Customer Reviews for

The Coming of the Horseclans

Average Rating 4.5
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  • Posted June 28, 2013

    I first read about half a dozen of the Horseclans novels (by the

    I first read about half a dozen of the Horseclans novels (by the late Robert Adams during the 1970s and 1980s. The genre is military action/science fiction set in post-apocalyptic North America during the 27th century.. This is the first book in the series (there are over a dozen), but as the author states, while he initially moves forward in time from this volume, later he switches to several volumes set before the time of The Coming, which begins approximately 600 years after a world-wide nuclear war, various plagues, and cataclysmic seismic disturbances have thrust survivors into a brutal pre-industrial age.
    I recommend starting with The Coming, as it provides a good overview of the story arc. Milo of Morai, an immortal from the 20th century, has returned as prophesied to leads the nomadic Horseclans from the high plains of southern Canada and North America to the east coast. Their goal is to rebuild their original home, Ehlai (Los Angeles) by the sea, but since most of California has fallen into the Pacific, Milo has convinced them to migrate east instead of west. Waiting for the travelers in the east, from Canada to Georgia (earthquakes and tidal waves have also altered the east coast), are invaders from Europe and the Middle East— a mix of Greeks, Spaniards, Italians, Armenians, etc—called the Ehleenee. The language they speak is Greek, but as with Merikan (American) the author takes free literary license with spelling. You either have fun trying to figure out the origins of words, such as Pitzburk (Pittsburg), Djo Kahrtuh (Joe Carter), Djeri Hahfmun (Jerry Haufman), Karaleenos (Carolina), or you go crazy. I had fun with  it. 

    There is no detailed characterization. The prose is spare but descriptive. There are many vivid action scenes that include descriptions of hunting wild game and small to large combat events with plenty of gore. The author seems familiar with military protocol and a variety of weapons, so the sense of realism is there. On the negative side, the jumps back and forth in time result in disjointed stories and repetition.

    While I don’t read military fiction, I do like apocalyptic fiction and was drawn to the strong animal element in much of this series. The people of the Horseclans have the ability to communicate telepathically with and bond with their specially bred horses and with their allies, the huge Prairie Cats (the result of pre-war attempts to recreate the ancient sabertooth). You also run into giant ferrets and otters, shaggy crosses between buffalo and feral cattle, and other mutated denizens of the new world. For more on the ancestors of the Horseclans and their animal allies, follow The Coming with The Horses of the North, A Woman of the Horseclans, and Horseclans Odyssey. Some of the other titles focus primarily on battles between the Ehleenee and their American apponents

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2010

    Poorly spell checked

    I have read the original and this digital copy is riddled with spelling errors. It was distracting.

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    Posted April 18, 2013

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    Posted July 7, 2010

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    Posted December 3, 2010

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    Posted July 29, 2010

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    Posted July 16, 2011

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