Customer Reviews for

The Book of Paul

Average Rating 3.5
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(18)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(8)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

If you are looking for a standard summer read, then I would not

If you are looking for a standard summer read, then I would not recommend The Book of Paul. But if you are looking for a most unusual read, one that not only won’t you be able to put down, but one that will stay with you long after you are finished, then I highl...
If you are looking for a standard summer read, then I would not recommend The Book of Paul. But if you are looking for a most unusual read, one that not only won’t you be able to put down, but one that will stay with you long after you are finished, then I highly recommend this debut novel from the very talented Richard Long. The Book of Paul is difficult to categorize: it is part mystery, part thriller, part erotica, and part horror…and 100% engrossing. A well-crafted psychological character study told in a cinematic style, The Book of Paul begins innocently (and humorously) enough with the line “He practiced smiling”, but quickly the reader realizes that there is more to this line than would first appear. This line is, in fact, revelatory. Richard Long has chosen his words carefully. Not one single word, and certainly no single character, in The Book of Paul can be taken at face value. Nothing is as it appears. And yet, every character and action is masterfully crafted as part of the puzzle that is The Book of Paul. Mr. Long has numerous talents as a writer: he is certainly one of the more creative storytellers of today, but for my money, his real talent lies in the fact that he commands a psychological savvy that few writers do. Richard Long’s characters are richly drawn, possessing a complexity of personality traits that mesh with their histories and with their actions. You will understand these characters, you will understand what motivates them, you will like them and you will hate them, but most importantly you will believe them.

posted by Stephen_M_Elliott on June 6, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Reviewed by Marissa Book provided by the author for review Revie

Reviewed by Marissa
Book provided by the author for review
Review originally posted at Romancing the Book

The Book of Paul is one of those books that you yearn to put down but just can’t seem to stop reading. I was immediately drawn in and confused, bored and intrigued...
Reviewed by Marissa
Book provided by the author for review
Review originally posted at Romancing the Book

The Book of Paul is one of those books that you yearn to put down but just can’t seem to stop reading. I was immediately drawn in and confused, bored and intrigued. But it was the characters that kept me picking the book up.

Paul, the father-figure antagonist of the story, is a self-described angel. He tells of “another world not at all like the world we live in” and how “the luminous beings in the other world were made of pure energy, so they could never die.” At first, I see Paul as a sort of savior, saving Martin from a horrific childhood filled with abuse and anguish; but as the story progresses, Paul’s true colors come out and he becomes more despotic monster than angel.

Martin, the son-figure, begins as an abused child who yearns for love and finds it in Paul, his mother’s new boyfriend. As a child, Martin is smart – he knows when to keep his mouth shut – but he is also needy, craving the love and affection he never received from his mother. When Paul offers him attention, Martin eats it up and does whatever Paul asks of him to keep it. It’s this little boy I first begin to like, feeling sympathy and heartache as his story begins, then intrigue as his relationship with Paul develops. As a man, I like how Martin tries to stay away from Paul but is drawn back, knowing fate has something in store for him but not quite sure what or how to play it.

Rose is a tattoo artist and body enhancement specialist. She loves pain, both inflicting and receiving. I wasn’t quite sure what to make of her at first but there was something about her that drew me. She is plucky. That’s not a word I would normally use but it seems to fit Rose. She deals in a world most of us would never have the stomachs to even think about for more than a few seconds – and she does it all happily. However, she is not the brave, stoic heroine we read in a lot of the romance novels. When confronted with probable death, she screams, pleads and cries. This makes her much more human than those other characters.

I have to admit I also learned a few things from this book, including different body enhancements I never would have thought of and the idea of technological singularity (the point when computers become more intelligent than humans). But some of these things also made for a difficult read, be it stomach-turning or just attempting to absorb the information. If you have time to sit with an intense, page-turning book, this is definitely for you.

posted by RtBBlog on October 6, 2013

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  • Posted October 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Marissa Book provided by the author for review Revie

    Reviewed by Marissa
    Book provided by the author for review
    Review originally posted at Romancing the Book

    The Book of Paul is one of those books that you yearn to put down but just can’t seem to stop reading. I was immediately drawn in and confused, bored and intrigued. But it was the characters that kept me picking the book up.

    Paul, the father-figure antagonist of the story, is a self-described angel. He tells of “another world not at all like the world we live in” and how “the luminous beings in the other world were made of pure energy, so they could never die.” At first, I see Paul as a sort of savior, saving Martin from a horrific childhood filled with abuse and anguish; but as the story progresses, Paul’s true colors come out and he becomes more despotic monster than angel.

    Martin, the son-figure, begins as an abused child who yearns for love and finds it in Paul, his mother’s new boyfriend. As a child, Martin is smart – he knows when to keep his mouth shut – but he is also needy, craving the love and affection he never received from his mother. When Paul offers him attention, Martin eats it up and does whatever Paul asks of him to keep it. It’s this little boy I first begin to like, feeling sympathy and heartache as his story begins, then intrigue as his relationship with Paul develops. As a man, I like how Martin tries to stay away from Paul but is drawn back, knowing fate has something in store for him but not quite sure what or how to play it.

    Rose is a tattoo artist and body enhancement specialist. She loves pain, both inflicting and receiving. I wasn’t quite sure what to make of her at first but there was something about her that drew me. She is plucky. That’s not a word I would normally use but it seems to fit Rose. She deals in a world most of us would never have the stomachs to even think about for more than a few seconds – and she does it all happily. However, she is not the brave, stoic heroine we read in a lot of the romance novels. When confronted with probable death, she screams, pleads and cries. This makes her much more human than those other characters.

    I have to admit I also learned a few things from this book, including different body enhancements I never would have thought of and the idea of technological singularity (the point when computers become more intelligent than humans). But some of these things also made for a difficult read, be it stomach-turning or just attempting to absorb the information. If you have time to sit with an intense, page-turning book, this is definitely for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2014

    Interesting plot but horrifically graphic

    This book has an interesting plot. It is drawn out purposefully to be suspenseful but at times to the point of boredom. It is horrifically graphic and violent.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 14, 2013

    very interesting read

    fast moving, complicated plots lines, interesting characters

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    A different kind of story.

    Long, and involved story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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