Customer Reviews for

The Flamethrowers

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

I am aware that critics are calling The Flamethrowers 'the great

I am aware that critics are calling The Flamethrowers 'the great American novel' and other such things. I agree that the author writes with striking verbiage, wonderful syntax, and amazing description of scenes and persons and places. She, somewhat like Mailer whose sty...
I am aware that critics are calling The Flamethrowers 'the great American novel' and other such things. I agree that the author writes with striking verbiage, wonderful syntax, and amazing description of scenes and persons and places. She, somewhat like Mailer whose style I love, makes you want to re-read paragraphs and pages to appreciate the writing along the way.  Her characters are complex, not too admirable, but interesting---often hard to like but always fascinating to watch. Many are full of themselves and the dialogue in certain occasions goes on too long like a long dinner party with too many egos we sometimes attend. The main character, Reno, is young and unfinished, still learning who she is as she encounters these many unique and much bigger characters. She is used and carried and hangs on to go with the flow, and along the way experiences places and things---and people---that will form her life and change her forever. Unfortunately, we don't know how Reno turns out; we can only imagine. I kept wanting her to get stronger and more her own person. I kept wanting more to happen in the plot, the story. While the descriptions were vivid and the conversations philosophical and thought-provoking, I wanted the story to go farther. I love how the book was written, but not so much where it went. 

posted by Atthebeach on June 7, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Fresh look at an often visited topic.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It covers the NYC revolutionary sub-culture in a thoughtful and often very humorous way. Sharp writing and story telling.

posted by Tcasscros on August 28, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 9 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2014

    Flamethrower

    Walks in

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 12, 2014

    Fun Read

    Traipsing through the 70's with these characters amused me. I liked the memory triggers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Mesmerizing

    It is the late ‘70s. Reno is a young drifter with pretensions to art. She lands in New York and hangs at the edges of a group whose composition changes with the inclinations of Sandro and Ronnie. Sandro, Ronnie, and Gianni, the men Reno spends her time with and learns from, are central but elusive figures in this drama. Sandro’s father, the man who teaches Sandro about how life really works, is also a central but elusive figure.

    Reno is, literally and figuratively, a printer’s reference, a human Caucasian face against which film color corrections could be matched to a referent. Subliminally viewed, if at all, her face might sometimes leave an afterimage. Only filmmakers and projectionists knew of her existence. “Their ordinariness was part of their appeal: real but unreachable women who left no sense of who they were. No clue but a Kodak color bar, which was no clue at all.”

    When we first see her, Reno is riding a fast motorcycle in the desert and later photographs her tracks. Sandro elevates her work by calling this a type of ‘land art.’ She wipes out, smashing the motorcycle, but her efforts lead to a larger success in setting a land speed record—more sport than art. She travels to Italy to promote the bike she rode in the Southwest desert.

    I have seen references to this as a “feminist” novel. It would not have occurred to me to say that, though there is some movement of a young, untried woman towards a greater understanding of her place in the world who then begins to take charge of her freedom. She also has a glimpse, towards the end of the story, of the men in her life not merely as simple stock images or disposable short outtakes of a larger film. “Cropping can make outcomes so ambiguous…” These are men with all the feelings and dreams, histories and futures of men and she is growing up.

    Reno as a character is particularly attractive in that she is able, in the course of this novel, to go off without a lover, rent an apartment on her own, and ride a motorcycle about New York City. This may be the dream of any young person anywhere: it is not feminism, but life. But what held me were the ideas about art, about looking, about believing, about making the effort.

    Reno’s friend Giddle believed herself to be a performance artist of sorts, but somewhere along the way she lost the thread, the point. Sandro made empty boxes. Ronnie photographed beat-up women. Reno made short films of street life. The art created by these folk, and the folk themselves when we first meet them, are stock images, referents for life. But by the end we have had growth and all are in the process of becoming.

    Sandro’s father has a critical role in this novel. The backdrop of his powerful and moneyed world of making tires for racing vehicles represents the old guard against which the artists and Italian Red Brigade demonstrators were rebelling. Yet he was a rebel in his time. The father taught Sandro important truths about the world: that there is evil and greed; that power matters; that guns don’t always fire as advertised; that Flamethrowers can be clumsy targets rather than objects of envy. Flamethrowers’ fire often ran back up the hose and consumed the perpetrator.

    Kushner held me spellbound with her descriptions of New York’s art scene in the ‘70s. Using Patti Smith’s National Book Award-winning Just Kids as a referent, we get a similar feeling of a young, edgy, trial-by-error art scene.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2013

    Zeus

    Age - 36 moons <br> Gender - &male <br> Looks - Black fur, purple eyes, right forepaw is silver <br> Personality - Meet me <br> Crush - None <br> Mate - None <br> Pups - Bane and Cole <br> Siggy - &#22250 ZEU$ &#22250 <br> Other - Just ask

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    Flamewind's Bio

    Name: Um...---Age: 10 moons---Gender: Male---Looks: Light ginger fur with ice blue eyes, thick fur, but it's not long---Clan: Skyclan---Rank: New Warrior---Apprentice: None---Powers: Night vision and can never get cold---Skills: Hunting, running, and planning---Weaknesses: Is terrified of water and hieghts---Mate: None---Crush: None---Kits: None---Mother: Loudscreech (Deceased)---Father: Unknown---Siblings: None---History: Ask and I'll claw your ears off. But I will tell you this. My old clan was destroyed and I only escaped by trickery and fleetness. That's all you need to know---Personality: Meet me and find out---Theme Song: Strangers Like Me from Tarzan

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1