Customer Reviews for

The Doors of Perception: Includes Heaven and Hell (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Average Rating 4.5
( 31 )
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  • Posted September 15, 2010

    Escape to Your Mind

    "There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception." (Aldous Huxley) The Doors of Perception was writing in the mid 50s by Aldous Huxley who is well known for the most popular work "A Brave New World". The Doors of Perception is actually a combination of two book one of which being "Heaven and Hell". Heaven and Hell is an eye opening book that explains the depth of our wanting or subconscious love for the astral world. It shows why we cause our selves to leave reality and how it effects the world around us. For centuries we have allowed ourselves in multiple ways to escape to our subconscious in view a world of beauty. From the John Lennon doing LSD to Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha) fasting, everyone within themselves has a love for the astral world. It is theorized that in the subconscious part of our mind, also known as antipodes, we see colors so vivid and in its purest form that the world itself seen through this part of the mind glows like gems from the real world. Think for a moment about how and why we love gems so much like rubies, sapphires, amethyst, and topaz. It may very well be that it reminds our antipodes of the astral world. Furthermore, people of different areas began to find out ways to trigger these so called "trips" to the other world. Some people like the Indians would fast for days alone in the woods until they saw a vision from there antipodes. Artwork itself began to evolve around humanities love to this cerebral world. Stained glass was even put into churches in the 12 century to induce such thoughts. It effects everything we do in one way or another. Is a love for the out of body experience such a bad thing or is it just natural? This book is a highly intelligent read which would be best suited for anyone interested in our love for drugs and out of body experiences. I would give in an 8 out of 10 since it was such an interesting read, but got hard to follow at parts.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Friday

    Read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2010

    Dude wut

    This book is totally mind-blowing and gives good insight not just into the use of mescaline but into life itself.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley: Written in 1954, Aldous Huxle

    Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley:
    Written in 1954, Aldous Huxley’s Heaven and Hell has remained what I deem to be a controversial novel for now over 60 years. Comparable to Huxley’s own mescaline experiences documented in The Doors of Perception, Heaven and Hell is an informative essay that tells the reader, from quite an unbiased perspective, everything they need to know to have a complete basic knowledge of alternate states of consciousness. Huxley’s narratives on alternate states of consciousness in this book include not only those that are identified with psychedelic drugs, but also those that go along with natural body processes, or even otherwise average objects, such as precious stones and jewels, and the place they stand regarding these transendental experiences. Unlike other literature on the subject, especially from this time period of the mid-20th century Huxley’s novel sheds a new light on a newly-revitalized concept in the post-WWII western world. Huxley introduces this concept in its barest form, explaining in an easily digested tone to even the most reluctant of readers, how commonplace the idea of changing consciousness actually is—from sleep to the ingestion of substances such as coffee and cigarettes. Making acute reference to the archaic quality of the human quest to change their mode of consciousness—whether it be from the ingestion of plant compounds such is the custom in pre-Colombian cultures worldwide—or exploration of other realms through the alteration of the state of the mind along with that of the physical body. As he explains these procedures, Huxley not only encompasses the essence of these esoteric processes from a varied perspective, he reverts back to these concepts the respect and ardent fervor that has been lost to them through the trials of modern society. Huxley leads the reader through a regression of thinking, introducing and reintroducing concepts and beliefs that reoccur through the course of intellectual evolution. In this manner Huxley insinuates to the reader in multiple instances where upon that road we veered off course, resulting in the biased, corrupt, and naïve subjectivity that draws the line between what is and what is not socially acceptable—not only in the 1950s, but today as well. As long as the principles in Huxley’s novel remain repressed and unevaluated as serious additions to the broad cultural definitions of altered states of consciousness, the book itself will remain a vital standard of academia for all those interested in furthering their knowledge not only of the possibilities and limits of the human mind, but those looking to find a glimpse into the human condition that leaves our society in its ceaseless succession of decreasing morals and unfluctuating cause and effect.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    "If the doors of perception were cleansed,everything would appear as it is / Infinite"

    Good book for anyone who is curious about the interminable potential of the brain/mind, and ways/methods of accessing the many minds eyes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Amazing

    Blew me away, such good perspective

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 21, 2010

    eye opener

    pro- aids self discovery-apprecition of art and nature rises-thought provoking- 2 books in 1!!!
    cons- a little different writing style from modern day(which i personally like)- at times diction is too high

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    Posted April 10, 2011

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