Customer Reviews for

The Girl in the Red Coat

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2008

    Alone

    The novel ¿Roma Ligocka, The Girl in the Red Coat¿ is a memoir about Roma Ligocka¿s life and how she grows up during Hitler¿s reign over the Jew¿s in the late 40¿s. Roma experiences things such as deaths, a person being drug off to concentration camps and hiding out during her childhood. Roma never got to experience a normal childhood. Her life was a constant hid out. She explains to us readers how she fought for survival every second of her life and how her life unfolds from these previous events. In the beginning of the Memoir, She explains the living conditions in the ghetto, which is where she was being raised for a short time. A symbol introduced in the first chapter of the novel is blond hair. When Roma was born her mother Tosia was disappointed she didn¿t have blond hair like the Germans. They thought it would provide them safety if Roma didn¿t look like a Jew. Tosia wants her to be blond so bad that they resort to dying her hair as a young child. Throughout the novel, Roma constantly is moving around and hiding. They were afraid of the Germans because if you were Jewish, out past six o¿clock, and had no identity cards they would shoot you. The author tells us readers in depth about they living situations and how they felt physically. They eventually find a home that takes them in frequently. One of the people whom reside there is Manuela. Roma looks up to her because she is an actress and would like to be one when she is older. The writer also uses a technique of using flashbacks. She writes about Tosia telling Roma how life used to be and how she met her husband. This technique keeps me interested because it compares their past and present and it makes me want to keep reading. It makes me think of how your life can change really fast and that you should cherish every moment. The author also writes the novel in a timeline form. It starts as Roma being a child but we as a reader see her grow into what she is today. We witness her first days at school, her first crushes, and her growing into a woman. Also, Roma and her mom change their attitudes of one another throughout the novel. Tosia disapproves of a lot of the choices her daughter makes. They drift apart from one another. It is sad because the whole war situation and Hitler¿s reign has caused Roma to constantly be depressed. It caused her to become distant from people. All of her new friends don¿t satisfy her. Roma doesn't seem to fit in with any particular group so she turns to pill popping. She finds herself falling deep into the drug sub-culture and is having a hard time finding her way out. She feels she needs these drugs to feel normal.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2005

    Through the Eyes of the Innocent

    A compelling portrayal of life in Nazi occupied Poland as seen through the eyes of an innocent child whose life was forever changed by the harrowing conditions she, her family and those that ultimately helped them survive were put through. Share the journey of Roma's life and never 'sweat' the little things ever again!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2004

    Wonderful

    A wonderful memoir told from a unique child's perspective through to her adult life. This would make a wonderful and informative movie of the holacaust.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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