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Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2004

    FLAWED HERO

    I enjoyed this book, but was disappointed to find that Ted wasn't a very nice person in some respects. He was however a giant in some aspects of his life however, such as his empathy for minorities, people who were ill, & loyalty to friends. The book is lengthy but keeps your interest to the very end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2004

    Ted Williams revealed

    Imagine when you are 10 years old and you make the prediction you're going to be the best hitter who ever lived. That's a pretty bold statement. Ted Williams turned into being a pretty bold man. Leigh Montville digs into the life of Ted Williams to discover what mental makeup it takes to become the best. We find out Williams' case, it was at the expense of his family. Montville's book is an honest portrayal of a baseball icon. He was larger than life -- but he was still human. Monville is not afraid to show the flawed side of Teddy Ballgame. Failed marriages and neglect of his children and a cantankerous demeanor many-a-day is revealed intimately in the book. Yet, he also shows the sweet side of Ted Williams and his devotion he had with children with cancer. Williams was a complicated man for people to understand. The reason was because he wasn't going to conform to what he was 'supposed to do'. Leigh Montville's book is a must if you're a sports fan and maybe even more so if you are not.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2004

    The Life of a Flawed Perfectionist

    I was fortunate enough to see a pre-release copy of this interesting book. Montville clearly admires his subject yet gives an honest account of the human flaws that characterize Williams just as much as his baseball heroics. As a result, his book is far more engrossing than the usual compilation of statistics that comprise the bulk of biographies of America's sports heroes. It is clear that to his fans, although by no means perfect, Williams is immortal.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Biography!!

    This is a fantastic book. It does not attempt to simply worship Ted, it presents him as he was - warts and all. Indepth and thorough, but a quick read. Highly enjoyable and frequently entertaining, you will both admire and feel some disgust towards Ted. By the end you appreciate what an amazing talent and how shockingly tender hearted a man he was.

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  • Posted November 21, 2010

    Worth Reading Not Excellent (Spoiler Alert)

    Growing up I have always been a Red Sox fan. Yet in this period of time Ted Williams just did not have the draw of guys like David Ortiz, Dustin Pedroia, and Jason Varitek. That is until I realized that Teddy Ballgame might be the best Red Sox player to every live. In Ted Williams The Biography of an American Hero Leigh Montville certainly does him justice. It is superbly written and Montville did an excellent job of including everything about William's life. However the fact that it is so complete is also the books main problem it struggled to hold my attention. It rambled about how Ted really enjoyed fishing in the Florida Keys and in New Brunswick, New Jersey he even missed the birth of all of his children because he was on fishing expeditions. I feel the book should have focused on the part of WIlliams' life he is famous for, his playing days, instead of his life before and after baseball. The other major issue that I had with this book was it at times portrayed Williams as a deadbeat. He was a terrible husband, used profanity like most people use pronouns, and was a womanizer. That to me means Williams is most definitely not a hero which stands in contradiction to the books title. Even though Williams was not always a great man; I again think Montville should have focused on his gaudy numbers and aura rather than his inability to be a good father. Still it is commendable that WIlliams sacrificed 6 years of his career to serve in the military. That plus his Hall of Fame baseball career is what I think Montville meant when he called Ted an American Hero. The ending is a bit sad as Williams was taken advantage of in his old age and the moral is that we all get old eventually however it wrapped the book up nicely. Overall the book is good but not great it rambles and does not talk enough about Williams' playing days in my opinion. If you are looking for a book that glorifies the Splendid Splinter and details how he saved baseball this is not it.

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  • Posted January 9, 2009

    A Troubled Legend

    Ted Williams is one of the greatest hitters of the 20th century. Starting with his birth in San Diego author Leigh Montville tells of Williams' troubled childhood and how he found baseball. One day while playing for the Pacific Coast League, he was found by the Boston Red Sox. He was only 21 years old when he debuted for the Red Sox and he immediately became one of the biggest stars in baseball. His most memorable season perhaps is 1941 when he had a batting average of 406, a record which hasn't been touched for 67 years. Then he went into service with the Navy during World War II and lost nearly 3 years of playing time. He returned in 1946 liked he didn't miss a beat. He dominated the plate for nearly the next 15 years, as he retired in 1960. He then took up a life of fishing and relaxation in the Caribbean Islands. He was married three different times and had three children, John Henry Williams and Claudia Williams. He was an abusive father and hated the press. He then found the true love of his life in Louise Kaufman. While he was on a fishing trip in Canada he was told that Louise had slipped into a coma and died. Ted was the one who signed the papers to take her off life support. Louise's death upset Ted so much that he had a stroke, causing him to loose nearly half his vision. He ended up having a total of three strokes in the space of ten years. After the third stroke nearly 75% of his vision was gone. His son, John, had him have rehab on his right hand so he could sign baseballs for John's baseball shop. William's health just kept getting worse and he eventually passed away on July 5th, 2002. His son decided that it would be best for his abusive father to be refridgerated in a cryonic warehouse in Scottsdale, Arizona. During the procedure accidently severed his head from his body. Many people thought it was a disgrace for the greatest hitter of all time to have his head and body separately frozen in a cryonic warehouse. His children would soon fight each other in court for the right to their father's body, but John won. Even through all the commotion in the life of Ted Williams he was still the greatest hitter of all time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2005

    The Ultimate Biography Of A Legend

    This is a phenominal book that outlines the life and career of 'The Splendid Splinter.' The book captures all that was Ted Williams from his childhood to his baseball career to his stints in the service. A MUST READ for all baseball fans and historians.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2004

    Amazing

    I was fortunate to have the opportunity to read an advance copy of this biography. As a lifelong Red Sox fan who is too young to have seen Ted play, the research Montville did allowed me, and more than likely a whole new generation of fans, to understand what a hero this man was. Amazing!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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