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Tell to Win: Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story

Average Rating 4
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Storytelling to achieve success.

Peter Guber's career encompasses a wide wide variety of experiences in the entertainment industry. Using those experiences and personal ones as well, he brings a great deal of insight on what made him successful but also outlines the techniques he learned and used to ge...
Peter Guber's career encompasses a wide wide variety of experiences in the entertainment industry. Using those experiences and personal ones as well, he brings a great deal of insight on what made him successful but also outlines the techniques he learned and used to get him where he is now. In particular, his use of storytelling to deliver his message and elicit his a call to action for his audience is Tell to Win's focal point. Peter Guber brings his knowledge about storytelling and its real life applications to succeed at your own goals. Peter goes over the fundamental ideas present behind storytelling and shows that it's something achievable for everyone. He does this by sharing a lot of great personal stories featuring well known names such as Frank Sinatra, Will Wright, Bill Clinton, The Dalai Lama and others. All of his stories tie into the basic principles behind storytelling that he feels are essential in order to be successful in your career and life. Again, these top-level ideas for readers to implement in their daily lives as they try to achieve something. Don't go into the book expecting a detailed step-by-step plan. Overall, the book is a fun read that combines a wealth of Peter Guber's personal experiences with people you probably admire and more than enough lessons to learn regardless of background.

posted by T_Alam on March 2, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Make Presentations With Tales Not Stats

This book gives great advice. When trying to sell someone on a point, don't try to dazzle them with data and Powerpoint slides. Instead, illustrate your point by using a compelling tale. After all the human brain retains more information from a story and has a larger at...
This book gives great advice. When trying to sell someone on a point, don't try to dazzle them with data and Powerpoint slides. Instead, illustrate your point by using a compelling tale. After all the human brain retains more information from a story and has a larger attention span than by giving lists of facts.

Peter Guber was a big executive in the entertainment business being head of Sony Pictures. He should know what types of persuasion can help cinch a deal. Throughout his book he gives stories of dealing with powerful people in the entertainment field and presenting proposals by starting with a tale that has a catchy opening, a compelling storyline and a call to action at the end. This advice is presented at the beginning of the book and it is great advice.

The reasons that I didn't give this book more than 3 stars:
- Guber repeats his advice and examples of how storytelling worked ad naseum throughout the book. A much briefer book with a few examples would have sufficed.
- It seems he wants to impress with some of the names involved in the tales. For instance he tells a tale involving Michael Jackson feeding his pet snake live mice. Why did this have to be Michael Jackson? Just about anybody knew someone growing up that had a pet snake that needed to eat mice. The author insists on this name dropping from the start and has a long list bibliography of the famous people mentioned in the book at the very front, before the first chapter starts. Why is this not an appendix?
- Some of his tales are not "compelling" as he suggests they should be.
- Most of us will never be sitting in front of the Mayor of Las Vegas with a proposal for a minor league baseball stadium. Thus some of his examples are irrelevant.

Still there are some good lessons to be learned from the book and I suggest it be scanned. Reading it from cover to cover is somewhat monotonous.

posted by Kataman1 on February 18, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted March 2, 2011

    Storytelling to achieve success.

    Peter Guber's career encompasses a wide wide variety of experiences in the entertainment industry. Using those experiences and personal ones as well, he brings a great deal of insight on what made him successful but also outlines the techniques he learned and used to get him where he is now. In particular, his use of storytelling to deliver his message and elicit his a call to action for his audience is Tell to Win's focal point. Peter Guber brings his knowledge about storytelling and its real life applications to succeed at your own goals. Peter goes over the fundamental ideas present behind storytelling and shows that it's something achievable for everyone. He does this by sharing a lot of great personal stories featuring well known names such as Frank Sinatra, Will Wright, Bill Clinton, The Dalai Lama and others. All of his stories tie into the basic principles behind storytelling that he feels are essential in order to be successful in your career and life. Again, these top-level ideas for readers to implement in their daily lives as they try to achieve something. Don't go into the book expecting a detailed step-by-step plan. Overall, the book is a fun read that combines a wealth of Peter Guber's personal experiences with people you probably admire and more than enough lessons to learn regardless of background.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 2, 2011

    Simply Superb

    In Tell to Win, Peter Guber demonstrates that telling purposeful stories is the best way to persuade, motivate and convince who you want to do what you need" - President Bill Clinton

    Exactly!

    Peter Guber sites an number of sources from Chad Hurley, Larry King, and Steven Spielberg and uses these illustrious sources as a means to explain to the reader the power of narrative as a means of self empowerment.

    Great book with a great lesson!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2011

    True Stories!

    Peter Guber's "Tell To Win" is an amazing book! Filled with stories from well know experts in all fields from Sports to Social Media and Politics. It's a quick and inspiring read and will have you re-thinking your next cocktail party conversation for sure!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2011

    Wonderfully Informative

    Once you start reading you wont stop. As an MBA student, I bought and read it looking for tips and first hand accounts on success. What I got was so much more than that. Great book, great read, great buy!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    A game-changing business book

    Over 10,000 business books are written each year, and the message of many could be summed up in an essay. "Tell to Win" is not that book. It provides an amazing overview into the success of Hollywood executive Peter Guber's varied and highly successful business life - as well as an overview into the success of dozens of other highly successful people - who all cite their ability to use narrative as a cornerstone in their success. The book's premise is that we are all hard-wired for "state of the heart" technology through the millenia of evolution - that we all tell stories, and that we all learn, communicate, persuade and live via this approach.

    However, it's when we tell a purposeful story - that we are motivated to tell, that connects with our audience in an authentic way, that resonates emotionally so our audience can pay it forward and has a strong call to action - that's when we succeed. Great book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    How do you "Tell to Win"?

    Peter Guber, has shared a series of life stories which are funny, poignant and powerful to get us to try to understand the importance of emotionally connecting to your audience. The book intertwines famous and not so famous people and their stories in a "how to" tell stories that transport and motivate others.

    It is an easy read and has a purpose.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    Want to tell a good story? Want to hear some good stories?

    I really think the range of uses is vast, in terms of being able to artfully tell a story and achieve success at the goal in hand Peter has done just that. Some of the stories Peter tells about his personal experiences which include encounters with politicians, major entertainers, and business moguls are very inspiring and really uncover the power of storytelling. Definitely take the time to read Tell to Win if you are looking to grasp people's attention while telling your stories, and make sure you take notes :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    A compelling read

    "Tell to Win" is not your typical self-help manual. It doesn't bore you with details on how to change your life for the better. Peter Guber simply draws from his life experience, for being successful in every aspect of his life. He inspires you to do exactly the same using one powerful tool that helped him along the way to achieve his life's goals, telling a story and believe in it.

    Granted the book can overwhelm considering not all of us have met, nor even came close to meeting countless celebrities, politicians, and public figures. However, this is the aspect of "Tell to Win" that gives it overwhelming credibility. It works!

    This is the kind of book you pick up if you need motivation to reach for the unreachable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    New Book out - - Tell to Win!!

    This week I found a book that has really resonated. i have only read a couple of chapters, but it really has me thinking -- deceptively simple, it's a list of interesting stories by a guy who I had never heard of. A behind the scenes person that is so fun to discover sometimes - - wow, he did that? and that?

    For decades Peter Guber it appears has been producing iconic movies that were integral parts of our culture. A real Hollywood player that most of us never new about. And that whole time he's been teaching as a professor at UCLA. And he has a TV show. And he guests on various tv and radio shows. And the people he's been hanging with range from Bill Clinton to Deepak Chopra.

    The whole message here is that it is the story and the telling of it that matters. This book is teaching by example - i was glad it did not bore me with data or pontificating. All of us can look at our daily needs, wants, activities and struggles and try to remember to apply a little of this.

    I may never find myself in front of people that are this famous - but the inspiration is what has stayed with me.

    I am looking forward to trying an approach inspired by Tell to Win on my wife soon!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very Clever, Invigorating Read

    Peter Guber is well known in the entertainment industry and that background serves him well in this immensely entertaining and clever book TELL TO WIN: CONNECT, PERSUADE, AND TRIUMPH WITH THE HIDDEN POWER OF STORY. His premise is simple and should be obvious to us all - but it is not! It is refreshing to read a book about how to succeed in life, whether business or interpersonal relationships, by connecting with our 'audience' not with a list of cold facts, figures, and predictions, but instead to gain the attention and thus caring of the audience by bringing them into the realm of identifying with a story that has permutations guaranteed to address their personal interests. In Huber's introduction he states 'For too long the business world has been ignored or belittled the power of oral narrative, preferring soulless PowerPoint slides, facts, figures, and data. But as the noise level of modern life has become a cacophony, the ability to tell a purposeful story can truly be heard is increasingly in demand.' 'The heart is always the firs target of story telling.' Guber then proceeds to explain the techniques of story telling - finding the right kind of topic to entice the listener, making the story's purpose one of encouragement to the idea of buying in to the business at hand. Each informative chapter is followed by a seperate 'aHHa' page summarizing the techniques Huber has demonstrated. The author has a smart, warm delivery and presents his thesis so well that it is difficult to think his technique would not work. And in the end it is such a pleasure to read a business help book that returns to the human side of personal interaction. Grady Harp

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 28, 2011

    Buy this book to win

    I'm going to compel you to buy Peter Guber's book by a story from it that caused me to take action in better dealing with people in my life who overwhelm me with their problems and one that has enabled me to do it with a smile.

    Guber was working at Columbia Pictures early in his career and he was being inundated with people coming into his office with every conceivable problem and like you it was driving him crazy. At that time he had the chance to meet with Jack Warner, another Hollywood icon and one of the original Warner Brothers.

    Warner told Guber, "You're the zookeeper." Guber didn't understand. Warner went on to explain, "As a boss, everyday all sorts of people will come into your office and they are bringing a monkey with them. Sometimes you can see it and sometimes it's hidden, but it's always there. And when they come in, they're trying to leave you with their monkey. If you let them do that, pretty soon your office will be filled with monkey crap. What you need to do instead is make sure that whenever someone comes into your office, that at the end of meeting with them, that you take their hand and the monkey's hand, put their hands together and send them on their way."

    Why did Guber's story cause me to take action whereas I wouldn't have if someone advised me to "set priorities, boundaries, yadda, yadda, yadda?" I realized that a story has power that logic, reason and data lack.

    So, "you're" the book buyer. Buy Guber's book and you can become the great storyteller that will enable you increase your impact at work, at home and in your life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Make Presentations With Tales Not Stats

    This book gives great advice. When trying to sell someone on a point, don't try to dazzle them with data and Powerpoint slides. Instead, illustrate your point by using a compelling tale. After all the human brain retains more information from a story and has a larger attention span than by giving lists of facts.

    Peter Guber was a big executive in the entertainment business being head of Sony Pictures. He should know what types of persuasion can help cinch a deal. Throughout his book he gives stories of dealing with powerful people in the entertainment field and presenting proposals by starting with a tale that has a catchy opening, a compelling storyline and a call to action at the end. This advice is presented at the beginning of the book and it is great advice.

    The reasons that I didn't give this book more than 3 stars:
    - Guber repeats his advice and examples of how storytelling worked ad naseum throughout the book. A much briefer book with a few examples would have sufficed.
    - It seems he wants to impress with some of the names involved in the tales. For instance he tells a tale involving Michael Jackson feeding his pet snake live mice. Why did this have to be Michael Jackson? Just about anybody knew someone growing up that had a pet snake that needed to eat mice. The author insists on this name dropping from the start and has a long list bibliography of the famous people mentioned in the book at the very front, before the first chapter starts. Why is this not an appendix?
    - Some of his tales are not "compelling" as he suggests they should be.
    - Most of us will never be sitting in front of the Mayor of Las Vegas with a proposal for a minor league baseball stadium. Thus some of his examples are irrelevant.

    Still there are some good lessons to be learned from the book and I suggest it be scanned. Reading it from cover to cover is somewhat monotonous.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2011

    Eh/Eh

    More like an analysis of what the author thinks works. Different people consume data and information in different ways. The book focuses on only 1 style of persuasion.
    Good tips if you are talking to a person/audience that consumes info in that way.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 4, 2011

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    Posted March 31, 2011

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    Posted April 11, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
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