Customer Reviews for

Teacher Man: A Memoir

Average Rating 4
( 94 )
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(39)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2006

    America's Teacher Man

    Teacher Man is an inspiring novel about a man pursuing his dream of becoming an English teacher. Beginning his first year teaching he slowly figures out universal secrets of becoming the ultimate teacher. He almost gets fired during his first few days Frank McCourt overcomes these difficult times and continues with his teaching. After switching to numerous schools Frank found the school which suited him best. Between the different cultures of students he had varieties of difficult situations, for them to overcome their problems along with Frank. Because of the different cultures he had to face, Frank was able to overcome his fears and stand with confidence in front of the classroom. Gaining control of the classroom was one of the biggest accomplishments Frank overcame. A major theme of the novel is to be yourself. This is important because showing people who you actually are shows them you are not afraid therefore are confident they will be able to uphold a relationship. He displays this by first going into a new classroom timid, but then after a while he feels he has the freedom to show the class he is open to new and exciting ideas. Once he had started to loosen up he rambled on about things that are not relevant to English. This book is highly recommended because it shows everyone to learn to be happy with themselves and not change for anyone. Another recommended book would be 'Tiss and Angela¿s Ashes which are novels Frank McCourt has also written. The overall rating is completely outstanding.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2008

    Teacher Man

    It had been awhile since I had read Frank McCourt. I had read the rivoting accounts known as Angela's Ashes and 'Tis, and my son purchased this book for me on the chance I would be interested in a 3rd installment. Teacher Man has brought me back to the reason I love reading: Frank McCourt's ability to create a moving account of experience with humor and honesty. While I read, he is a friend telling a story, teaching a lesson, and sharing pain. Thank you, Mr. McCourt, for another glimpse into your brilliance in simplicity.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2007

    A reviewer

    Frank McCourt's poignant account on his experiences as a teacher is sure to open the eyes of those living in mere oblivion or outright ignorance those who think teaching is 'easy' and 'so what if teachers are underpaid, they get all those days off'. He falls nothing short of genius and his words are undoubtedly captivating. This book is surely one of the year's best, and it's truth --that teachers are society's unsung heroes-- promises to reach even the most stoic of people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2007

    A persistent man!

    This man is a true survivor. I feel like I know him, since he continues to expose his vulerabilies to us in his writings. In his books, I followed him from his birth in America, through his very rough childhood and adolescence in Ireland, then back to America. I love the way he shares with us his insecurities and takes very little credit for his successes. In Teacher Man,it seemed as though his life as a teacher was one big experiment that seemed to work for him and most of his students. I always thought that teachers had all the answers. What folly! I am a nurse and I certainly don't have all the answers either.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2005

    A gem

    Frank McCourt is without a doubt one of the most skilled and entertaining writers I have ever encountered in my many years of reading for pleasure.His intelligence, wit, sparing prose, (no excess verbiage), e.g.'At thirty I married Alberta Small....' That's all we hear about Alberta until occasional mentions creep out during the rest of the book to help the reader get to know Alberta. Another example is 'My Papa's Waltz' by T.Roethke,a poem used in one of his lessons. It is such a moving poem in so few words. McCourt's kindness and sensitivity towards his students, together with his unique teaching style,makes me wish all teachers were as talented. Learning would be enjoyable for every student.I am glad I read Angela's Ashes first. It gave me an understanding of how Frank McCourt evolved. Apart from his teaching career, his personal life is facinating-that old Irish guilt thing rears its ugly head and makes for many funny stories.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2005

    Right up there with Ashes...

    This memoir cannot possible receive less tham 5 stars. Whether you are familiar with McCourt's background or are a first time reader, this books grabs you and it's hard not to race to get to the end. Then when the end comes, disappointment sets in, for you realize you have devoured it too soon. The fact that McCourt chooses to view his life with humor rather than drama is a treat for us all...all of us who 'get it'.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2005

    This book stands on it's own

    Although this book is being hailed as the end of Mr. McCourt's trilogy, I think that is really not the case. Each book stands on its own. You don't have to read the first two to enjoy this third. I have read all three and enjoyed each one. This book gives those of us who aspire to be become writers, hope in our future if we just follow McCourt's advice. He makes it sound easy, but of course, it isn't. I predict that Frank McCourt will go on to win prizes for writing this book as he did with the other two.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2012

    Awkward

    Cookies

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Amazing

    In my opinion, his best work.

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  • Posted September 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great teaching tool!

    I found this to be an excellent teaching tool for myself and for presentation to my students. Frank McCourt was a good teacher, but he also had to learn about being a teacher. Good reading, and I was inspired to read his other books, as well.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Another fine work by McCourt

    I had somehow overlooked this book in the years since it was published. McCourt's obituary in the Times mentioned it so I ordered it and his other two books, just to update my library.
    Teacher Man is fascinating. A study of a man driven to teach who uses his life experience to entertain and cajole students to learn, listen and ultimately to write. The book held my interest and I found myself laughing out loud at some of the antics McCourt pulled in his classroom. And sympathizing with him when there was a bad day or a failure to reach a promising student. Like his first two books, Teacher Man is driven by McCourt's singular voice and wit. I'll admit he charmed me even through a few rough spots in the narrative. A book well worth the price and the time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2006

    Great, just like his others

    From the start, when McCourt got in classroom trouble, he told the stories of his formerly Irish life and the students listened. In the beginning he thinks these stories, and his other classroom solutions, are mistakes. He even confesses to feeling doomed during his NY teacher's exam. (When trapped then he suggests the students write a suicide note.) But he passes and he gets to experience all of those frustrating years in 'trade schools.' Eventually he ends up at Stuyvesant High with kids who were prepared to learn what he was prepared to teach. At Stuyvesant his 'betters' saw themselves as colleagues and knew enough to trust him to stimulate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    GIVE THIS ONE AN A+

    Don't miss this book. Frank McCourt truly writes from the heart. His experiences with the New York school system is enlightening for everyone -- whether or not they've completed their schooling in this part of the country. You won't want to miss this excellent read -- the characters come alive and you're either laughing or crying at the anecdotes presented by the teacher or his students. Thanks, Frank, this one is truly a winner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2006

    Audio version -- a must!

    I am a book addict. I own and have listened to all three of Mr. McCourt's audiobooks. His writing and even more so --- his reading of the books has touched my soul like no other book I have ever read. He is, I believe, one of the greatest writers of our time. If you love Frank McCourt's books, I would only say that if you fail to listen to the audio versions -- you are missing so much!!! His voice is wonderful --- so much so that I cried when the last words of Teacher Man were uttered --- I was absolutely shaken and so moved by the beauty of this man's soul.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2006

    Enjoyable, Honest.

    As a student preparing for a career in teaching English, I couldn't have enjoyed this book more. This an honest account of the hardships, failings, and glories of teaching- living too. Each chapter is another story, another small piece of this man's life as a teacher written in enjoyable prose. I strongly recommend this book to anyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2006

    Audio book--a delight!

    Ordinarily, I do not listen to audio books. Fortunately, my wife entrapped me with this one on a long trip. What a delight to hear someone relate without a political agenda what teaching should be and in what respect we should holding our teachers. The audio is the author's voice, with his concerns, his joys, his sincerity. This may be the only audio book you listen to but it will keep your attention and give you great pleasure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2005

    Fabulous, Honest Memoir

    As an English teacher/writer, I can understand and commiserate with F. McCourt's experiences in the classroom. What a saint, and what a creative teacher. He is exactly the type of teacher we would all want, or the type of storyteller we'd all want to have a pint with at a pub. Teachers get blamed for far too much these days. McCourt shows what the (high school) classroom is like - and how to handle it. Teaching is hard work, not for the faint-hearted, and so is writing. This reader is glad he finally found the time to write!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2005

    Worth the wait!

    I knew this book was coming out, I just got it in the mail and I read it in two days. If you like memoirs...you'll love this book. If you like stories that take place in the inner city you'll love this book. I guarantee this will be a movie with in the next few months. It has to be. A+

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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