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The Best Care Possible: A Physician's Quest to Transform Care through the End of Life

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
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  • Posted May 27, 2012

    Good advice

    I found Dr. Byock the kind of doctor I want around when I become seriously ill. I've been with my family physician for over 20 years. He recently recommended I investigate hospice for a family member, my wife. As a part of the process I looked for books on the subject and found TBCP. Through his writing, I traveled the path of several serious patients - good material for someone who has not had family members pass away for a long time. Well explained thinking on many of the issues that come into play, not just case studies. This is a great resource, offering warm, serious writing and wisdom about a topic we all will face one day. Thank you Dr. Byock for writing this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 16, 2012

    A must read for the "sandwich" generation.

    I liked this book. Most of us will be facing end of life issues with our parents, other family members and ourselves. I think it is pretty safe to say that none of us are ever ready for it. Since I recently have been dealing with my own father and his declining health and near death, it was a very timely read for me. The medical care system in our country is exceptionally complex and expensive. This book does a good job of educating the reader on some of this as well as "gives permission" to choose palliative care, yet discusses how hard that is to come to terms with. I think it is well worth the read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2012

    A MUST

    A well-needed recommendation for health care culture-change in America. A humane approach to spending our final days as optimally possible without technological interference.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 30, 2012

    For anyone of any age thinking of the issue of quality vs. quant

    For anyone of any age thinking of the issue of quality vs. quantity in life, Dr. Byock's book is worth reading. I've often wondered whether Americans' greatest strength - the boundless optimism and can-do attitude - actually works as a liability when it comes to accepting the inevitable. Because accepting death is seen as conceding defeat, might people insist on spending fruitlessly in search of cure for the incurable, thus exacerbating our current healthcare crisis? Dr. Byock's book thoughtfully explains the alternative and how going with hospice and palliative care may help to give the patients and their families time to grieve and bond, the time which might otherwise be lost if they were to endure endless cycles of painful surgeries and chemotherapy. I recommend the book to everyone, whether one is healthy or ill, because we'll all have to make the decision sometime in our lives.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    A family member has pancreatic cancer, for which there is no cur

    A family member has pancreatic cancer, for which there is no cure. At this point it is a matter of quantity vs quality of life. This book has given me much insight and clarity about how to deal with the last season of their life.

    Definitely one of the best books I've read in awhile.

    Another book recommendation is "What Really Matters: 7 Lessons for Living from the Stories of the Dying" by Karen Wyatt, MD (2/21/2012)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    This is a book highly recommended for each family member who is helping a family member through the last stages of life.

    As I said above this book is highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    very highly recommended

    I have read many of Dr. Byock's books and this is by far the best.. I met Dr. Byock at Dartmouth Medical Center in Lebanon, NH while a family member was ill and his methods were/are extraordinary... The end of life should be a private and personal choice... Wonderful book and gives one things to think about....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2013

    Tell the world about this book .  Invaluable for those friends,

    Tell the world about this book .  Invaluable for those friends, acquaintances, family of those dying.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2012

    Hollyleaf 12

    Featherwhisker lashed his tail. "Don't come then! Stay here in the dark. My words will be wasted on you anyway." He bounded foreward, his living Clanmates scrambling after him. Pale light showed ahead and he pelted for the edge of the forest, breaking from the trees, tail high. The moors rose before him. Charging from the ferns, he led ThunderClan onto the grassy slopes. Cats were swarming from every direction, racing for the hills. He spotted Brambleberry's shining black and white pelt leading a horde of RiverClan warriors. Mothflight raced from the valley, warriors skimming over the grass behind her like a flock of starlings. Featherwhisker's paws ached from running but hope was swelling in his chest. At the crest of a hill, he stopped and turned, amazed by the ranks of warrior cats crowding over the slopes below him. Mothflight halted beside him. "Word must have spread." Brambleberry slowed, panting, and sat down. As Featherwhisker plucked at the grass, Yellowfang scrambled to the top of the hill and stopped beside him. Her eyes stretched wide as an owl's as she saw the cats amassed below. "Jayfeather came," Brambleberrt whispered in Featherwhisker's ear. The tom stood apart from the other cats, his eyes distrustful. "Clans!" Featherwhisker lifted his chin and stepped foreward. "Listen!" "Why?" Jayfeather growled. Bramblestar jerked around and hissed at him. "You can leave if you want to!" Jayfeather flattened his ears but didn't move. Featherwhisker tried again. "There is a terrible threat to you all! And to StarClan. You must know, the Dark Forest is rising! You must face the truth, and the truth is worse than you imagined. The Dark Forest must be met and fought. You will not win by huddling in your Clans like mice. You must stand together or fall divided!" He unsheathed his claws. "How can we beat this enemy?" Blackstar called. Snowbird's eyes glittered. "They have grown stronger." "You have heard what the Dark Forest is threatening your Clans with. Are you afraid to fight?" Yelliwfang lifted her voice to the gathered warriors. Blackstar bristled. "Never!" Featherwhisker saw determination hardening the gazes of the warriors. "But will you fight together?" He questioned. Bramblestar swished his tail. "We can't fight such cruelty while we're divided." Jayfeather stepped foreward. "How will we know who to trust?" "You can trust me. And StarClan." Featherwhisker motioned to the other medicine cats with his tail. "Have faith, the final battle is upon us." He closed his eyes. Featherwhisker opened his eyes. The Starpool rippled at his nose. Mothflight, Yellowfang, and Brambleberry were appearing, their pelts brushing the stone as they clambered to their paws. "Return to your Clans." Featherwhisker decided. He felt determination harden beneath their pelts. "We have a lot of preparing to do."

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2012

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    Posted April 30, 2012

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    Posted June 15, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2013

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