Customer Reviews for

The Sun Also Rises

Average Rating 4
( 302 )
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(149)

4 Star

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(34)

2 Star

(27)

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(22)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

not so fast

What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that...
What I like most about Hemingway, is his pacing. I'm not one who thinks that how fast one can turn the pages necessarily equates to the quality of the writing. I find for me to really enjoy Hemingway, I have to read some parts even slower than I typically would, so that the writing really soaks in, and leaves a lasting impression. A few passages that come to mind that I happily waded through, was the bus trek through the mountains and when Jake goes into great detail describing bull fighting.

Don't feel like you need to burn right through the book (unless, I guess if you're reading it for a paper due tomorrow). Hemingway's writing really shines at a slower reading pace than say, compared to a Dan Brown novel.

It's definitely a good read, as long as you are willing to commit to Hemingway's style and pacing. If not, you'll be miserable.

posted by timtimtim on February 3, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

If you're in high school and looking for an interesting book to read for a project, this is not it.

During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” ...
During a visit to my school library, the librarian had been discussing the book, “The Sun Also Rises.” The way she described it, it seemed to be something I’d be interested in reading, especially her subtle suggestion that it was about a guy who had some “male issues.” After being introduced to the main character, Jake Barnes, who also makes subtle suggestions, you find that he is impotent, most likely from an injury he sustained during World War I. From what I gathered he and a group of friends are all American Expatriates who tend to Globe Trot. They take many trips and meet up all over the world. One of Jakes closest friends Robert Cohn is the first that he mentions, before the love of his life, Lady Brett Ashley. Robert Cohn is not a war veteran, but a former middle-weight boxing champion at Princeton. Lady Brett Ashley is a very attractive British socialite who met Jake Barnes while treating his war wounds. Although they were quite close and cared about each other, you find that she is unwilling to be with Jake because she cannot have a sexual relationship due to his injury. Instead you are introduced to more of Jake’s war buddies as the story goes along, and find that Lady Brett Ashley is quite a promiscuous woman. She seems to have sex with everyone but Jake Barnes. On a trip to Spain to party and watch bullfights, and Lady Brett Ashley, now married, she finds herself in love with a 19 year old “Star Bullfighter,” who she insists on meeting, and of course has sex with him too. I was actually pretty surprised by this story, since I always thought World War I times had very feminine and innocent women with good morals. I think how loose Lady Brett Ashley is tortures Jake Barnes and adds to his drunkenness makes her a total female version of a womanizer. I ended up feeling really bad for Jake, to see someone you care about being intimate with other men and not you, when you care the most about her. Jake’s problem makes him seem like he has very low self-esteem because he is not a “full man.” At the end of the story, you do know that she cares for Jake, and did imagine how great they could have been together if everything was all right. Overall, I can’t say it was a bad story, but I was disappointed that the book wasn’t as good as the Librarian and back cover summary was. It’s like I was hoping that some miracle would happen and Jake would really get the girl.

posted by 10821002 on January 20, 2012

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  • Posted May 19, 2011

    Classical and Beautiful

    This book is so well written it knocks most books out of the park. It is a beautifully written love story that is semi-off key, not as traditional. I love the story because it's very realistic. The love between Jake and Brett (the two main characters) is understated but very real and it's always around them, but rarely outright stated. Jake is an incredible character filled with life, flaws, and great qualities and his steadiness counteracts Brett's outrageousness wonderfully. The two of them love each other and love to have a good time, but their love is compromised by the situation they're in. It's a classically written book telling a very raw and real love story that will haunt you forever.

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  • Posted January 29, 2011

    loved it

    if you like his style youll love this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2011

    lol

    i loved it even though i didnt buy it

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  • Posted May 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Story Of Good Friends, Great Places, And The Woman That Shakes Them Up.

    A classic in my book. E. Hemingway depicts the beauties of Europe, binge drinking, and wild festivals. Though he has been criticized for his slow writing pace, his ability to describe the surroundings and environment is superb and makes the reader feel that they are right in the mix of their adventures. Great book to include on a plane or long car ride.

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  • Posted September 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Book!

    Hemingway is one of the greatest writers ever and this book is no exception.

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  • Posted June 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome!

    Hemingway shows that his writing is about reading between the lines.He shows what a man should act like even though circumstances may keep him from being a complete man.I really like this novel and I recommend it to any guy who likes "guy" novels.I'm not entirely sure women would like it but I recommend it to them too.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    brilliant must i say more

    i dont think i can say anything more about this

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2008

    For those looking for meaning

    I may only be fourteen, but I've read this book for my English class, and it really is a great book. Although the book is centered around these selfish drunks, it's the meaning between the lines that makes it great. It addresses themes of masochism, real meaning in primitivism, finding authenticity in a bland world, unlikely heroes, and a great look at the Lost Generation. There were a couple grammar mistakes that threw me off at times, but if you need to learn something new about humanity or about the Lost generation, you should read this book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2007

    A reviewer

    Never before have I seen and been so captivated by a story based on flat characters. However, in Sun, I was more than pleasantly suprised I was in awe. Hemingway's power of characterization is more than comprhendable. To create such characters, and with so little words --as is Hemingway's style -- is almost unfound in contemporary literature. Truly, the definition of a flat character, like those that comprise the cast of this novel, indicates a low level of literary skill, as the flat character usually serves only minor roles. In Sun, a fiction populated on a seemingly single plane, these flat characters are intentional, propell the story, and are completely awesome, under their individual facades that embodie Gertrude Stien's 'lost generation'. As the story continues from commencement to the end of the great fiesta, the characters, one by one, fall under the omnipotent skill and capability of Hemingway each trite facade broken down to reveal pathetic, hopeless, trivial individuals, all without purpose or cause. Such is the power of Hemingway. All characters, that is, except for the nearly lost, missionless hero, Jake, and the very embodiment of Stein's 'Lost Generation', the impervious Lady Brett Ashley. While the Lady Brett withstands Hemingway's revelatory powers -- perhaps because she wears no facade she is the very face that all others wear -- the Main character Jake, from whose point of view we see the story, is a character written as a lost sole, nearly completely surrendered to a life surrounded by these flat characters, on these flat plains that the story is drafted upon. The reader knows the difference in him from the others in the varying ways he describes the other characters, and Paris, their home, and the beautiful, untouched Spain Hemingway's Eden. Truly, in The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway displays his power over the written word, as well as creates a worlds of inhuman, stone characters, unable to feel and behave as real humans -- mainly because they lack in purpose and value -- tearing them down for our insite and understanding.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book is the single most beautiful piece of literature that I have ever read. Hemmingway lets YOUR imagination take a journey, instead if painting everything for you, your mind is free to wander through the feelings, emotions, and strife of each character without being burdened by the overuse of adjectives that we see so much in modern American Literature. His characters are well thought, brilliant, and downtrodden. This is the best Hemmingway novel I have read to date, as I said, BEAUTY PERSONIFIED.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2007

    A Self Indulged Generation

    Ernest Hemingway¿s dedication page¿s announcement ¿You are all a lost generation¿ should have read ¿You are all a self indulged generation¿. Clearly, Hemingway¿s The Sun Also Rises, in a larger scope, was intended to depict a simple message of hope. Afterall, he does offer the biblical reference, ¿The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down,¿ as a beacon of optimism. Despite the fact that World War I had destroyed the lives of ¿the lost generation,¿ they will rise again. However, on a superficial level, Hemmingway flips the dynamic of a traditional inspirational novel to further his philosophy that even those who are the elite and brave are perhaps the most dysfunctional. The Sun Also Rises captures its audience through a story reiterated from the perspective of Jake Barnes, an expatriate journalist from Kansas City, who does news-grams from an American station in Paris. In fact, Barnes most closely resembles Hemingway's own voicem, one that marinates in booze, broads, fights, bulls, and all things macho. The novel initially established Jake's circle of friends in the first few chapters. Jake¿s love intrest Brett Ashley, the verbose, effervescent, sharp-tongued English 'dame' whose rapport with Jake makes for some of the liveliest parts of the novel. Jake can't stand Mike, Brett's melodramatic boyfriend. He pretends to like Robert Cohn, a Jewish novelist, but actually despises him because of his heritage. Closing the circle is Jake's friend Bill, a more verbose, more genial, and at times more vulgar version of Jake himself. All in all, the realtionships resemble a rediculously staged soap oprah. The novel¿s structure is rather simplistic. Whether this is done intentionally or not, Hemingway creates a creed. The reader is endowed in the novel¿s succinctness, clarity, austerity and lack of pretense. One finds his or herself, unconsciously rooting for characters despite ludicrous flaws. Hemingway¿s ability to illustrate and develop characters though simple mechanics contributes to the validity and strength that swathes all 251 pages. The Hemingway sentence is a trademark of sorts, simple yet beautiful, beauty that flourishes from concrete descriptions and serene settings. Whether the scenes takes place in Paris cafés, or the stunning landscapes of Spain, or the bullfight arena at the exact tension-filled moment where the matador and the bull begin combat, one marvels on how he can say so much in such a small space, and do it in such a unique manner. His language in itself makes Heminway indispensable. If there is one thing the novel lacks, then it is surely predictability. Hemingway's appreciation of Spain and its people¿s code of ethics is highlighted when Brett falls for Pedro Romero, arguably the top bullfighter in all of Spain. Brett, who had been romantically attached to Jake as well as Cohn and engaged to Mike, is further developed as ambiguous drawing the reader deeper into their own love affair with her. Ultimately the arc of their relationship leads to the end of the novel. Barnes¿ character shifts entirely at the realization that Romero is braver and nobler than he. As if he had not been passive beforehand. He praises the bullfighter and becomes engulfed in his being. In fact, he isn¿t even bothered when Brett and Pedro embark upon a sexual relationship. How sardonic Hemingway? However, it does make for a laugh or two, a transition from the rather nonchalant tone underlying the somber purpose. Therefore, do not get discouraged if at first you find the novel a bit too surreal. Part of the thrill is the inconstancy. Hemingway¿s style of writing is simple, accurate yet lyrical. His style embodies the power of the effects of war. In essence, he depicts that war can not only cause people to behave immorally, but impulsive. In fact, the style is capable of making one feel as though they were experiencing life in the past no time machine needed.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2007

    suspenseful and zesty

    a great read, with just enough character development. yes a lot is left to the imagination.hemingway does not give away too much while letting the reader explore the writing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2007

    To the people below

    You need to appriciate Hemmingway's unique style of writing, hes discrete, no details, simple and too the point.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2007

    I love it.

    It was just a book I had to read for my class, and i thought it was going to be horrible...but i love it! It's humorous in it's own way...it takes a real person to understand that...it may all be the same manner and tone, but the characters portray their own sense in it too. The 'stalling' Hemingway has in there was sorta boring, but he makes you anticipate for what you may think, or want to happen.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2006

    great for students

    I did a research paper and project on this book. I defenitely recomend it for anybody who is doing a critical essay on it. I enjoyed this book very much. Its simple language and basic concept kept me wanting SOMETHING to happen but nothing ever did (although their adventures kept me from putting the book down). Finally in the very last paragraph it all hit me. The sadness, the bitter-sweet feeling and the excitement of the future for these people. In the end you come to find the whole story revolves around Brett & Jake. Hemingway's concept of sex in this book is really interesting. The only woman is strong, independent and hints at the new feminism era. History Buffs will enjoy this book because it gives you a 1st-person perspective in living the life during this time. Also, feminist will enjoy this book as well- to both criticize and rave

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2006

    An Exellent Read

    After finishing this book I was not sure why I was so wild about it because the plot is not incredibly interesting and the language was usual. However, the way Hemingway evokes such emotions from his readers by giving such a pitiful identity to a generation of young people blows my mind. This book is sad in a way that is hard to understand. I suppose observing a group of young'uns essentially searching for themselves brings out the feelings that all of of have once felt. Connecting with these characters in one way or another made this book very enjoyable. Must read

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2006

    5 stars for three reasons

    It gives a sense of touch to a lost time and space. I am amazed by the picture that H. can paint with so few words. I didn¿t lose interest even to the end. It¿s an easy read and the lack of what is written, including the ending leaves me to finish the story myself. It¿s not pointless, it¿s a picture and I wasn¿t expecting plot twists or some Dénouement. It¿s Hemingway. I like to compare novels of the same writer during different periods in their life.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2005

    can you say AMAZING!!!!

    I loved the way that Hemingway used raw, un-'sugar' coated details. the way he portrays relationships between different types of people were real life, yet still interesting. the charectars each seem as if they are one sterotype, but he gives us clues to their other dimensions. i read this sophmore year of high school and the discussions in class were awesome. this is a book that anyone can relate to, and seeing different points of views shows only more hemingways brilliance on creating charectars with depth. this is a must read!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    The best

    'The Sun Also Rises' is probably the best novel I ever read, and I have been reading novels for over fifty years.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2005

    Amazing Book!!!!!!!!

    I read this book for my Advanced Placement European History class, and I fell in love with it. Although many of my peers disliked the lack of a plot, I thouroughly enjoyed every minute of reading it. The descriptions of the bull fights in Spain made me feel like I was actually in Spain.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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