Customer Reviews for

The Suspect

Average Rating 3.5
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(8)

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(7)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    Anonymous

    We have a new Harriet Klausner, her name is Gail Cooke. Wow, you saved us all some big bucks by reading your mini version of the book. Now why would I want to buy this book after reading your crappy version of the story. Aren't you cheating B&N of some sales. This is where B&N should.step in and end this nonsense.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2007

    Not up to the author's standards

    I have read all of John Lescroart's books and this by far is the worst. Mr. Lescroart should stick with books featuring Dismas Hardy. If I had not known I was reading a book by John Lescroart, I would never have guessed it. The writing is very inferior to his other books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2014

    Lorrie

    A good read

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  • Posted January 15, 2012

    disappointed

    This book took me a month to read-it did not hold my attention. The court room dialogue was the best part of the book but I would recommed trying others by the author first.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2009

    Lescroat Never Disappoints

    Since discovering Lescroat's books I've been a loyal reader. I've never been disappointed. Each new book strengthens my loyalty. This one begins with naivete of the innocent believing all is well when telling the truth. But, as always, the investigating mind always has pre-determined bias and investigative directions. In reflection, there were subtle hints missed along the way but that nagging back-of-the-mind uneasiness kept building.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2009

    A Great Twist of Suspects!

    The author really keeps you guessing until the end , most likely you will have missed the real culprit. The author is well established as a great writer and you will enjoy this book.

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  • Posted March 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A very good weekend read

    Excellent book to read over the weekend. Fun plot but easy to finish and enjoy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2008

    Where's Dismas?

    In his last two novels JL has introduced 'or featured' new main characters with what amounts to cameo appearances of Dismas Hardy. Although the books are well written and the characters are good, I'm drawn to JL's novels for the characters I'm invested in.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2007

    A Real Whodunnit !!

    First book I have read by this author, always thought he wrote more like John Grisham who is a little intense for me. But this book started out great and continued right to the end. Gina was such a likeable character, I rooted for her from the start. And poor Stuart trying to keep his family together. I wanted him aquitted even if he did do it, Caryn was just too self centered to live. Then there was Kymberly. I wanted to slap some good sense into that girl, who needed discipline in the worst way. The author certainly knew his characters and after the first 2 chapters so did we. This is right up there with my most favorite books and I'll be reading John for a long time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2007

    John Lescroart comes through again with a thriller

    John Lescroart comes through again with a thriller. I was all ready to read a continuation of the Hunt Club characters. I was happy to see that John developing new characters. I didn't know who the killer was until he was ready to unvail him.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2007

    CRACKLING COURTROOM SCENES AND A SURPRISE FINISH

    With each succeeding novel, now 18 in all, John Lescroart (pronounced 'less-kwah' so you can tell your friends about this book) garners a host of new fans. He is an author one cannot ignore as his plots are scrupulously drawn, his characters likable, and he choreographs the escalation of suspense masterfully. Gina Roake, a 47-year-old partner in Dismas Hardy's law firm and a secondary character in previous Lescroart tales, is given center stage in this story of truth and justice. Still reeling from the death of her beloved fiancé, an icon in San Francisco's law world, she has gone camping by a Sierra Nevada alpine lake to be alone and, hopefully, heal. Across the lake outdoor writer Stuart Gorman has a very different reason for seeking tranquility - his wife, Dr. Caryn Dryden, had just announced that she wanted a divorce. This was a shocking, infuriating kick in the head to Stuart as he had long ago realized that their marriage was not all he wished it but had determined to remain faithful - they had made promises to each other and he, for one, intended to keep them. Nonetheless, he was furious when Caryn as much as said he no longer mattered to her and he took off for their cabin at Echo Lake. Once there, he vented his anger by polishing off half a quart of vodka then going a few rounds with the cabin - plates ricocheted off walls, chairs were broken and framed family photos smashed. Unable to find any peace, he decided to drive back to the city for a final showdown with Caryn. It was not a showdown but it was final as he found Caryn dead, her nude body by their hot tub. Knowing that he had nothing to do with his wife's death, Stuart was frank when interrogated by Sergeant Devin Juhle, admitting that they were not getting along and that she had asked for a divorce. Further, her death will make him a millionaire three times over. To Juhle, if a wife is murdered, the spouse did it. Thus, he has not doubt that Stuart is guilty - all he has to do is prove it. Upon the advice of his good friend, California Assemblyman Jedd Conley, Stuart hires Gina as his attorney. She jumps at the chance even though she has never defended a murder case. However, as she comes to know Stuart there are a few unpleasant surprises in store for her - he has twice been arrested for domestic violence, he spent a few days alone at the family cabin with Caryn's attractive sister, Debra, a young girl living across the street from Stuart swears she saw him come home at the time Caryn was killed. As the investigation proceeds it appears that a recent invention of Caryn's awaiting FDA approval may have had something to do with her death. But, who would and perhaps more importantly who could have killed her? Lescroart treats readers to some of his trademark crackling courtroom scenes, and a surprising, satisfying finish,. In addition, he leaves us to ponder whether or not we are really believed innocent until we're proven guilty. Don't miss this one! - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2007

    Excellent

    This was a great book. It started out good and kept getting better. So many twists and surprises it kept me reading all night long, couldn't put it off. Even though I miss Dis Hardy, I look forward to reading more books about Gina. I'll be recommending The Suspect to my book club members.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2007

    Suspenseful whodunnit

    The suspect, Stuart, lies so much by omission that I couldn't be sure who the killer was. Lescroart has done a great job of creating a 'seamless transition' between Dismas Hardy,Abe Glitsky and the new lawyer group that it seems much like the same familiar old law firm of the past.The story line is much more intense than I expected.Good job John!

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A MUST-HEAR THRILLER

    Versatile actor/director David Collaci who also narrated this author's Dead Irish (the first book with Dismas Hardy) has an easy-listening stage trained voice plus the ability to easily segue between characters. So deft is he at this that at times it almost seems that one is listening to a cast of readers rather than one. The conversations and confrontations between the two main characters are absolutely riveting when read by Colacci. With each succeeding novel, now 18 in all, John Lescroart (pronounced 'less-kwah' so you can tell your friends about this audiobook) garners a host of new fans. He is an author one cannot ignore as his plots are scrupulously drawn, his characters likable, and he choreographs the escalation of suspense masterfully. Gina Roake, a 47-year-old partner in Dismas Hardy's law firm and a secondary character in previous Lescroart tales, is given center stage in this story of truth and justice. Still reeling from the death of her beloved fiancé, an icon in San Francisco's law world, she has gone camping by a Sierra Nevada alpine lake to be alone and, hopefully, heal. Across the lake outdoor writer Stuart Gorman has a very different reason for seeking tranquility - his wife, Dr. Caryn Dryden, had just announced that she wanted a divorce. This was a shocking, infuriating kick in the head to Stuart as he had long ago realized that their marriage was not all he wished it but had determined to remain faithful - they had made promises to each other and he, for one, intended to keep them. Nonetheless, he was furious when Caryn as much as said he no longer mattered to her and he took off for their cabin at Echo Lake. Once there, he vented his anger by polishing off half a quart of vodka then going a few rounds with the cabin - plates ricocheted off walls, chairs were broken and framed family photos smashed. Unable to find any peace, he decided to drive back to the city for a final showdown with Caryn. It was not a showdown but it was final as he found Caryn dead, her nude body by their hot tub. Knowing that he had nothing to do with his wife's death, Stuart was frank when interrogated by Sergeant Devin Juhle, admitting that they were not getting along and that she had asked for a divorce. Further, her death will make him a millionaire three times over. To Juhle, if a wife is murdered, the spouse did it. Thus, he has not doubt that Stuart is guilty - all he has to do is prove it. Upon the advice of his good friend, California Assemblyman Jedd Conley, Stuart hires Gina as his attorney. She jumps at the chance even though she has never defended a murder case. However, as she comes to know Stuart there are a few unpleasant surprises in store for her - he has twice been arrested for domestic violence, he spent a few days alone at the family cabin with Caryn's attractive sister, Debra, a young girl living across the street from Stuart swears she saw him come home at the time Caryn was killed. As the investigation proceeds it appears that a recent invention of Caryn's awaiting FDA approval may have had something to do with her death. But, who would and perhaps more importantly who could have killed her? Lescroart treats listeners to some of his trademark crackling courtroom scenes, and a surprising, satisfying finish,. In addition, he leaves us to ponder whether or not we are really believed innocent until we're proven guilty. Don't miss this one! - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    interesting legal thriller

    When he returns to his San Francisco home following a weekend at Tamarack Lake, outdoor author Stuart Gorman finds his naked wife Dr. Caryn Dryden dead near their hot tub. San Francisco Police Department Inspector Sergeant Devin Juhle leads the official investigation. Stuart admits to the homicide detective that Caryn asked for a divorce, that their relationship was filled with domestic trouble and confesses that he hated her at least for this weekend though he also loved her he has no alibi. More so he will receive a large life insurance settlement so his close friend, California State Assemblyman Jedd Conley recommends he obtain a lawyer because his arrest seems imminent. --- Jedd gets his pal the services of attorney Gina Roake, just back from sabbatical following personal tragedy. Though her ego is lifted by being chosen, Gina wonders why her when her client and senator could choose anyone in the city. Still she quickly sends investigator Wyatt Hunt to see if someone can affirm that Stuart was in the Sierra Nevada lake at the time of death and to look closely into Caryn¿s medical career to see if that had something to do with her homicide. The media accuses Stuart of drowning his wife, which sends the accused on the run making the case that much more difficult to defend as the jury is already tainted before the trial has begun. --- This is an interesting legal thriller with a partner in Dismas Hardy¿s firm taking the lead on defending the client, convicted by a press frenzy before he even reaches the courtroom. The story line is fast-paced with interesting court scenes and a solid investigation into Caryn¿s professional connections. Though the ending seems implausible especially the post game twist and to dependent on an opening that Perry Mason would avoid, John Lescroart entertains his fans with this exciting tale. --- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2010

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