Customer Reviews for

Talking with Young Children about Adoption

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    Really like this book..the first part has a lot of detailed info

    Really like this book..the first part has a lot of detailed information on different adoption studies. The 2nd part of the book contains stories from parents showing how they talked to their children. It really shows that every child/family is different and gives lots of ideas.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is really a wonderful resource for adoptive parents. It provides so much insight into how children process adoption: what their thoughts, questions and worries are at different developmental stages. This is a book that will help parents discuss adoption with their children and present it as a wonderful way of building families, while acknowledging the inherent loss and grief associated with adoption. The book includes real examples of conversations between children and their parents and/or peers, that are very useful. Christine Mitchell, author and illustrator of Welcome Home, Forever Child: A Celebration of Children Adopted as Toddlers, Preschoolers, and Beyond

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2003

    Authoritative and enlightening

    Both authors instilled confidence in me because they themselves are adoptive mothers and are seeing the issue from the inside out. I wish I had had a book such as this when we adopted our child in 1969 at age 4 days. I was completely in the dark as to when and how to tell our little girl about her adoption. I only knew that she had to be told and presumed that it should be as early as possible. Watkins's and Fisher's book give the adoptive parent(s) helpful guidelines in understanding (anticipating) the young adoptee's questions and concerns and are encouraged to be as natural as possible talking to their children any time the children bring up the topic. I would like mention one research study that tells us when we can expect adoptees truly to understand the notions of birth and adoption. In their book, Openness in Adoption, Exploring Family Connections, Harold D. Grotevant and Ruth G. McRoy found that the mean age of children NOT understanding the meaning of adoption is 5.8, age range 4.9-8.8; the mean age of children fusing the two concepts of adoption and birth is 6.4, age range 4.7-9.6; only at the mean age of 7.5, age range 4.7-12.9, do children clearly differentiate between adoption and birth as alternative paths to parenthood and accept that the adoptive family relationship is permanent, but do not understand why; children at a mean age of 8.9, age range 5.4-11.9, differentiate between adoption and birth but are unsure about the permanence of the adoptive parent-child relationship. The children at this age fear that the natural parents might reclaim them. At the mean age of 9.5, age range 6.6-12.6 the children vaguely understand that their relationship with their adoptive parents is permanent because a judge, lawyer, doctor or social worker signed some papers. Only at the mean age of 10.5, age range 8.0-12.1, is the adoption relationship fully understood with its characterized permanency. Gisela Gasper Fitzgerald, author of ADOPTION: An Open, Semi-Open or Closed Practice?

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