Customer Reviews for

The American Dream and The Zoo Story

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2002

    Albee - Icon or Popcorn

    With deference to Mr. A for his subsequent well written plays, his first hasn't weather the test of time well. The quest to produce, direct and act in ZOO can only be described as a tribute to Mr. A by the less worldly theater person, those taught by our fine art department "theater" elites and maintain Mr. A is better than sliced bread. The dialouge of ZOO is predicatable, replete with dated images, brief hetro-homosexual references and long excruciating dialogue about a dog. The challenge then is to make something from little while fanatasizing a tribute to Mr. A, almost like building sand castles in the surf with as much reward.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2000

    20 minute synopsis of the world

    The Zoo Story was Brilliant! Edward Albee gave a metaphore of how society works, in a 20 minute play. Jerry is a 'psychotic maniac', who lives in the slums of New York City. On the way back from the zoo he encounters Peter, a well mannered gentleman. Jerry is a representation of social outcasts. While Peter represents the common house man. They are foiled pairs. These two men have never met before, yet Jerry manages to strike up a conversation. Peter, nervously, goes along with whatever Jerry is talking about. In the end, Jerry kills himself by leeping onto a knife that peter is holding in his hand. Jerry's objective was complete; to make the two very contrasting societies interconnect.

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