of WWI, like the character in the book Hemingway felt aimless, hence the LACK of plot. Try reading between the lines sometime, a little thought goes a long way.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2006

    The true picture of life after war

    Hemingway really struck it in the heart with this one. He is a master at literature and has the ability to bring to life the meaning and thoughts of his characters simply by his use of the english language. He is truly a unique writer. This was an excellent book. Although it has been accused of having no plot, it is precisly the absence of meaning that portrays the 'lost generation' that hemingway talks about. Through dependence on sex,alcohol, and a life with a religion of death you realize that each character is searching for truth after the destruction of war.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2005

    Not bad, considering it has to do w/ bullfighting.

    This was actually pretty good...other than the fact that I had to read it in class, the story line was very good and touching. I read an analysis on this story and the part where Jake goes back to Spain, is a way of choosing reality instead of drinking away his pain in France where it's full of illusions. It's a beautiful book, and I especially liked the end. The characters are very deep, which seems the opposite of how Hemingway portrays them but I guess that's his talent. His writing seems plain but implies a lot if you think carefully.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2005

    Good but not Hemingway Good

    They had you read it in 8th grade?? It's kind of risque...not to mention they should probably teach you how to write proper english before they have you reading books written in deliberately improper English...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2004

    ¡Buenísimo!

    This was a great novel. I actually read it while I was studying abroad in Spain. His descriptions of the country are perfect.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2003

    A Very Good Read

    This book was very interesting once you got through the introductions to all the characters, and started to get the feel for the book. It was very laid back at times, though sometimes surprising and intense. Overall, I found it very entertaining, and I do consider it an important mark of history. A lot of that era (mid 1920) comes through in the ways the characters behave, and the things they experience. I found the bullfighting very interesting, Ernest Hemingway obviously knew a lot about it, and was very passionate about it. I would definitely recommend this book. Its only downfall might be that it can be somewhat redundant and predictable in the beginning, but it picks up if you stay with it. A very good book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2002

    Excellent book about single life.

    Excellent book about single life, in that time period, and the effects that the war had on the peoples minds. Great book about what it was like in that time period, alot of heavy drinking, and repetitiveness.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2002

    awsome

    i like how he uses normal phrases and dosen't hold back slang. i also love how outragous they can be when there tight, an how they will just have these outbursts of emotion.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2002

    Review of The Sun Also Rises

    A bit hard to follow at times, and verbose. Excellent insight into the life and times of the American expatriates in Paris, and the shallowness of their lives. Felt like I was there in Pamplona for the fiesta, and bullfights.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2001

    A Tragrdy

    The Sun Also Rises, a timeless classic, no doubt. Hemmingway's simplicity is evoked beutifuly in this novel. No other author could capture such a tragedy as elegently as hemmingway.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2000

    Surprised

    I picked up a hard back of this book for 50 cents at a garage sale. I love literature and frequently shop for such bargains, and frequently find them. Hemingway is never an author that I had a great urge to read, and I believed that this book would bore me. I was very wrong. Although there is little action, it is easy to relate to the characters and the exposure of human emotion is incredible. This novella is well worth the effort to read, and isn't it pretty to think so?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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