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The Design of Sites: Patterns, Principles, and Processes for Crafting a Customer-Centered Web Experience

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2003

    Extremely Helpful

    Although this book was slightly difficult to get the hang of reading...once I figured it out I found that this book is far superior to anything that I have read so far on this topic. It shows how to do and why and tags all related topics to each other. It is like the bible of good site design. Highly recommend that if you design sites you get this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2003

    A top tier book on developing customer-centered web usage.

    Have you ever wondered why you return time and time again to certain web sites yet there are others you wish not to return again? One of the measurements of site success is customer retention. In order to retain your customers, you must know and understand them. Not all web sites have the same customer requirements but they do share some of the same principles. Van Duyne, Landay, and Hong provide the guidance to explain the differentiation of site categories, what they have in common and what customers expect out of them. They reveal how the top benchmark sites are developed from the customer viewpoint. They explain how a customer should know where they are on a site and to navigate, even if they enter the site 5 layers down. The authors define eleven site genres and then discuss the various patterns that best fit specific type of site or general to multiple types of sites. There have been many books written on web usability and design ... but this book provides the reading experience that can be applied to any site. Have you ever wondered why you return time and time again to certain books yet there are others you wish not to return again? This book is a 'pager returner.' This book is highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2002

    Finally a design book that cares about usability

    I admit it; I'm a sucker for web design books. Whenever a book comes out on the subject, I tend to rush to buy it, hoping it can show me how to improve my craft, and make the designs I create better and more effective. Most of the time I'm disappointed because the book is simply a paean to whatever the latest and 'greatest' is in the world of hip and hot design. I don't want to know how to make what's hip and hot...I can figure that out for myself. What I want is to see how I can implement proven strategies that help users (my users) get things done as they use the product. And that¿s the true strength of this book; it¿s what it¿s all about. With almost 100 'patterns' of website design, this book breaks it down in simple, easy-to-get terms, that I, a technical usability specialist can understand and then turn around and reproduce. It's almost like a cookbook, in the sense that the book shows me: 1) What the patterns is, how it¿s used in the real world, and different flavors of it 2) Why the pattern is good, how it¿s been successful, and in some cases how it¿s been refined. 3) How the pattern works, what are it¿s components, and what does it need to be successful 4) And finally, what other patterns it¿s like, and how by incorporating parts of other patterns, I can strengthen my users¿ experience. I want this¿I don¿t have time to be reinventing the wheel every time my employer or a client wants a site. I need to be able to pick up a reference book and see exactly what a `community¿ site (or one of a hundred other types of sites) is like, so I have a good starting place to work from as I delve into what the project sponsor wants. This book helps me by already doing the leg-work of research into best practices, common features, and pitfalls. By giving me that already, I don¿t have to spend time doing figuring that stuff already out, and rather can spend time doing what¿s important¿listening to my client, employer, and user base to figure out how to meet their specific needs, and make them all happy. That¿s easily worth the price of admission.

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