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The Gate Thief

Average Rating 4
( 44 )
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5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

The critics have done a poor job of actually reading the book.  

The critics have done a poor job of actually reading the book.  Kirkus Reviews fails to understand even the first chapter when they state that Danny is "plummeting up and down on his own steam."  Ahem, Kirkus: that is a reference to some events in Book 1, in w...
The critics have done a poor job of actually reading the book.  Kirkus Reviews fails to understand even the first chapter when they state that Danny is "plummeting up and down on his own steam."  Ahem, Kirkus: that is a reference to some events in Book 1, in which Danny accidentally makes a gate that shoots his teenage classmates up and down that he is helpless to stop.  It was a major part of the plot?  Remember?  Way to prove you have actually read the books. 
Meanwhile, Publisher's Weekly mocks those of us who managed to have a little self-control as teenagers and fails to notice that Danny's self-control is not really very good at all.  I mean, my measure of hormonal self-control involves not standing there thinking, "Hmm, maybe I should move out of this person's reach," but rather actually moving and then telling the person not to do it anymore, rather than tacitly encouraging more of the same while progressively getting closer and closer to the point of no return, until it gets crossed.  They must have skipped that part. 
And then Publisher's Weekly fails to notice the actually really bad consequences of Danny's heroic act, even though Wad spells a couple of them out in plain English.
The positive reviews are bland, more bland, and blah.  And that is why I felt compelled to write a review.  

In this book, we see the next step in Orson Scott Card's multi-series meanderings through the meaning of human relationships: the introspective relationship of the self to the self.  The explorations of this topic give us a far more "head-internal" narrative than we have seen in any of Card's recent books, which dwelled more strongly on interpersonal relationships.  
What I found most compelling was how the narrators cannot be trusted to actually reveal the hidden, subconscious thoughts of the characters.  We instead experience what the characters themselves experience, including all the lies they tell themselves.  This is the first book I have read in which narrator self-deception took center stage.  In case you don't understand what I'm talking about, I'll give an example.  
Danny, as another customer mentioned, repeats a refrain of only wanting to attend high school and be a normal kid.  However, if you look at his actions, it's clear that he doesn't want that at all.  If he did, he would not be acting in direct opposition to that desire at every opportunity.  In fact, judging from his actions, what he really wants is an audience to applaud him, or maybe even worshippers to worship him. 
Pranks are no fun if you laugh by yourself, yes, but he delights in it whenever a mere mortal feels gratitude to him, and he flexes his muscles whenever he can, just because he can.  These are not the actions of someone who wants to be normal and blend in.  But some part of him understands this about himself, and he does start to consciously become aware of it eventually, which drives him to seek out ways to prove to himself that he is a good person.  
His self-deception starts to fall apart, and he starts to question his own motives and actions.  More than that, as part of the theme of self-self relationships, Card is demonstrating that people have multiple internal realities that do not necessarily consciously know each other.  This part of the discussion of self-to-self is most blatantly covered by the revealing of the nature of Mithermage souls and gatefather/manmage powers, which are both gained from fragmenting pieces of the self.

posted by 4652737 on April 3, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

I've read most of Mr. Card's books. Everything from Treason on.

I've read most of Mr. Card's books. Everything from Treason on. I skipped the bible wives stuff and the Red Prophet stuff. But other than that I've read almost everything by him. I was looking forward to this book for a while. And I'm sorely disappointed. It's pre...
I've read most of Mr. Card's books. Everything from Treason on. I skipped the bible wives stuff and the Red Prophet stuff. But other than that I've read almost everything by him. I was looking forward to this book for a while. And I'm sorely disappointed. It's predictable, it's puerile, the story is uninteresting, and he spends a lot of time making Danny almost saint-like in his non-violence and non-reaction to betrayal, injustice, and antagonism from his family. I'm at a loss to adequately explain just how bad this book is. I don't leave much feedback (if any) and I certainly wouldn't have thought I'd be leaving negative feedback on one of my favorite authors of over 20 years. But this book... it's garbage. It has poor dialogue. Poor plot management. Inconsistencies that jarred me out of my willing suspension of disbelief. And it effectively made me dislike the protagonist's active lack of participation in his own life not to mention the unrealistic focus on him "just wanting to attend highschool". Ugh. Card can do better. He has. This was drivel and I want my money back.

posted by Finmalligan on March 26, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2013

    The critics have done a poor job of actually reading the book.  

    The critics have done a poor job of actually reading the book.  Kirkus Reviews fails to understand even the first chapter when they state that Danny is "plummeting up and down on his own steam."  Ahem, Kirkus: that is a reference to some events in Book 1, in which Danny accidentally makes a gate that shoots his teenage classmates up and down that he is helpless to stop.  It was a major part of the plot?  Remember?  Way to prove you have actually read the books. 
    Meanwhile, Publisher's Weekly mocks those of us who managed to have a little self-control as teenagers and fails to notice that Danny's self-control is not really very good at all.  I mean, my measure of hormonal self-control involves not standing there thinking, "Hmm, maybe I should move out of this person's reach," but rather actually moving and then telling the person not to do it anymore, rather than tacitly encouraging more of the same while progressively getting closer and closer to the point of no return, until it gets crossed.  They must have skipped that part. 
    And then Publisher's Weekly fails to notice the actually really bad consequences of Danny's heroic act, even though Wad spells a couple of them out in plain English.
    The positive reviews are bland, more bland, and blah.  And that is why I felt compelled to write a review.  

    In this book, we see the next step in Orson Scott Card's multi-series meanderings through the meaning of human relationships: the introspective relationship of the self to the self.  The explorations of this topic give us a far more "head-internal" narrative than we have seen in any of Card's recent books, which dwelled more strongly on interpersonal relationships.  
    What I found most compelling was how the narrators cannot be trusted to actually reveal the hidden, subconscious thoughts of the characters.  We instead experience what the characters themselves experience, including all the lies they tell themselves.  This is the first book I have read in which narrator self-deception took center stage.  In case you don't understand what I'm talking about, I'll give an example.  
    Danny, as another customer mentioned, repeats a refrain of only wanting to attend high school and be a normal kid.  However, if you look at his actions, it's clear that he doesn't want that at all.  If he did, he would not be acting in direct opposition to that desire at every opportunity.  In fact, judging from his actions, what he really wants is an audience to applaud him, or maybe even worshippers to worship him. 
    Pranks are no fun if you laugh by yourself, yes, but he delights in it whenever a mere mortal feels gratitude to him, and he flexes his muscles whenever he can, just because he can.  These are not the actions of someone who wants to be normal and blend in.  But some part of him understands this about himself, and he does start to consciously become aware of it eventually, which drives him to seek out ways to prove to himself that he is a good person.  
    His self-deception starts to fall apart, and he starts to question his own motives and actions.  More than that, as part of the theme of self-self relationships, Card is demonstrating that people have multiple internal realities that do not necessarily consciously know each other.  This part of the discussion of self-to-self is most blatantly covered by the revealing of the nature of Mithermage souls and gatefather/manmage powers, which are both gained from fragmenting pieces of the self.

    12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2013

    WORTH THE WAIT!!!

    I do LOVE Orson Scott Card. I have been patiently waiting for this book and was definitely not disappointed. This book takes off right where the first book left off, so it is pretty important that you read the fist one before this (The Lost Gate).

    This is a great fantasy series. I would not suggest for very young readers, as it does deal with some issues of sex (Danny's new God-like status has seemed to accentuate his attractiveness to the opposite sex). So, I would suggest this for high school age kids and up.

    I have been reading Mr. Card's books for years. This is a great new series from him. I hated waiting for so long for this addition to the series, but after reading the note from Mr. Card about wanting (no, needing) perfection for this series, I do understand. Thank you Mr. Card for that. I hope we won't have to wait so long for the next installment.

    -- SPeeD

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2014

    Nice use of some borrowed lore but otherwise, a kid's fantasy

    The storyline, by necessity I suppose, had the protagonist unbelievably (and knowingly) stumble towards actively risking world destruction. The stupidity made me want to abandon reading it, if that were in my nature.

    The weaving of biblical and even more ancient lore into a believable logic of "Ka" and "Ba" redeemed the poor storyline.

    An (actual) good writer could make this into another cult-hit and blockbuster movie, but as it stands, it's very so-so work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2014

    Awfullll!

    Orson scott card's other books were much better. The way he has danny's friends act is absurd and innapropriate. The ending to this book does not make me enthusiastic for the next book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2013

    The ending was lame

    Lame ending

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    Totally Unsatisfying

    Have you ever read a book from which someone had ripped out the last chapter? Well then you will know how I feel after I 'finished' the Gate Thief. There is nothing wrong with ending a book on a cliff-hanger; but the author at least needs to wrap up a few loose-ends to make you feel it was worth buying the book. My advice is skip this one and wait until the 3rd book in the series is published before you spend your hard earned money.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    I do not understand

    I have read almost every book of his. All have been very well thought out, and well written, yet this one was messy, and seemed very choppy in the storyline. I found myself bored in thd middle of the book. It seemed like Card really tried to peice it together in the end, but it still did not really leave a good taste inmy mouth. He introduced, and developed his characters very well, but the complete product in the plotline fell shot. I expect more from him. The third book better be amazing. I appreciate him trying to rewrite the book, and no doubt made it better then it would have been, but I feel it still ruined the QUALITY of this books final product. I also feel like he drifted from time to time. Inconsistencies were found multiple times. Oh well, this series has great petential, lets see how Card finishes it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2013

    This is the second book in a trilogy and as such it does quite a

    This is the second book in a trilogy and as such it does quite a bit of character building, and fact finding by the characters. However that said it was engrossing from beginning to end. Cannot wait fir the third book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 26, 2013

    I've read most of Mr. Card's books. Everything from Treason on.

    I've read most of Mr. Card's books. Everything from Treason on. I skipped the bible wives stuff and the Red Prophet stuff. But other than that I've read almost everything by him. I was looking forward to this book for a while. And I'm sorely disappointed. It's predictable, it's puerile, the story is uninteresting, and he spends a lot of time making Danny almost saint-like in his non-violence and non-reaction to betrayal, injustice, and antagonism from his family. I'm at a loss to adequately explain just how bad this book is. I don't leave much feedback (if any) and I certainly wouldn't have thought I'd be leaving negative feedback on one of my favorite authors of over 20 years. But this book... it's garbage. It has poor dialogue. Poor plot management. Inconsistencies that jarred me out of my willing suspension of disbelief. And it effectively made me dislike the protagonist's active lack of participation in his own life not to mention the unrealistic focus on him "just wanting to attend highschool". Ugh. Card can do better. He has. This was drivel and I want my money back.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Fantastic

    I love Orson Scott Card! The first book in the series was fantastic and I've been eagerly awaiting this one. It's totally worth the wait.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 21, 2014

    The second book in the Mither Mages series continues the story o

    The second book in the Mither Mages series continues the story of our young gate mage, Danny North. Aside from one small inconsistency with his name (Hal calls him "Danny North" before discovering his God-like past instead of his mortal persona "Danny Stone" that was given in the first novel), this was an exceptional book. Most people won't even notice the discrepancy. If you are a fan of urban fantasy, God-like characters, and the potential for supernatural world-wide disaster wrapped in a coming-of-age story line, this is certainly the story for you. Card continues to excel in his craft.  Highly recommended!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2014

    What

    Your carzy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Can't wait until the next book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2013

    Although I enjoyed this book, I did have my issues with it. Firs

    Although I enjoyed this book, I did have my issues with it. First and foremost was that Card doesn't seem to understand young women, or women of any kind at all. It is evident in how he has Danny's female high school friends act. They practically beg Danny to put a baby in them because they want a "god's baby." And when Danny is "going to war" he implies that women want a baby in them when their man is going to war, it just their nature. It's ridiculous. As a young female I'm appalled. I don't know anyone in there right mind who would feel that way. Just because someone is in a position of power does not mean that women are throwing themselves at them. I'm offended by the way he develops his female characters, it's like they aren't really humans in the same sense that men are. He really seems to put them below others whether by making them weak willed and begging for male attention or by making them manipulative, conniving, and power hungry. Other then that he doesn't put much character development into them. It's almost as though he doesn't think there are any truly "strong" women.

    Otherwise a lot of the issues I had with the book have already been mentioned. He didn't tie up the book very well and I don't think everything was well thought out. However, I understand that it must be extremely hard to write a book and keep everything in check and make sure you have thought of everything. I just wished that he actually respected women.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2013

    Great Direction!

    I really liked the blend of SciFi elements in a mainly fantasy nonvel

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Decent sequel

    Not as good as the first book but still pretty good.

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  • Posted May 10, 2013

    JUVENILE WRITING

    Slightly better than 'The Lost Gate', but that is not the quality of writing I expected from Mr. Card.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    Darkness

    Leaning against a tall oak tree, she let her hand rest against the hilt of her knife. Her eyes went wide at every sound, her heart baically stopping, and a gasp escaping her mouth each and every time. Not too long after Vlad had left, a figure stepped into the slight clearing. But it wasn't him.

    0 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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