Customer Reviews for

The 48 Laws of Power

Average Rating 4
( 209 )
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(11)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

I have this as an ebook text me if you want it, 3476203448 my na

I have this as an ebook text me if you want it, 3476203448 my name is Chris.
The book takes each "law" in turn and gives historical examples of those who follow the law and fail to follow the law. You’ll quickly see that the laws of power aren’t re...
I have this as an ebook text me if you want it, 3476203448 my name is Chris.
The book takes each "law" in turn and gives historical examples of those who follow the law and fail to follow the law. You’ll quickly see that the laws of power aren’t really laws – they’re more like principles that will help you in the art of gaining and exercising power. I don’t mean to suggest that the laws are incorrect – they’re absolutely correct – they’re just not laws.

posted by Anonymous on June 5, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

27 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

Shame on those who applaud these ideas!

As a retired CEO and now university professor, I cannot disagree more strongly with the premise of this book and the tactics promoted within. The ideas expoused here are ruthless, amoral, manipulative nonsense -- a dose of pure utilitarianism for the stupid and greedy. ...
As a retired CEO and now university professor, I cannot disagree more strongly with the premise of this book and the tactics promoted within. The ideas expoused here are ruthless, amoral, manipulative nonsense -- a dose of pure utilitarianism for the stupid and greedy. Glaring examples of this twisted ethos were apparent in the management teams at Enron, Tyco, Worldcom, Arthur Anderson, Adelphia, and a host of other disfunctional corporations. The unsustainable paths these organizations chose, and the disasterous outcomes that resulted, exemplify the distorted ideas expoused in this sadly popular writing. Once again, Greene reminds us that no social question is so complex that a simple-minded solution can't be offered. For those interested in reading works on this subject with true substance, I can recommend the following: (1) 'Power, Influence and Persuasion' by Harvard Business School Press & Society for Human Resource Management, (2) 'Power and Influence' by John P. Kotter (at Harvard), (3) 'Managing with Power: Politics and Influence in Organizations' by Jeffrey Pfeffer (at Stanford), and (4) 'Power in Organizations' by Jeffrey Pfeffer (at Stanford). Reading credible and well documented books like these from genuine thought leaders will hopefully innoculate aspiring managers against the 'intellectual kitty litter' offered by Greene.

posted by Anonymous on March 23, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2006

    A reviewer

    Very dissapointing all I had to do is read the Table of Content, which gave me a hint as to the overall substance of the book-Sure every one desires power but obtaining it through ruthless devices will squash you in the end every time-one review said it is not to be taken seriously...Are you serious? we live in a world that operates in the power of light and darkness every day- Hello, focus on the the law of sowing and reaping-and what about the law of reciprocity-power is self control- not to control others or gain the control by manipulation this is clearly deception (witchcraft) this violates one's own will- to posses influennce is to have true power ones integrity and love for one another I'd advise anyone to be up on their game for anyone they come in contact with that invests in the dark principles of these 48 laws in this book. If you must read it, eat the meat of the obvious in human nature, but make sure you spit out the bones!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 16, 2011

    whats good about it

    It seem this books promotes individulism and the ways znd meanz in which people can continue dissimulation over their fellow human being. long live apartheid. when did we loss our sense of humanity .

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2011

    a disappointment

    Not much thought went into compiling this collection of disjointed ideas. The red writing is extremely annoying and hard to read!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2003

    Hope I never become like that

    Upon reading the 48 Laws (available online as well,) I would summarize my opinion of them in two things: 1. People realize that in a 'game' with infinite repetitions, these rules will not work. (A 'game' is a term from the Game Theory, and it means one or a series of interactions.) In other words, if I have to work with people over extended period of time, as in any job, these rules are useless to me. I better be nice to them, because that is the only way to reap mutual benefits from the 'game' of employment. From this angle, these laws are utterly counterproductive. 2. People who employ these laws (and some of them are contradictory to others) will eventually face a coalition of people set against them, and that is something no one wants. I realize this review has been more about the essence of the book's content, rather than about the book itself. However, in writing this review, I'd like to convey one thing: instead of scheming, rely on objective factors such as doing your job well, and let someone else get burned by employing these rules to his downfall.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2002

    Better books available

    Greene does make contradictions in this book. Also, there's really nothing new in this book. Greene also appears to be very cynical. Greene writes about preying on "victims," "suckers," and "marks." Greene states in his book that "You shouldn't trust your friends." I wonder how his "good friends," he mentions in the acknowledgements feel, considering he doesn't trust them. It sure would be scary to be this guys friend. Instead of the "48 laws of power," I would recommend David Lieberman's "How to get anyone to do anything and never feel powerless again." Despite the title, it is a far less cynical book than Greenes. Written by a psychologist, it is also much more scientific. Perhaps one good thing about Greene's book is it could make you aware of scheming people out there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2011

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    Posted August 14, 2011

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    Posted October 8, 2009

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    Posted December 13, 2009

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    Posted January 10, 2010

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    Posted February 13, 2009

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