Customer Reviews for

The Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

The question 'why' drives our faith . . .

I've read the bible and don't recall seeing the quote, 'All you need to know is in the bible.' Can anyone tell me the exact book, chapter, and verse? Ladies and gentlemen, I whole heartedly recommend this book to those who are strong in their faith and thirst to know it...
I've read the bible and don't recall seeing the quote, 'All you need to know is in the bible.' Can anyone tell me the exact book, chapter, and verse? Ladies and gentlemen, I whole heartedly recommend this book to those who are strong in their faith and thirst to know it better. It takes great preparation to question the unknown; it takes courage to question what we already believe we do know. Allow yourself to question 'why'. That is what this book is trying to do.

posted by Anonymous on November 17, 2004

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Want it both ways?

You don't read this book or the bible for facts. I find both books to be good fiction. Our human need to inspire and console, and explain without real data, has made us natural story-tellers. To argue to the contrary is sophmoric.

posted by Anonymous on July 15, 2004

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2004

    The question 'why' drives our faith . . .

    I've read the bible and don't recall seeing the quote, 'All you need to know is in the bible.' Can anyone tell me the exact book, chapter, and verse? Ladies and gentlemen, I whole heartedly recommend this book to those who are strong in their faith and thirst to know it better. It takes great preparation to question the unknown; it takes courage to question what we already believe we do know. Allow yourself to question 'why'. That is what this book is trying to do.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2005

    Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ

    Ladies & Gentlemen....this book is certainly worth anyones time to read; especially if one has an interest in ancient history, biblical or otherwise and isn't too afraid to think past this or any other 'book'. That specific examples were presented showing which specific aspects of the Christian record are also shared by other religions and that these other religions predate Christianity is very enlightening. Christianity's pagen elements are pretty well documented through the independent study by scholars and addressed here as well. It's not scarey, it's interesting. The Egyptian Isis cult & the dying and rising god cults (ie. Osiris) were something I new nothing of. Resurrection was a major theme in these BCE religions as it obviously is in Christianity. The idea here, is that the authors, as they've pointed out in the last chapter themselves, have merely collated and commented on the works of numerous others scholars independent work. They cleary draw specific parallels based upon the body of research, so the fact that they make conjecture shouldn't be a surprise. I didn't feel the authors were pretending to have a monopoly on the truth here. A hypothesis is precisely that.. most of their conjecture isn't entirely implausible either. Some parts do drag out a bit like the sections about the mystery of Baringer Sauniere and whatever the secret was on how he fell into such undocumented wealth so quickly... but worth plodding through just the same. Also, if you've read the bible, but haven't yet read any of the gnostic gospels that this book cites ad nausium...this read may spark some interest to do so.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2004

    Want it both ways?

    You don't read this book or the bible for facts. I find both books to be good fiction. Our human need to inspire and console, and explain without real data, has made us natural story-tellers. To argue to the contrary is sophmoric.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2004

    Great!!

    Excellent! But more information is provided in another book not leaked to the world by Dan Brown.I am referring to Bloodline of the Holy Grail by Laurence Garder.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Christianity With A Shock

    I finished reading this book in 2005. Its topic became current and much more popular with the excitement and criticism of Dan Brown's, The Davinci Code. It is impossible to read this treatise without being capable of opening your mind to alternative Christian theology. The authors shocking theories and heavily documented research has nothing to do with Brown's fanciful novel. But by reading this work you will be viewed by many others in a certain manner. You may be ostracized by Catholics if you speak the unspeakable notions contained therein. You will not be popular with Protestants, either. The work is well-written but sometimes dense. It can be enjoyably read, however, and has the power to make you think that alternatives in religion exist and did exist before the Conclave at Nicea. The question asked is why were these alternatives subjected to such censorship during the mid-first Millenium and subsequently so fiercely prosecuted through the Middle Ages up until the present time. Definitely worth your attention.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2006

    'True Identity' needs some scholarly basis

    For those who are 'open-minded', try reading actual accounts of Jesus' life and research on the Gospels themselves. This book does not justify any of its claims and relies on non-corroborated sources. A factual mess intended to deceive. The simplest answer to this charge of a Jesus conspiracy is in Peter Kreeft's Handbook of Christian Apoligetics. Or better yet for the open-minded, talk to a college prof who has studied NT theology.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2006

    A great read from front to back

    I like how Christians put their views in this review to say this is all conspiracy theory and none of it has been researched. They want to see proof? The bible poses no proven truths that I am aware of, it is based on faith. How funny that someone would want rock solid proof on a subject they know nothing of and then preach the next day to have faith. Typical reply from these sorts of people, I have met many in my life and ALL were multi-faced, what I mean is they preach one thing but do another...it is the 'christian' way. I like these sorts of books, I would read the bible but the storyline is quite dull. I will continue to research into this area as it is much more interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2005

    Interesting, But Questionable

    An interesting read, but fails to let you know why the Gnostic Gospels were not included in the Bible. Truth is, the Bible includes the books which parallel eachother (numerous accounts of Jesus were described by more than one disciple...which are similar...therefore corroborated). The Gnostic Gospels do not, and furhtermore have a different perspective overall than the Gospels included in the Bible. Of course, the Gnostic Gospels are not to be discounted completely. Those works chosen to be included in the bible came years after they were written, for the simple fact that Christians were persecuted for hundreds of years after Jesus' time, and this was the only time it could be accomplished in a safe manner. Oh, I'm sure most readers forget that Christians were persecuted. Why should anywone think the Gnostic Gospels are the truth? No explanantion here, huh? Can't prove it? At least there plenty of Biblicle material that parallels eachother...whereas the Gnostic Gospels do not. Jesus did say 'beware of false teachers'. I say...be careful of authors who cannot even get their 'facts' correct. That speaks volumes about what they want to brainwash you with.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2005

    Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ

    Ladies & Gentlemen....this book is certainly worth anyones time to read; especially if one has an interest in ancient history, biblical or otherwise and isn't too afraid to think past this or any other 'book'. That specific examples were presented showing which specific aspects of the Christian record are also shared by other religions and that these other religions predate Christianity is very enlightening. Christianity's pagen elements are pretty well documented through the independent study by scholars and addressed here as well. It's not scarey, it's interesting. The Egyptian Isis cult & the dying and rising god cults (ie. Osiris) were something I new nothing of. Resurrection was a major theme in these BCE religions as it obviously is in Christianity. The idea here, is that the authors, as they've pointed out in the last chapter themselves, have merely collated and commented on the works of numerous others scholars independent work. They cleary draw specific parallels based upon the body of research, so the fact that they make conjecture shouldn't be a surprise. I didn't feel the authors were pretending to have a monopoly on the truth here. A hypothesis is precisely that.. most of their conjecture isn't entirely implausible either. Some parts do drag out a bit like the sections about the mystery of Baringer Sauniere and whatever the secret was on how he fell into such undocumented wealth so quickly... but worth plodding through just the same. Also, if you've read the bible, but haven't yet read any of the gnostic gospels that this book frequently cites...this read may spark some interest to do so.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2004

    An argument built upon conjecture and presumption

    This book is a mixture of interesting history and conjecture taken to extremes. The conjectures take the forms of ¿what if¿¿..¿, ¿could it be that¿¿¿¿, ¿some say that¿¿¿.¿, ¿there are hints of¿¿¿¿¿, and similar presumptive phrases. And then, lo and behold, several paragraphs later these presumptions magically become ¿facts¿ that are then used to build up their argument about a ¿secret history¿. The text shows signs of representing a well-researched study, but the conjecture undermines much of the book; one soon becomes suspicious of their sources and references, suspecting that they have been carefully chosen to agree with and help make their argument.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2004

    You don't know him

    I gave it one star because there was not a 0 for rateing it. For those of you who write that you need to read this book, and others like it, to know Jesus, are in the dark. God said that all we need to know is in the Bible. If Jesus was married it would be stated in the bible, clearly. Jesus came to show us how to live. If he was a husband and a father it would be stated as an example for us as spouses and parents. If you took the time to get to know him these kind of books would just be fictional novels and nothing else. All we need to know about Jesus is in the Bible and knowing him is what will save us. I was in my forties when I got to know him so I know the difference between knowing and not knowing Him. What a wonderful difference

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2004

    A fascinating journey through Early Christianity and the Middle Ages

    This book, written in the order it was deciphered by its authors, is a fascinating historical detective story about the origins of European heresey from the 1st century through today. I went into this book with a very good historical background, but I was still shocked by some of the episodes in history that I was unaware of. I think the authors are careful to pose their hypothesis with the recognition that it is only a possibility, but one that merits careful consideration. If nothing else, it raises many intriguing questions about the true nature of the teachings of Jesus and how they related to the ancient Egyptian religions practiced in that time period. The book is an interesting read from start to finish, and even if you disagree with their conclusions you could appreciate the thorough nature of their investigations. A step in the right direction.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2003

    Pure Gold

    Don't pay any mind to what has been written above by these other people. This book provides much needed insight into the history of the Christian Faith. It would make an extremely profound movie. If you are interested in secret societies, then buy this book. If you are only interested in Christianity, and you for some demented reason believe you know what kind of person Jesus was, then you will be quite upset. But if you have half a brain, you will appreciate the work the author went through to produce this fine book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2002

    It can be disturbing (if you let it)

    Outrageous at times, simply in error at others; I think this book is simply a blind stab at the Christian Church. One must remember that secret societies are secret for a REASON, i.e. they are NOT the norm! Whatever one may think of Jesus he was most certainly NOT a 'sorcerer' or prankster, or polititian. The authors put a lot of stock in 'research' but they are also building a house of cards here, and with any kind of inspection the house of cards comes tumbling down.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2002

    Weak hypotheses & circumstantial evidences

    The book -while intriguing- was poisoned with weak hypotheses and tons of circumstantial facts. While their theory is obviously difficult to prove, not even their most fundamental arguments could hold water in a court of law. I was left disappointed at what could have been a much more interesting book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2000

    A book that will change your life

    Although this has been said of many book before,it is very appropriate to say as far as this book is concerned. All or most that we've known about Christianity has to be questioned after having read the powerful arguments of these two authors. Even though it challenges the status quo in matters related to established dogmas,neverthless, it immediately gives wings to one's imagination to see the world in a different way. It also gives an excellent history of secret societies of which few of us have heard at all. I enjoyed this book tremendously,and even if somebody does not agree with all the ideas in it,nobody can question the scholarly approach the authors have taken. In addition,it also can be read as a science-fiction,since it seems to be one,although based on reality.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2000

    The shifting sands of History

    History is all about perspective. I would like to thank Picknett and Prince for their perspective on the Templars, about whom nobody has the complete or full story to date. If you are interested in the Templars I would suggest that this book offers some intriguing 'perceptions' to stimulate the open mind.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2000

    Lacking in intellectual integrity.

    While there were a few interesting facts provided in this book, over all I found it annoying and insulting for the following reasons: First and foremost, it was tedious. Either the authors are incredibly thick or else they think their readers are; if you took out the parts that were repeated, almost verbatim, chapter after chapter, the volume would be cut in half. Secondly, and this is the galling part, they had a tendency to present an argument and then dismiss it out of hand with a phrase such as, 'We have seen that this is not so.' At no time do they offer even a cursory argument to support their 'verdict'. I suppose we should just take it on faith that they have a greater insight into truth!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 2