Customer Reviews for

Talking Walls

Average Rating 3.5
( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    Talking Walls

    ¿People all over the world have been using and building walls for thousands of years. These walls tell many fascinating stories.¿ Talking walls is a great book that familiarizes readers with different cultures. It begins with the Great Wall of China and a little history about China. ¿Some say the Great Wall was built to keep our invaders. Other say it was built to keep the Chinese at home.¿ Next it describes many of the paintings that ¿tell stories of the Aborigines¿ loves of the land and of how they and their ancestors have always taken good care of the earth.¿ The book goes onto talk about Jewish, Hindu, and Indian history, tales, and myths. The writer, Margy Burns Knight, is trying to make the point that the markings on walls tell much deeper stories than what meets the eye. Another wall mentioned in the book was the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, in Washington, D.C. This wall bears the names of numerous men who fought and died for their country. Around the wall are flowers and letters that express the feelings of the ones left behind. I would strongly recommend this enlightening book for children to read. It is very educational and interesting. Margy Burns Knight is a mother and an English-as-a-second language teacher. She was also a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria and a teacher in Switzerland. Margy Burns Knight strongly wants students to have a geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures. This passion is what led her to write this book. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Maine: Tilbury House, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Informational Literature

    What would a world be without walls? Well, it wouldn¿t be a whole lot because a lot of the history of the world is represented by different walls all over the world. Walls can tell of the different cultures and of the past of the world we live in today. The Vietnam Wall, for example, is a list of all ¿the names of American men and women who were killed or are still missing as a result of the war in Vietnam.¿ Another example is the Berlin Wall. Although it is not standing anymore, the fact that it did stand tall at a time and the fact that it was torn down symbolizes what happened during the years when Germany was separated and the fact that the country of Germany has been once again reunited as one. The entire world has its own stories to tell, and the walls of the world help to tell those stories. ¿Can you imagine a world without walls?¿ Talking Walls is a very informational book for children about the significance of different walls all over the world. Different walls are important for different reasons. Some walls contain the history of different cultures of different people dating way back into history and other walls stand as monuments to either people or events in history. Through the words and the beautiful pictures in this book, the reader can get an idea of what different cultures are like, and they can learn about the significance of walls all over the world. Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania. In 1972, she moved to Maine to attend Bowdoin College. She is an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher. She has served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria, and as a teacher in Switzerland. The reason that she wrote Talking Walls is that she wanted to educate students in both geography and other cultures. All of Knight¿s books have been illustrated by Anne Sibley O¿Brien. Margy Knight currently lives with her family in Winthrop, Maine. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992. RL: Ages 8-11, Grades 3-6

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Informational: Talking Walls

    Do walls really talk? This informational book is about different cultures, and it is written by Margy Burns Knight and illustrated by Anne Sibley O¿Brien. Margy Knight served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Nigeria, and as a teacher in Switzerland. Her concern for her students¿ need for geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures led her to write Talking Walls. Anne O¿Brien is the author and illustrator of eight toddler board books. Her illustrations in this particular book are vibrant and colorful. Throughout this book we explore different cultures and their style of art. Each wall tells a different story. A Jewish child places his prayers in the wall¿s crevices. ¿Every day crowds of worshippers from all over the world gather at the towering structure that was once the western wall of King Solomon¿s temple.¿ The paintings on Egyptian houses tell of the personal journey to Mecca. Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Maine: Tilbury House, 1992. Reading level: 2nd-5th grade

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    talking walls

    Talking Walls is a great example of the historical genre. It gives the history of many walls that have been erected in different countries. It also tells of various artworks that have been put on these walls. Each page is a reflection of history. I liked the last page that asked, ¿Do you know about other walls? Are they visible or invisible? Are they monuments? Do they tell stories? How are walls built? Do they need to stay up or come down? Do you build walls? Would you tear them down? Can you imagine a world without walls?¿ This lets the reader reflect on what they just read and it could also be used to further a lesson. Margy Burns Knight was born and raised in Pennsylvania and then moved to Maine to attend Bowdoin College. She and her family reside in Winthrop where she is an ESL teacher. Knight, Mary Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House. 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    An informational book about the significance of walls around the world

    Throughout the world and history different walls have been built. Some show significant events of tribes, while others pay remembrance to those who have died for our country. Talking Walls by Margy Burns Knight explores different parts of the world and the walls that were built. Some of the places mentioned are The Great Wall of China, the Aborigine Wall Art, the Lascaux Cave, and the Western Wall. Each place place a crucial part in history. For instance, the Wailing Wall, the author tells readers that, 'Many Jewish people lament that their temple was destroyed more than two thousand years ago. One of their prayers is that it will be rebuilt one day. The explores the different purposes of walls, good and bad, and what would happen if we removed them. Margy Burns Knight is an English-as-a-Second-Language teacher from Winthrop, Maine. Her inspiration for Talking Walls is from her Peace Corp trips around the world. These trips have driven her to writting books to teach children the need for geographical knowledge and understanding of other cultures. I really enjoyed reading this book. In school, we may have covered only one or two of the walls mentioned in the book, however, the others were unknown to me. While they may have not changed the world, they have allowed us to know about different cultures and religions. Many children may not get the chance in school to learn about some of the amazing places in the book, but with this book they will have that chance. This book is a wonderful informational piece that will open the eyes of many people to the world. The illustrations by Anne Sibley O'Brien done an amazing job depicted the places in the book. My favorite is the vetern's wall, showing everything reflections, to the sorrow that the lose of a loved one has caused. Children everywhere will be lucky to read this book. Grade Level: 4th Knight, Margy Burns. Talking Walls. Gardiner: Tilbury House, Publishers, 1992.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Interesting

    I do not like history but I think that this book makes certain facts in history interesting. You learn about all of the many different types of walls all over the world.

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