Customer Reviews for

The Founders' Key: The Divine and Natural Connection Between the Declaration and the Constitution and What We Risk by Losing It

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Great Book

The words of the Declaration of Independence have a way of continuing to ring across the ages. The arrangements of the Constitution have a way of organizing our actions so as to produce certain results, and it has done this more reliably than any governing instrument in...
The words of the Declaration of Independence have a way of continuing to ring across the ages. The arrangements of the Constitution have a way of organizing our actions so as to produce certain results, and it has done this more reliably than any governing instrument in the history of man. The connection between the Constitution and the Declaration is both inspiring and commanding. The Declaration acquires a practical form and operation that do not seem to come from it alone. The Constitution soars to the elevation of the natural law, and its arrangements are reinforced with that strength. Dr. Arnn discusses why the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution do not contradict each other as progressives, academics and journalists claim. The author reminds us that we the people were intended to control the government as well as the government control certain human behaviors. At present we have no real control over the fourth branch, the Administrative system. This branch makes laws (regulations), supplanting the role of Congress. This branch administers penalties (fines) the function of the judicial branch. This is a very readable book, one that everyone interested in the issues of government should read. Dr. Arnn does an excellent job of presenting material from source documents: the Declaration, Constitution, and Federalist Papers. He also includes his source documents in the book. You don't have to take his word for what is being said. You can read it for yourself. I highly recommend this book. Whether you agree with his premises or not, you will at least have an understanding of what the source documents say and not be led astray by spurious reasoning. Knowing what is contained in the material will set you free to form your own opinions. I received a free copy of thee- book from Thomas Nelson as part of their Booksneeze Blogger program.

posted by VillaSyl on March 2, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A Great Read for History Buffs Who Love Politics

The Founder’s Key by Larry P. Arnn is a book that is great for history buffs; but not just any history buffs, but those who love the history of politics and for those who like our founding fathers. The book is very well researched. It is a book that set up in two parts...
The Founder’s Key by Larry P. Arnn is a book that is great for history buffs; but not just any history buffs, but those who love the history of politics and for those who like our founding fathers. The book is very well researched. It is a book that set up in two parts. Part #1 is The Argument and Part # 2 is on Foundational Readings. I liked that the book has readings from the Declaration of Independence and Constitution. I will say this I still love the fact that the founding fathers wanted us to have happiness and safety. The author also presented us quotes from James Madison through his essays for the Federalist. I am a history buff and I like broadening my thoughts and knowledge by reading things that are out of my historical genera of interests. This one was hard for me but I truly think it is just me. I think Larry Arnn has written this beautifully. My husband picked up the book and started it as well he found it fascinating. I only bring this up because I found the book dry but he did not. The book gives you the foundations of both the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. I did like that the people and our founding fathers who wrote these important documents stood up against the king and stood so firm to their convictions that I am free because of their wants and desires. I think this book would be a good read for high school or college classes .l think this because the author researched it so well. I am giving this book three out of five stars. Now comes the time in my blog where I tell you that I receive this complementary book from BookSneeze the review I have written are my own opinions.

posted by themiraclesnook on February 16, 2012

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  • Posted February 16, 2012

    A Great Read for History Buffs Who Love Politics

    The Founder’s Key by Larry P. Arnn is a book that is great for history buffs; but not just any history buffs, but those who love the history of politics and for those who like our founding fathers. The book is very well researched. It is a book that set up in two parts. Part #1 is The Argument and Part # 2 is on Foundational Readings. I liked that the book has readings from the Declaration of Independence and Constitution. I will say this I still love the fact that the founding fathers wanted us to have happiness and safety. The author also presented us quotes from James Madison through his essays for the Federalist. I am a history buff and I like broadening my thoughts and knowledge by reading things that are out of my historical genera of interests. This one was hard for me but I truly think it is just me. I think Larry Arnn has written this beautifully. My husband picked up the book and started it as well he found it fascinating. I only bring this up because I found the book dry but he did not. The book gives you the foundations of both the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. I did like that the people and our founding fathers who wrote these important documents stood up against the king and stood so firm to their convictions that I am free because of their wants and desires. I think this book would be a good read for high school or college classes .l think this because the author researched it so well. I am giving this book three out of five stars. Now comes the time in my blog where I tell you that I receive this complementary book from BookSneeze the review I have written are my own opinions.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 3, 2012

    The Founders' Key is largely a historical discussion of the link

    The Founders' Key is largely a historical discussion of the link between the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. It brings to light the intentions of the Founding Fathers as evidenced by outside sources such as the Federalist Papers. The author also does a fairly good job of discussing the pros and cons of representative government.

    The summary on the back of the book makes it seem as though this book will be about how leaders since the early part of the twentieth century have ignored the Constitution to the detriment of the country. However, the majority of the book isn't much more than a discourse on the intentions behind the two documents. Anyone who already has a keen understanding of American history won't be surprised by much of the book. Occasionally, the author makes mention of instances in our history when the Constitution hasn't been espoused, but not on the large scale that I was led to believe would be in this book.

    I found that the book became most interesting during the conclusion, when the author does more than make mere mention of specific American institutions that are not listed in the Constitution - such as the federalized education and welfare systems. In the conclusion, the reader gets a taste of what the author was trying to convey. Unfortunately, there isn't enough there to sate the appetite.

    I do hope that the author publishes a second book that further develops the study of the treatment of the Constitution by our nation's leaders - perhaps going farther back than Wilson, since Lincoln was also a master of laying the Constitution aside when he felt it served the needs of his times. And for that matter, Jefferson himself stated that future generations should not feel bound by the needs of his generation. I would love to read a discourse on this topic. I believe the author is up to this challenge. I just don't believe it happens in this book.

    Ultimately, the book would be a good read for anyone who is trying to gain a deeper understanding of the two documents that form the basis of our nation.

    Disclaimer: I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2012

    Upon reading “The Founders’ Key” by Larry P. A

    Upon reading “The Founders’ Key” by Larry P. Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, I am even more convinced America is at a cross roads. We are a nation divided, with one side endeavoring to preserve our constitutional heritage and the other seeking to change it.

    I recommend this book for anyone weak on American history and our founding government. It is a great start to learning about our Nation: where we’ve been, where we are and where we are headed!
    This book was provided complimentary by the publisher, Thomas Nelson, through BookSneeze for the purpose of honest review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This was a difficult one. While I enjoyed this book due to the n

    This was a difficult one. While I enjoyed this book due to the nature and thought behind it – the book was difficult for me to read. After a long day at work I try to unwind and relax when reading but this book required thought and definitely wound me up.

    Do I think it’s worth reading? Absolutely. I’ve even purchased copies for friends & the kids teachers.
    Do I think it’s a fun book? Absolutely not — it’s not meant to be — but it will teach you a ton and give you direction.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 16, 2012

    This is a long title for what turned out to be a rather short bo

    This is a long title for what turned out to be a rather short book. Halfway through this otherwise excellent treatise on the contemporary value of these founding documents we find none other than the full text of the documents themselves. This was a major disappointment as I found the author's positions and arguments compelling and worth reading. His credentials at first rendered the book too academic sounding. But the stories provided a more genuine argument. I wanted the book to go on. But suddenly it was over. It felt incomplete and quite frankly I felt robbed. If I wanted to read the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Federalist papers, I can do so for free on-line. I'm not sure whether this was the author's idea or the publisher's. Either way, it reduced my otherwise high ranking of this book as a result. Had the author or publisher provided a reference section of the author's other supporting work, I would have gone there just to get the rest of the story. I'm sure Mr. Arnn has much more to say. As it is, the Suggested Further Reading section provides many other authors, but not Mr. Arnn. I am also curious how Thomas Nelson gained the copyright to our founding documents, as the copyright page clearly states, "No portion of this book may be reproduced...except for brief quotations...without the prior written permission of the publisher."

    I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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