Customer Reviews for

The 21 Lessons of Merlyn: A Study in Druid Magic & Lore

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

A Great Masterpiece

I work with Douglas Monroe as a long-standing partner at New Forest Mex. In fact, I have trained with him for eleven years now. Throughout this long time, I have watched with a sort of morbid fascination, the controversy surrounding his work escalate until, with the pub...
I work with Douglas Monroe as a long-standing partner at New Forest Mex. In fact, I have trained with him for eleven years now. Throughout this long time, I have watched with a sort of morbid fascination, the controversy surrounding his work escalate until, with the publication of the final book in the Merlyn series in sight, I finally asked him `why he didn't directly address the points of greatest controversy?'

His answer was not surprising, having been one that I had heard in several forms over the years. And, simply put, it is this: Anything I would ever answer in my own support, has already been written into my books--- those readers who have looked deeply enough, will have found it. Those who have not, were not primed to use the book in the first place. He suggested that I read it again, and so I did. And he was right--- it was there. I quote from the suggested source:

"...lastly, let the reader be aware that the world outlined in this book is not intended for everyone... its views on religion and sexuality will only be appreciated by those for whom it is destined... and to those persons skeptical of such an approach, try it and see..." And, to me at least, this well explains his consistent reaction to public position. He will never engage in 'soap-box futility and baited word-bantering' [his own words from an email].

Lastly, I would like to re-quote a few lines from the THE LOST BOOKS OF MERLYN, a rare instance where the author published a personal reaction to critics of his work:

"...here we tackle a question [of authenticity] which has become, for some, paramount in regards to my work... let it here be stated in the records that [these] questions are without value to [me]... because my concern is not how authentic my sources are (this, one may only guess at), but how effective their philosophies and methodologies... I merely state that the [Pheryllt] manuscript, forged or original, ancient or recent, exists as an absolutely fascinating collection of writings, and that their framework works... historians and library scholars will never understand the essence of Druidism by examining mistletoe dust and monks' renditions--- only a true poet stands this chance today." [Prologue, xii/xii]

Another example of web-hype I have constantly read about: Monroe advocates poisonous Mistletoe and deadly herbalism. An amazing statement, considering any 5-second Yahoo search under "Mistletoe herbal" will reveal countless sites specializing in Mistletoe tinctures/powders and pills, which have been used for ages to treat arthritis, heart and blood problems, etc. A good example is at Mountainroseherbs.
And pumpkins (squash-like gourds) were absolutely imported into Britain as foodstuffs during their long occupation, a fact a small amount of web-search will reveal. These two examples go a long way in showing me how short-sighted Douglas's critics can be.

In summing up, I think my favorite novelist (no, it's not Douglas Monroe!) William Styron had a good response to critics of his own work, which applies equally well to Merlyn critics. He said:

"Writers have a duty to meditate on history and bring understanding through imagination."

For us, Douglas has always been an honest man with a clear message. I welcome this final book #3.

Francisco "Frank" Trias
NF Mex

posted by RDarry on October 10, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

A reviewer

The story itself is descriptive and beautiful, reminiscent of a world that might have been. The modern occult concepts taught in this book are somewhat sound, however, the 'historical' details are erroneous, and are based off of the writings of a man who wasn't even a ...
The story itself is descriptive and beautiful, reminiscent of a world that might have been. The modern occult concepts taught in this book are somewhat sound, however, the 'historical' details are erroneous, and are based off of the writings of a man who wasn't even a Celt.. then again, neither is the author. What little we know of the Celts and their leading class of Druids are hidden under a veil in other texts. The book mentioned below has a far better grasp of who the Celts and Druids were, and might shed some light where this fantasy novel doesn't.

posted by Anonymous on July 2, 2007

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2011

    A Great Masterpiece

    I work with Douglas Monroe as a long-standing partner at New Forest Mex. In fact, I have trained with him for eleven years now. Throughout this long time, I have watched with a sort of morbid fascination, the controversy surrounding his work escalate until, with the publication of the final book in the Merlyn series in sight, I finally asked him `why he didn't directly address the points of greatest controversy?'

    His answer was not surprising, having been one that I had heard in several forms over the years. And, simply put, it is this: Anything I would ever answer in my own support, has already been written into my books--- those readers who have looked deeply enough, will have found it. Those who have not, were not primed to use the book in the first place. He suggested that I read it again, and so I did. And he was right--- it was there. I quote from the suggested source:

    "...lastly, let the reader be aware that the world outlined in this book is not intended for everyone... its views on religion and sexuality will only be appreciated by those for whom it is destined... and to those persons skeptical of such an approach, try it and see..." And, to me at least, this well explains his consistent reaction to public position. He will never engage in 'soap-box futility and baited word-bantering' [his own words from an email].

    Lastly, I would like to re-quote a few lines from the THE LOST BOOKS OF MERLYN, a rare instance where the author published a personal reaction to critics of his work:

    "...here we tackle a question [of authenticity] which has become, for some, paramount in regards to my work... let it here be stated in the records that [these] questions are without value to [me]... because my concern is not how authentic my sources are (this, one may only guess at), but how effective their philosophies and methodologies... I merely state that the [Pheryllt] manuscript, forged or original, ancient or recent, exists as an absolutely fascinating collection of writings, and that their framework works... historians and library scholars will never understand the essence of Druidism by examining mistletoe dust and monks' renditions--- only a true poet stands this chance today." [Prologue, xii/xii]

    Another example of web-hype I have constantly read about: Monroe advocates poisonous Mistletoe and deadly herbalism. An amazing statement, considering any 5-second Yahoo search under "Mistletoe herbal" will reveal countless sites specializing in Mistletoe tinctures/powders and pills, which have been used for ages to treat arthritis, heart and blood problems, etc. A good example is at Mountainroseherbs.
    And pumpkins (squash-like gourds) were absolutely imported into Britain as foodstuffs during their long occupation, a fact a small amount of web-search will reveal. These two examples go a long way in showing me how short-sighted Douglas's critics can be.

    In summing up, I think my favorite novelist (no, it's not Douglas Monroe!) William Styron had a good response to critics of his own work, which applies equally well to Merlyn critics. He said:

    "Writers have a duty to meditate on history and bring understanding through imagination."

    For us, Douglas has always been an honest man with a clear message. I welcome this final book #3.

    Francisco "Frank" Trias
    NF Mex

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    The story itself is descriptive and beautiful, reminiscent of a world that might have been. The modern occult concepts taught in this book are somewhat sound, however, the 'historical' details are erroneous, and are based off of the writings of a man who wasn't even a Celt.. then again, neither is the author. What little we know of the Celts and their leading class of Druids are hidden under a veil in other texts. The book mentioned below has a far better grasp of who the Celts and Druids were, and might shed some light where this fantasy novel doesn't.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2003

    A gem of understanding the forces of nature & intuition

    I have read this book through three times now. While written as a fictional book, the author has researched druidism. The lessons teach young Authur how to tap into his intuition and understanding. He is in tune with the earth, thru a series of exercises presented by the master. For those interested in learning about druidic lore and earth magic, a wonderful, entertaining read. I did not find the author tried to impress his religion over any other, he even goes on to say that druids accept all religions with respect. The author speaks of herbs used by the druids, but I found no specific suggestions to take them, nor does it act as an herbal reference to heal. The experiences of young Authur were riveting and entertaining.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2001

    You People Are Unbelievable

    This book is a gem. It should be used by those who want to know more about Druids and their way of life and should also be used in conjunction with The Lost Books of Merlyn. They are great. And in these reviews before mine, people have called it phony, and bashing of other religions. Hogwash, I say. How can you be so positive that YOURE right?? Not as easy to answer as it is to blatantly bash that which you don't understand or don't care to. The fact is no one knows what the Druids did or did not do. So to play a self-proclaimed expert is not only proof of your idiocy, but that you're obviously a neo-pagan protecting your ways because you put so much money into it which are more man made than these books will ever be. Congratulations. And another thing, speculation is speculation. And for the pot to call the kettle black is wrong. And as for bashing Christians. Read the Bible. I can't count how many times it is said, 'The pagans have been misled,' 'I am the only way to God,' ect. Do some research before you dump all over a guy that has produced some of the best works on Druidism.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2000

    Best Book on Druidism

    First, I would like to say this is the best book I have ever read on real druidism (and I have studied AND practiced paganism for more than a decade)! What really amazes me is the fact that so many people misinterpret (or just cannot comprehend) what they read. Monroe clearly states that gourds, NOT pumpkins were used in England... and this Mistletoe thing really upsets me! PEOPLE... you make tea from Mistletoe leaves... ONLY the berries are toxic (and only slightly at that)! Read the labels on many of your herbal teas and you will discover that Mistletoe is used often. It is a sedative. I have been using it for years after first discovering it years ago when I was employed as an herbalist at a local greenhouse and nursery. As for as the actual magic is concerned... Monroe gives you clues, not spells. This book is not a spellbook for beginners... It is a course in druid magic for intermediate and advanced practitioners.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2000

    This book is one of the best books

    Douglas Monroe has outdone himself in this book. He masterfully combines the storytelling of arthurian legend with easy and enlightened lessons to train you in druidic magick. I was skeptical at first but after reading this book and trying a couple of the lessons I am skeptical no longer. BUY THIS BOOK! It will be the best move you've in a long time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 1999

    One of the best books I have read!!!!!!!!!!

    The 21 Lessons of Merlyn is one of the best books I have ever read. It explains several of the mysteries of Druidism that most people think are strange. I recommend reading this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 25, 2012

    Not even worth a full sentence of insults, and it

    Not even worth a full sentence of insults, and it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 7, 2011

    For a book based so much on "truth..."

    ... there sure is a long of incorrect information in this book. I was very excited to read this, until I started to recognize the flaws in the book; days, celebrations, etc. are attributed to the wrong Gods/Goddesses, while their origins are totally wrong as well. Once I noticed this, I began to research all about this author and the context. What I found was not pretty- it seems there is NO REAL BASIS for this book. Don't be fooled! While its stories are beautiful and reminiscent of days of old, its facts are wrong and have no actual proof of the supposed base of the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    Great book

    This book is great, it is one of the best methodes of teaching in any book I have ever read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2001

    Recommended Read

    This book provides a look, not only in a historical perspective, but also compares the legend of King Arthur and Merlin to the common myth as well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2000

    Paganistic are many peoples beliefs but should not attack others religous philosophy.

    After thoroughly reading this book, I quite enjoyed it. But, several times it seemed that attacks on other religous idea and beliefs were welcomed and introduced by the characters in the plot. Whether the author was trying too hard to express his own ideas through his characters, is a wonder to me. However, being as it is that I enoyed the aspect of Druidic magic and lore, I found it very informational and enlightening. The story is uniquely tied in to the 'lessons' it portrays and Douglas Monroe, uses his first person form to its utmost extent throughout the book, and he executed it well.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2000

    i felt the book was a good begining but was stetching the truth

    i thought that this was a good book...it was well written and the story line was very well thought out...however i felt that some liberty was taken and not everything in the book was backed up with truth...i felt the author to be writing history...he claims to be in possesion of some old manuscripts called the body of the dragon (in his 2nd book) If these manuscripts are so great then why are they not mentioned in any other books on druidry? i do not claim to know what the truth is but i felt that the book was a strain on what is natural...i would not recomend getting the second book...i found it to be a disapointment...i think the author was trying to immerse himself in the world and time of merlin a little too much...the second book should be filed under fantacy not magical studies... ~may the force be with you~ stormsparadox

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2000

    An old story. Told with some history.

    I loved learning about Christian Churches. The way one or two events. Could be told different. It will open your mind. You will look at your world in a new way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2000

    21 Lessons?

    Not too bad a book for getting the *flavour* of Druidry, I suppose, but factually incorrect, for example the author states that pumpkins were a sacred tree, when the pumpkin is a New World plant unknown to the Druids (and a vine, not a tree). Also, he recommends the ingestion of mistletoe, which is POISONOUS. Maybe good for role-playing games, not great as a serious book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2000

    The 21 Lessons of What?

    This book is a distrace! Merlyn has been made out to be something that he was not.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1