Customer Reviews for

The Choice

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Rutland, Georgia, 1974. One year after Roe v. Wade has become ¿

Rutland, Georgia, 1974. One year after Roe v. Wade has become ‘law’ of
the land. Back then, girls were hustled out of school and forced to
make other accommodations to have their babies before returning to
school. That year, Sandy Lincoln, a senior at Rutland High Sc...
Rutland, Georgia, 1974. One year after Roe v. Wade has become ‘law’ of
the land. Back then, girls were hustled out of school and forced to
make other accommodations to have their babies before returning to
school. That year, Sandy Lincoln, a senior at Rutland High School, gets
pregnant by her football hero boyfriend, Brad Donelly. He tries to
manipulate her into an abortion with the tantalizing offer of marriage
later on. Her parents are supportive in helping her make a better
choice. Sandy ends up living with her aunt Linda, her mother’s
sister, in Atlanta, Georgia, until her baby is born. However, on her
way to her aunt’s house, she stops at a gas station to purchase a drink,
when a mysterious old woman approaches her with a prophecy and a warning
about the babies she is carrying. This warning and prophecy plays an
integral part in her choice of where she places her babies for adoption
and why. Thirty years later, her choice will come full circle in ways
she never thought possible as she tries to help a pregnant teenager who
has been raped. Robert Whitlow, in The Choice, takes us down the
difficult road of being a pregnant teenager with monumental choices to
make about her pregnancy, trying to do what’s best for her babies, and a
heartbroken grandmother who wants to keep her grandchildren. We are
given an in-depth, personal view of Sandy’s choices, which are far from
simple. They involve courage, selflessness, a broken heart, and a
heartrending, yet beautiful gift of adoption to childless couples
seeking a child. The story depicts how teenage pregnancies affect not
only the pregnant teenager, but the babies, grandparents, father,
siblings, extended family, adoptive family, etc. Our sins don’t just
affect ourselves–they have a rippling effect that courses through many
lives. A boomerang episode transpires thirty years later, when Sandy is
a teacher at her old high school and a pregnant young Mexican teenager
who was raped comes to her for help. A school counselor throws you into
the world’s culture wars over women’s reproductive rights. The power
struggles that evolve are so relevant to today’s world, and emulate what
transpires in schools across the country regarding underage abortions,
only now more quietly and insidiously. The author gives a blow-by-blow
account of the intricacies of the battle of trying to choose life over
abortion for this young pregnant girl who is frightened by all the
circumstances. Lives are at stake. Will Sandy make the right choice?
Linda’s influence in the matters of truth, Sandy’s own faith, and the
faith of many others in the story help to show the ultimate decision
should rest in God’s design for our lives. Though we stumble and fall,
He is always there to help us make the right decisions if we but call
upon Him. The author wrote the book to honor mothers . He has an
intended irony in the selection of his book title, The Choice. It plays
on the word “choice,” showing that “choice” can also mean a woman’s
decision not to abort. Sandy is unselfishly “pro-choice”–’choosing’ to
allow the babies to be adopted. Kudos to the author to stress this
important aspect!!! This book was provided free by Amy Lathrop and
Christen Krumm of the Litfuse Publicity Group in exchange for my honest
review. No monetary compensation was exchanged.

posted by onedesertrose on August 21, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Te previous reviews were obviously planted

However, As a BirthMother I can honestly say this story starts out realistic to most cases of the decade but ends inlike most reununions, especially where boys/males are adoptees. Good read. Quirky rushed ending.

posted by 9222094 on September 8, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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