Customer Reviews for

The Aeneid

Average Rating 4.5
( 53 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2006

    Don't be intimidated...

    I am rereading this edition after a lapse of 20 years since my first reading as a student of literature in college. I picked it up again out of curiosity, and found myself enthralled after a couple of pages. I didn't think I would want to keep this book, but it deserves a permanent place in my library. If you have any curiosity at all about The Aeneid, try this translation.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2004

    'I ask no crown/ Unpledged by Fate...'

    This Dover Edition of -The Aeneid- by Publius Vergilius Maro (Virgil or Vergil) is a 1995 reprint of the English verse trans lation by Charles J. Billson, published in London in 1906. To try to render, or match, Virgil's Latin verse, into an English verse 'equivalent' is a tough job indeed. Though, there ARE several English verse translations available in paperback format. As one reviewer already noted, there are no notes or annotations for this 'thrift edition.' This poses problems for those who lack knowledge of Roman history, knowledge of Virgil and his times, and Roman/Greek mythology. On the other hand, it can be a refreshing 'break' for those who want to simply enjoy the work itself (though not in its original language and verse format) in a readable, if somewhat stilted English verse form. The original Latin (from the Loeb Classical Library, Vol. 63) begins: 'Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris/ Italiam fato profugus Lavinaque venit/ litora--' [the prose translation by H.R. Fairclough (Revised by G.P. Goold) renders this as: 'Arms and the man I sing, who first from the coasts of Troy, exiled by fate, came to Italy and Lavine shores--'.] This English verse translation by Billson presents this same opening as: 'Arms and the Man I sing, who first from Troy,/A Doom-led exile, on Lavinian shores/ Reached Italy; long tossed on sea and land/ By Heaven's rude arm--'. This particular verse rendering, I believe, rates 4 stars, while the epic itself rates 5 stars as one of the world's great works of creative art and literature. The poem also became the ancient Roman empire's national epic (celebrating Rome's legendary ancient ancestors and her 'destined' purpose) from the time of the 1st Emperor Augustus onward.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2008

    A classic for children and all

    I didn't quite understand this when I read it at 10 years old, but then I read it again at 14, and since then I've asked all of my friends to read it. Now I'm reading this great adventure to my kids, and they love every sentence. Read this, and the Odyssey.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2004

    Cheap, but Fantastic

    Dover Thrift has long been a great resource for those of us who want to read the classics without breaking our budgets. For students like myself, it could even be referred to as a 'godsend.' Dover Thrift's version of Aeneid is a great copy to introduce one's self to the text with. It's poetic, but reasonably easy to follow. The downside is that there is no introductory commentary or footnote material, but it's still a great place to start your journey with Aeneas. The Aeneid itself is a seminal text. One way to think of it is as the text that linked together Homer and Dante: it utilizes epic conventions, but it also has an original narrative voice that would inspire Dante to follow Virgil--the character--through a fantastic, fictional hell, but also to follow Vergil--the writer's--literary example. A must-read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2003

    Wonderful Epic

    Fitzgerald's translation captures what Virgil's vision must have been. Aeneas possesses all the qualities of a true hero. I wept when I read the king's prayer as his son left for battle with Aeneas. The love felt for this son was one of the most beautiful passages I've ever read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2012

    Fagles is the best translation

    All the others tend to warp the language to fit English rhymes, or to show how clever they are. Fagles keeps a nice epic rhythm but in plain English word order (no talking like Yoda just to make it rhyme, like Dryden). You get the story and the feel of it, but in modern English.

    FAGLES or none, I say.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    Grand Slam

    A translation on par with the best of Fagles and Kaufmann's works.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2007

    The beginning of Rome

    A classic in the utmost form of the Greek warriors who began Rome and the Roman Empire.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2002

    A Must Read

    The Aeneid by Virgil was excellently translated by Fitzgerald in this classic epic/adventure. I am a Latin student, and I have read the Latin version and Fitzgerald did an excellent job with this. If you like Latin/Roman culture, this is a MUST read. Its a classic, and one of the best books ever written. I don't think there has ever been another legendary epic as good as this!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 1999

    For those who don't read Latin...

    Fitzgerald's translation of The Aeneid is considered by experts to be the best English version of Virgil's timeless epic. This is a must read for ambitious students and literature buffs. Were it not for good, dependable translations of classical works, the modern reader who knows no Latin could not explore the ideas of antiquity through the writings of its participants.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2014

    F

    My daughter loves this book even though she is 9 she can read collage books

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

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  • Posted June 11, 2014

    The Gods of VirgilThe novel The Aeneid of Virgil is a english tr

    The Gods of VirgilThe novel The Aeneid of Virgil is a english translation from a latin epic poem of Aeneas’s travel from Troy to Italy to seal his fate. Virgil divides the novel into twelve books so the events leading to are easily organized. Virgil was an ancient roman who wrote during the Augustan period, who has written Eclogues, Georgics, and The Aeneid. The Aeneid is considered the national epic of ancient Rome due to its composition to today's’ readers. Aeneas left Troy because the Greeks destroyed the empire, and he takes the Mediterranean Sea with his troops of Trojan warriors and sail to Italy. The fleet encounters strong storms which delay their arrival to Italy, they end up sailing to Carthage, where they encounter Dido, the queen and founder, who welcomes them to Carthage, which is not their only stop along the way to their fate. The Aeneid of Virgil is Aeneas long journey to arrive to Italy, but those who hold off their journey will not succeed. He keeps running into more distractions, which blinds Aeneas of his goal to reach Italy. 
    This epic is referenced from The Odyssey and Iliad, both by Homer. The Aeneid itself is a Roman myth of the discovery of Rome. The first line of the first book is, “I sing of arms and of a man.” (Virgil 1) This quote shows some of the particular ideas expressed, the battle that was lost in Troy helped Aeneas travel for his fate. The interesting idea about it is that there are many ways this war could be understood. It could just be the battle, but you also can understand how the Roman gods play a role on Aeneas’s journey. The way one person comprehends something versus anothers’ idea can be completely different, but this element of writing is compelling to readers all over the world.  A theme valuable to the epic is waiting will not help you reach your goal, procrastination or avoiding the future is a relevant problem to high schoolers everywhere who decide whether to move on to further their education, or wish to not move on. Students that work hard and understand their goals for the future have a better chance of succeeding versus someone who does not try hard enough to receive good grades. Aeneas stays with Dido for a long time at Carthage, which makes his goals unclear, but his motivation and respect for the gods help him move on to complete his fate of discovering Italy.
    The epic Aeneid of Virgil is a compelling but complex read for high schoolers and beyond who would like to understand Roman mythology and wants to strengthen their comprehension skills. The enhanced vocabulary and odd choices Aeneas makes causes confusion to readers, but the understanding that the time period is in Ancient Greece and Rome will help the reader understand that Roman gods were a major influence to leaders like Aeneas for a sign of hope or understanding. This epic at some parts can be a little dry, but it is much more enjoyable when you have a stronger understanding of the myths and ancient history. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    Excellent Translation

    By far my preferred translation. The introduction is quite useful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2008

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 53 Customer Reviews
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