Customer Reviews for

The Daylight War (Demon Cycle Series #3)

Average Rating 4.5
( 156 )
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(106)

4 Star

(29)

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(7)

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(2)

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(12)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

A 4-star fantasy with a 5-star cliffhanger . . . WOW!

Much as he did with the second instalment, Brett casts us back in time to open up the novel, introducing us to the back story of Inevera. It's a truly fascinating tale, perhaps more so than her husband's, which truly serves to flesh out her character and better definer ...
Much as he did with the second instalment, Brett casts us back in time to open up the novel, introducing us to the back story of Inevera. It's a truly fascinating tale, perhaps more so than her husband's, which truly serves to flesh out her character and better definer her edges. Rather than transform her from villain to hero, as the opening of The Desert Spear did for Jaridr, it lays the ground for a more sympathetic understanding of her motives, and establishes her as a much more cunning and dangerous foe. Most interesting of all, we get to see the 'truth' behind her die casting, the unvarnished facts as she reads them, not as she interprets them for others.

Renna proves that her heroics in the closing chapters of the second book were not just an anomaly, while also developing her relationship with Arlen in some rather intriguing ways. There's a desperate sort of happiness there that is entirely unexpected, humanizing Arlen even as he demonstrates just how close he's come to the Core. I wasn't sure about her role after the last book, and I still have a nagging fear that there's either a fall or a betrayal in her future, but Brett succeeds in making her a partner worthy of The Warded Man himself. More importantly, he doesn't allow questions of love and duty to blind Arlen to the truth, resulting in some surprising (but welcome) revelations late in the story.

Already a favourite of mine, Rojer really outdoes himself in this volume, earning himself a place at the forefront of the battle. He grows and matures as the mantle of responsibility settles a little more comfortably upon his shoulders; he makes an awkward, politically arranged, suspicion-laden marriage not only work, but become a high point of the story; and he even comes to terms with his past, as he's forced to publicly confront Arrick's misdeads . . . and lingering legacy. He's not the flashy, attention-demanding hero that Arlen is, but neither is he the meek, content to linger in the shadows, sidekick that he seemed set up to be in the first two volumes.

If there were to be a weak spot for me in the characterization, though, it would definitely be with Leesha. The drama, the romantic entanglements, and the teenager-like angst were just too much for me. The power and the strength that she showed in the first two volumes really seemed to be leached away here, as she began feeling sorry for herself and almost insisting that she be defined by the men in her life.

The story progression follows a weird arc once again, with some early developments, a lot of waiting, and a premature climax. Fortunately, there's a lot of story between developments, with the evolution of the Hollow, the new application of wards, and the rather stunning theft (and subsequent enhancement) of tactics by the demons more than enough to keep things compelling. It's an even darker tale than the first two volumes, with stakes both grim and dire, yet there's a sense of hope that's entirely refreshing. Once again, though, there's an oddly impatient transition to the true climax of the story, with an abbreviated major confrontation, and a cliffhanger ending that is as brilliant as it is excruciatingly painful.

Compelling, exciting, and thoroughly entertaining, The Daylight War is certain to please fans of the first two books. Even if it doesn't quite tell the story I expected, and denies us the fight we most desire until the very end, it's still a beautiful piece of storytelling.

posted by Beauty_in_Ruins on February 18, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

The first 2 books of the series introduced us to a young man who

The first 2 books of the series introduced us to a young man who had been hurt by the world but learned to become a strong solo hero
facing the evils of the world...  The protagonist demonstrated an admirable and strong solitude.  It was a page turner to see him develo...
The first 2 books of the series introduced us to a young man who had been hurt by the world but learned to become a strong solo hero
facing the evils of the world...  The protagonist demonstrated an admirable and strong solitude.  It was a page turner to see him develop
and grow in strength as he faced a dangerous and violent world on his own terms.  
This book takes away that person and introduces us in his place to a husband and wife team who spend page after page engaging
in asinine conversations, sharing sappy "I love you"s and parading around as supposed reluctant heroes in an ill tempered
and annoying fashion.  
Reader beware.  The Warded Man makes no appearance in this book.  A neutered character with a thin veneer of crude personality
and his annoying wife have taken his place. 

posted by 1123317 on February 13, 2013

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  • Posted July 3, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    THE DAYLIGHT WAR, the third book in Peter V. Brett¿s DEMON CYCLE

    THE DAYLIGHT WAR, the third book in Peter V. Brett’s DEMON CYCLE series, is all about delving just a little deeper into the characters. And while that comes at the cost of plot development, I’m mostly OK with that. Admittedly, this is a book with some pretty significant flaws, but the story has so much potential that I’m still eagerly looking forward to the next book in the series.




    The first book, THE WARDED MAN, was full of break-neck action, expertly introducing us to new characters and new worlds without slowing down the plot progression or interrupting the excitement. In THE DESERT SPEAR, the second book in the series, Brett seemed to go off the path a bit, providing us Jardir Ahmann’s back story and more details into a Krasian society we’d already been introduced to. Now, with THE DAYLIGHT WAR, we open with a detailed account of Inevera’s back story, and it feels like the story relies on flashbacks even more than THE DESERT SPEAR did.




    Fortunately, Brett’s characters remain his greatest strength. Inevera, Abban, Jardir, Count Thamos and Gared all had the opportunity to become one-dimensional villains at one point or another, but Brett does a great job of adding shades to their character. Jardir is basically a good guy, and was extremely likeable during his childhood flashbacks and throughout much of THE DAYLIGHT WAR, but he’s also hard and bent on conquest rather than cooperation. Inevera and Abban’s motives are sometimes selfish, and all the characters make mistakes, often deadly ones, but there’s something likeable in all of them.




    The only flaw for me was with Arlen and Renna, who too often strayed into becoming hillbilly superhero demon killers. Renna is probably the weakest character in the book, and Arlen was a stronger character before those two paired up. I don’t object to their relationship — it allows Brett some storytelling flexibility with Leesha Paper — but their interactions are the weakest in the book, especially contrasted with some of the other relationships that feel far more functional and better developed.




    This was far from a bad read thanks to the strengths of Brett’s writing ability and the depth of his characters. I would have liked to have seen more plot development from THE DAYLIGHT WAR, but I’m hoping that as the Demon Cycle progresses, Brett relies less on flashbacks and writes stories with the same forward momentum that made THE WARDED MAN such a great read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted March 5, 2013

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    Posted September 11, 2013

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