Customer Reviews for

Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

A Woman's Sacrifice: Herself

An enchanting, yet tragic story, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, has definitely shown its true Realism colors. Demonstrating how a woman's gender and status will always make society belittle her, Tess was a young maiden representing purity, natural beauty, innocence, and vir...
An enchanting, yet tragic story, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, has definitely shown its true Realism colors. Demonstrating how a woman's gender and status will always make society belittle her, Tess was a young maiden representing purity, natural beauty, innocence, and virtue. She has shown us the acts of sacrifice for love and her own sex. This story is calling out to woman everywhere, and for all history.



Tess was a woman who stood strong no matter how unlucky she had been presented as. For example, when her rich and cynical cousin Alec had seduced/raped her while she was sleeping she had still tried to go on with her life. This shows that Tess was innocent no matter what people thought about her and she only wanted to find happiness in her life. In addition, her child Sorrow had died because it was so unhealthy, but she did stay in remorse. Her baby's name also tells us that her relationship between her and Alec was built with sorrow and sadness and ended in that way.


She was also a great woman of virtue. Like from the very beginning she had protected her father from the rude gossipers, even though she knew herself that he was like that. This shows that although her family had put shame upon her, she had still treated them with respect and kindness. Furthermore, before she was about to get hanged, she asked her only true love to marry her sister. This shows, that even though she loved him, she showed no jealousy but desired what was best for him.



But most of all, Tess was a woman of sacrifice. For example, when she had stabbed Alec to death in order to gain forgiveness from Angel Clare. This shows that even death and immorality cannot withstand her overflowing romance and love for Angel. In addition, before she gets captured, she sleeps on the Stonehenge; in that time, the Stonehenge was an immoral icon. This shows that she was lying there as if she was a sacrifice to the Heathen gods and in the same way she was sacrificing her life as the police came to arrest her.



This fictional character signifies all women that have sacrificed their lives all because of men's greed and pride. Women who have tried to make a difference in this world so that maybe someone could not bias them because of their gender. But Thomas Hardy recognizes them, and asks us to recognize them too. He also aks us as Eves to continue to fight for our rights and their rights even in the 21st century, and all the centuries to come until we have finally reached our goals of being Adam's equal in all society, and in all humanity.

posted by Cougar_H on March 15, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Wonky type

There are whole paragraphs in this edition that seem not to have been transcribed well. Sentences don't make sense, punctuation is missing, weird symbols appear in random places. Sometimes a page will just end midway with no period. The next page moves on normally, but ...
There are whole paragraphs in this edition that seem not to have been transcribed well. Sentences don't make sense, punctuation is missing, weird symbols appear in random places. Sometimes a page will just end midway with no period. The next page moves on normally, but it makes me wonder what I'm missing. If this were a hard copy I would return it to the store. Not sure if that's possible with e-books.

posted by 3657663 on April 22, 2012

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  • Posted March 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Woman's Sacrifice: Herself

    An enchanting, yet tragic story, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, has definitely shown its true Realism colors. Demonstrating how a woman's gender and status will always make society belittle her, Tess was a young maiden representing purity, natural beauty, innocence, and virtue. She has shown us the acts of sacrifice for love and her own sex. This story is calling out to woman everywhere, and for all history.



    Tess was a woman who stood strong no matter how unlucky she had been presented as. For example, when her rich and cynical cousin Alec had seduced/raped her while she was sleeping she had still tried to go on with her life. This shows that Tess was innocent no matter what people thought about her and she only wanted to find happiness in her life. In addition, her child Sorrow had died because it was so unhealthy, but she did stay in remorse. Her baby's name also tells us that her relationship between her and Alec was built with sorrow and sadness and ended in that way.


    She was also a great woman of virtue. Like from the very beginning she had protected her father from the rude gossipers, even though she knew herself that he was like that. This shows that although her family had put shame upon her, she had still treated them with respect and kindness. Furthermore, before she was about to get hanged, she asked her only true love to marry her sister. This shows, that even though she loved him, she showed no jealousy but desired what was best for him.



    But most of all, Tess was a woman of sacrifice. For example, when she had stabbed Alec to death in order to gain forgiveness from Angel Clare. This shows that even death and immorality cannot withstand her overflowing romance and love for Angel. In addition, before she gets captured, she sleeps on the Stonehenge; in that time, the Stonehenge was an immoral icon. This shows that she was lying there as if she was a sacrifice to the Heathen gods and in the same way she was sacrificing her life as the police came to arrest her.



    This fictional character signifies all women that have sacrificed their lives all because of men's greed and pride. Women who have tried to make a difference in this world so that maybe someone could not bias them because of their gender. But Thomas Hardy recognizes them, and asks us to recognize them too. He also aks us as Eves to continue to fight for our rights and their rights even in the 21st century, and all the centuries to come until we have finally reached our goals of being Adam's equal in all society, and in all humanity.

    14 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2008

    A beautiful novel

    I love this book. It is actually my favorite. Tess's story is tragic, as many others have pointed out. She's manipulated, used, abused, and eventually just breaks. The story is more or less a psychological study of this poor girl. I recommend this book to everyone who ever asks me. It's beautifully written and truly a wonderful book.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2007

    A Review

    Thomas Hardy was way ahead of his time, and Tess is one of the most memorable characters in literature. One can't help but become emotionally involved and reminded of many of the problems with society that have changed little a century later.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2007

    A reviewer

    I've read this book over and over again many times during the past 10 years and each time I read it, I come away with something that I missed the previous time. I feel that Thomas Hardy is a genius and Tess is his greatest character. This story of a young woman wronged by society still rings true in our day. No matter how much women are given equal rights, it's still a man's world. Take the time to read this book and I promise that it will become one of your favourites as well.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2008

    A reviewer

    I have read Tess multiple times and looking forward to the next time, too. The enchanting scenes (when Angel carries Tess across the water) and emotionally shocking scenes (the ending, beginning with Angels return) draw you in. Yes, the novel is tragic but beautiful all the same.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 26, 2012

    This book is required reading for upper division English in Coll

    This book is required reading for upper division English in Colleges and Universities.  To call it depressing is dismissive and sophomoric .  Of course it's depressing, most Hardy novels are depressing by nature, but he examines the human condition from a vulnerable, innocent, well meaning character's point of view.  Some might feel it goes a little over the top in terms of misfortune, but I have always seen this as a testament of strength of the character.  What ironically breaks her is when utmost desperate, she commits murder, which plunges her into the depths of despair.  The use of Stonehenge as a symbol of sacrifice makes the situation all the more poignant .  Anyone who says she is bored with this needs to stop reading action novels and start looking a little deeper than 2 inches.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2012

    Very good.

    I liked the part where Tess was trying to figure out a way to support her parents after their horse died.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    If you Love the Classics...

    This is a great change of pace.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2012

    Loved this book! Truely the only book that I've actually cried

    Loved this book! Truely the only book that I've actually cried at the ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2012

    Classics are always a best choice

    I have always loved the classic writers the stories seem more fresh than contempory tales

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Beautiful, Evocative...

    What can I say-I love Hardy. Why do I love an author whose books seem to move from one heartbreak to another? He is definitely not one you read for a light pick-me-up, that is for certain. But his writing is so nuanced that it feels as if I am floating down a quiescent rural stream; I know turbulent water lies ahead-I can feel the increasing pull beneath me-yet there seems to be no urgency to try to pull away in opposition. Going there just seems to be the natural flow of life. So why do I love this man whose plots I willingly follow into the very depths of despondency? Because the prose...oh, the prose!

    Thomas Hardy is a master of every literary element. For him, setting, especially, takes on such presence that it becomes an amalgamation of every place you have ever been. All of your senses become engaged. You hear the church bells peal across the meadow. The flank of the cow against Tess' cheek feels warm and fluid beneath your own. As she toils in the field you feel the grit of harvested grain in the sweaty crease of your neck and taste its dryness in your mouth. You feel refreshed by the wind and gladdened by the birds in flight.

    When it comes to character, Hardy is the consummate teacher. We don't just know that Tess' mother is hard at work on wash day. Her weariness is palpable. We aren't told that Tess is a good daughter. She pitches in just where she is needed, time and time again. Each character, major and minor, is presented so completely through their speech and actions that the narrator need fill in very little. For me they each even acquire a distinctive voice in my head.

    So if you have shied away from Hardy for lack of interest in his wrenching plots, I urge you to give one of his novels a try and experience the power of his incomparable prose.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    One of my favorite classics! A must read for anyone who love British Literature.

    I had to read this originally as summer reading in high school. I bought the book on tape and unfortunately purchased an abridged version. Even though I only got parts of the story recited to me, I fell in love with Tess. You can't help but sympathize with her situation, and her love and devotion to Angel is inspiring. I also really like the development of Tess's character; at first, it seems as though she may remain a passive character who is easily victimized but in the end she rises above her past hurts and takes action. Since high school, I have been dying to read this novel in its entirety. Now with my new copy I can finally enjoy this classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 13, 2014

    wonderful book!!!!!!!!!!

    wonderful book!!!!!!!!!!

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    Posted April 15, 2013

     

     

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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