Customer Reviews for

The Edible Woman

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

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2 Star

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    Slightly Disappointing

    Awkward events start to occur in The Edible Woman after Marian McAplin and Peter, her boyfriend of less than a year, get engaged. Canadian author Margaret Atwood uses this matter to depict women's rebellion against the male-dominated society in the 1960's. When Marian becomes engaged she disassociates herself from her friends, plans to quit work after she gets married, and allows Peter to dictate their relationship.
    Marian becomes overwhelmed. She loses her voice and the ability to tell her own story. It is from here that Book Two begins, and the story switches from first person to third person. This switch is a reflection of Marian's relationship with Peter in which she, as a person, is disappearing. In my mind, the switching of narrators took away from the story. I found it confusing not knowing Marian's thoughts, as I got used to that during Book One.
    Marian is the reason I liked this book, because her voice rings so clear when she is narrating. Not only does she make the reader see the things she sees, she also makes the reader feel the things she feels. There's a lot more going on than the engagement issue, and Marian is sure to tell the reader about it.
    When Marian ignores the consuming nature of marriage she finds herself rejecting food. Food acts as a metaphor for her rejection of the male-dominated society. The Edible Woman is rich in metaphor and irony. There were some metaphors that I did not fully understand until I finished the entire novel and it would have been nice if they were evident earlier.
    As I read, I was torn about my true feelings towards the book. At times I found myself lacking interest due to some of the characters being one dimensional. The one character that kept me interested was Marian. I wanted to keep reading to see what twist her life would make next.
    It was challenging at times to stay connected, as Atwood pulled the reader in so much and tried to put you in Marian's place. Society today is much different and I found it hard to connect with Marian and her emotions at times.
    In general, I give a lot of credit to Atwood. This was her first major novel, and I am interested in reading some of her other pieces after finishing The Edible Woman. I really enjoyed the links between women, marriage, and society in an era defined by male executives that Atwood made.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2004

    prescient

    Series like Ally Mcbeal and Sex and the City owe this book an incredible debt. Its portrait of a woman coming apart at the seams because men want her to be something she isn't is the first of its kind. As a book, it's deep but narrow. The characters are little more than ideologies with legs and arms, but they are nonetheless quite interesting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2003

    This book? TERRIBLE!

    The premise of this book intrigued me; the book itself did not. The themes were poorly executed, the characters were one dimensional, and the prose was trite. I quit reading this book 2/3 of the way into it and just read the last chapter-the themes were reiterated and the characters lived happily ever after. Disappointing book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2003

    The Edible Woman

    It was the second book of her's that I've read. I loved every page,it wasn't a book that you can just read but one that you want to read. And of course you do.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2002

    triumph over evil

    recovering from anorexia, this book caught my eye and my morbid curiosity. i found i could relate alot to the heroine: being stifled in a buttoned up relationship, she slowly stops eating. it is a cry for help that not even she recognizes till the very end. oh, and the last few pages are the absolute best! atwood portrays a victorious and witty heroine, displaying the author's complete understanding of how surprising women can be! left me hungry for seconds.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2002

    More than meets the eye

    Margaret Atwood is a superbly intelligent writer. Her themes are woven deep within characters, situations, and the words on the page. The Edible Woman was a novel that took awhile to read, because it doesn't leave you riveted to its pages, but over time, and especially after finishing it, I was left with the meanings behind Atwood's words. Even though I finished this novel a while ago, I am left with overwhelming images of what Atwood lays out within her words. Underneath her characters droll lies so much more. Recommended highly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2009

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    Posted December 29, 2009

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    Posted January 10, 2010

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    Posted April 13, 2010

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    Posted August 11, 2009

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    Posted December 13, 2010

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