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Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of the World Today, or Six Good Reasons to Stay Homeand Bolt the Door

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2006

    It's Not Eats, Shoots & Leaves, But It's Still Good

    Lynne Truss is the defacto writer on manners, be it of grammatical manners (EATS, SHOOTS & LEAVES) or the day to day displays toward our fellow man. It¿s troubling with today¿s youth growing up so fast. The ¿F-words¿ leap from their mouths as quickly as winds in a hurricane and Ms. Truss gives us ¿six good reasons¿ why the world has become so self-absorbed and mindless of others. Broken down into six chapters, the book could be perceived as a treatise known as `The Fall of the House of Manners.¿ The first chapter, `Was That So Hard To Say¿, focuses on the absence of the words ¿Thank you¿ and ¿Please¿ in modern society. Ms. Truss gives us an example by showing a young person working behind a counter who doesn¿t really want to be doing this kind of job. The ¿Oh God, what do you want¿ look that many such people have. The second chapter, `Why Am I The One Doing This¿, discusses the abuse of non-peopled automated systems like computers and telephone answering services. ¿If I¿m paying for this product, shouldn¿t I get a real person to talk to?¿ Ms. Truss complains. Chapter three, `My Bubble, My Rules¿, talks about how everyone has an iPod or headset of some kind (usually a phone) and this creates our own little bubble world. We overhear intimate discussions on the train ride home and the person we¿re overhearing doesn¿t seem to give a flying Eff! Chapter four, `The Universal Eff-Off Reflex¿, points out that if we mention any of these poor behaviors to the offender, we¿re most likely to get a middle finger in our faces and the commonly used ¿Eff-off¿ combo. Ms. Truss notes, too, that the ¿F-word¿ is becoming so commonplace now that it will probably go out of style soon. Chapter five, `Booing The Judges¿, is in reference to our misconstrued beliefs that we have the right (somehow) to judge every person we see. Don¿t we have civil servants for that? Or referees? Chapter six, `Someone Else Will Clean It Up¿, discusses our society¿s lack of responsibility and how our leaders aren¿t helping matters much. All of this contributes to our bad manners. Similar to `America The Book¿ by Jon Stewart, this nonfiction title is laid out like a textbook but has some excellent examples of past and present thinkers (from Yeats to Homer Simpson). Although not an excellent read, it certainly made me take notice of manners. I can¿t help but cringe when someone lets the grocery store door slam closed on a person with a walker, or yells at someone on their cell phone for missing a date or screwing up this or that. And I think that¿s a sign of a good book: it made me pay attention. `Talk To The Hand¿ got its message across to me loud and clear.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    FIGHTING RAMPANT RUDENESS WITH WIT AND WRY REMARKS

    If memory serves, I described Lynn Truss's first audio book, 'Eats, Shoots & Leaves' as great good fun and the author as having an unstoppable, irresistible wit. I'll gleefully use the same description for 'Talk to the Hand,' the indefatigable author/observer's take on modern manners - more accurately the lack thereof. Yes, Truss is highly amusing. Perhaps more importantly she's on target. Granted, Emily Post most certainly wouldn't have discussed etiquette in Truss's manner, but Ms. Post was a bit tedious. That adjective can never be applied to Truss as she sets out six reasons for today's rampant rudeness. First of all, are the simple words 'thank you' and 'please' difficult to pronounce? Truss believes their lack of use is due to our self absorption. Next she tackles the multiplicity of choices indicating that they are a source of befuddlement for us. Thus, we create our own small universes which leads to alienation. Our use of personal space is also on her no-holds-barred agenda noting those who talk during movies or share their personal lives with the world via in public cell phone conversations. Truss continues by positing that for many criticism is totally unacceptable. Instead we blame others for whatever has or has not occurred. This she calls the 'Universal Eff-off Reflex.' The older I get the more I appreciate her decrying the lack of respect - whether for elders, officials, professions or property. Finally, she mentions the loss of feeling that we are a part of something larger than ourselves - a city, a church, a state, our world. It's a special treat to hear Truss deliver her whacks at the inconsiderate in her very British voice, totally in charge and direct. Don't miss this one! - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2006

    boring book...

    This boring book was worse than the blog sites I read on Blogspot. This book was like a series of boring blog entries where the author was whining and venting in a very immature fashion, not to mention that it was not well-written. The author obviously came up with the idea of this book from reading blogs, but she went overboard with her ranting and complaining. It was too boring to even finish.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2006

    Lynn Truss is cruel

    Because my mother died from celiac disease diagnosed too late, I was very disheartened to see that Lynn Truss mentioned gluten intolerance in such a disparaging way in her book 'Talk to the Hand.' I was diagnosed four years ago after having suffered with celiac disease (also called gluten intolerance) for most of my adult life. The disease caused severe damage to my intestinal track, a horrific skin condition, severe weakness, incapacitating nausea, insomnia, and cognitive dysfunction. For children, this disease is a nightmare. It causes them severe learning and behavioral problems, short stature, delayed puberty and can also attack the brain, the nerves and the liver. It is difficult enough to negotiate this disease without someone like Ms. Truss heaping her bile on top of what I have to put up with every day.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2005

    Why did the become a book?

    Following the success of Eats, Shoots & Leaves I guess they let Lynn Truss write about anything. Why not let me ramble on for two hundred pages in American English slang that no one in Britain would understand? I could tell the world in a whiny little way what bothers me the most.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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