Customer Reviews for

The Good Luck of Right Now

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Five is just not enough stars. This book made me decide that I

Five is just not enough stars. This book made me decide that I will read everything this author writes. I loved it. It is written in the form of letters to Richard Gere and I didn't really know what to make of it at first. The best way I can explain it is that the b...
Five is just not enough stars. This book made me decide that I will read everything this author writes. I loved it. It is written in the form of letters to Richard Gere and I didn't really know what to make of it at first. The best way I can explain it is that the book asks why some people live glossy, beautiful lives and some people live lives where horror is an every day or at least frequent visitor. Through the letters, Bartholomew is reaching from his end of the spectrum to the other side. Are the kindnesses and grand gestures of celebrities any different than the kindnesses and grand gestures of the uncelebrated? This book shows that yes, of course they are. Matthew Quick has a special sensitivity for the mentally ill and the misfits of the world. He had it in Silver Linings Playbook and he has it here too. I love that. I work in a library so I appreciated the library references and he has a great sense of humor. Loved the "default platitude" of the grief counselor as Bartholomew described it. It's a small thing but you'll have to read it to find it. Awesome book. I have to thank Goodreads for the early copy of this one.

posted by L875 on February 16, 2014

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings As this was

Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings




As this was my first Matthew Quick book, I wasn't sure about his style, but knew of him through his previous book being made into quite the hit movie.  This book was told from Bartholomew's perspective through letters ...
Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings




As this was my first Matthew Quick book, I wasn't sure about his style, but knew of him through his previous book being made into quite the hit movie.  This book was told from Bartholomew's perspective through letters to Richard Gere - interesting, but it fit the character completely.  I am not one to enjoy profanity, so I had a hard time reading the parts that included the character Max, but there again, I thought it fit the character so I agree with the author putting it in.  

posted by KrittersRamblings on March 22, 2014

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  • Posted February 19, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Matthew Quick's last novel The Silver Linings Playbook was turne

    Matthew Quick's last novel The Silver Linings Playbook was turned into an award winning movie.

    His newest book The Good Luck of Right Now gives us another wounded protagonist to root for.

    Bartholomew Neil is nearing forty when his mother dies from cancer. Having never held a job, lived on his own and with no friends, he is unsure of what to do next. He starts to puzzle things out in letters written to actor Richard Gere. (Mom's favourite) These missives are heartbreaking in their honesty.

    " I get sidetracked easily by interesting things, and for this reason, people often find it hard to converse with me, which is why I don't talk very much to strangers and much prefer writing letters, in which there is room to record everything, unlike real-life conversations where you have to fight and fight to fit in your words and almost always lose."

    Bartholomew and his mother were faithful church goers and he does find some solace from parish priest Father McNamee. But he's not too sure about his grief counsellor Wendy, although they do set a life goal for Bartholomew - to have a drink with a friend in a bar. What Bartholomew would really like to do is meet the Girlbrarian at the library he frequents every day.

    Bartholomew is a great believer of Synchronicity by Carl Jung. Some might call it coincidence or destiny. Bartholomew's mother had her own twist on it - "For every bad thing that happens, a good thing happens too - and this was how the world stayed in harmony." Whatever way you choose to look at it - Bartholomew's life seems to be full of coincidences that may help him find his place in the world.

    Quick has written another great book full of decidedly quirky characters and odd situations. I'm not sure why, but I am drawn to characters that are outside of the mainstream view of life. Their struggle to fit in and find a place for themselves. Most of all, it is their optimism, their steady one foot in front of the other, their acceptance of everyone that appeals to me. Bartholomew embodies all that.

    As he says..."Well, if there weren't weird, strange and unusual people who did weird things or nothing at all, there couldn't be normal people who do normal useful things, right?"

    The Good Luck of right now is an unusual narrative told from a decidedly different character - one that you shouldn't spend too much time analyzing or trying to fit into a mold. The situations and connections are just as different - but who's to say they couldn't happen? Just go with it - and see where Bartholomew ends up. I quite enjoyed The Good Luck of Right Now - maybe it was meant to land in my mailbox?!

    (PS There's one scene in the library involving a patron viewing questionable material - I was laughing out loud. As a employee of a public library, I can tell that Quick did not exaggerate this scene!)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2014

    I relate to bart i was told i have early onset of dementia? It scared me to be losing memery . Strange how my wife daughter,son get up set when memory fails or just slips away or i feel my mom or brother are alive like so many others who havr past. W

    Ive written my thoughtsbin headline hope thy can still be read.

    1 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 20, 2014

    I should have written Richard Gere more letters. Heck, I should

    I should have written Richard Gere more letters. Heck, I should have written him one letter. One long diatribe where I offered up all of my feelings and emotions, thoughts on the Chinese government and Tibet, and all the women who have entered my life and then exited en masse, telling my story in a series of letters over a period of months or maybe it was years (I forgot), but if my source of inspiration for writing said letters is rifling through my mom’s underwear drawer, I’m glad I completely missed that memo.

    If you like quirky characters that have a penchant for four-letter words, a woman who may be emotionally available through the aid of multiple therapy sessions, and a man who at thirty-eight years of age has no idea how to live without his mother, then sister have I got the story for you. You may want to sit down for this one, and read it while under the influence of prescription medication, otherwise you might smile at inopportune moments, like your neighbor’s funeral, or the sendoff of your favorite goldfish.

    If Matthew Quick in any way resembles his characters, then he has more than a few quirks, and from my previous experience with playing in my own sandbox, there’s nothing wrong with a few idiosyncrasies. In fact, life hands you a Benjamin Franklin every time you come up with wonderfully original ones. If you don’t believe me, just ask Bartholomew Neil, or maybe you’re better off speaking with Matthew Quick. Either way, just make sure you wash your hands first.

    THE GOOD LUCK OF RIGHT NOW had me galloping toward the finish with my hands up in the air. Without too much effort, I can safely say my enjoyment reached both hands, and then my brain, as I waited with bated breath for what I might discover within the confines of the next letter. If I were to dangle out on a limb in the middle of a windstorm, I might even call it inspiring. But that’s the kind of deduction you should make on your own, while not under the influence of prescription medication.

    Robert Downs
    Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator

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  • Posted July 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick is a novel fol­low­i

    The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick is a novel fol­low­ing the path of a men­tally dis­abled man deal­ing with griev­ing for his mother. Mr. Quick is a pro­lific nov­el­ist, his most famous novel, The Sil­ver Lin­ing Play­book, was turned into an award win­ning film.

    The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick is a quick, but thought pro­vok­ing novel. The premise is that a men­tally hand­i­capped man finds a let­ter his departed mom kept from Richard Gere, the famous actor and activist, and decides to spill his heart out in let­ters to the celebrity. Only that the let­ter was a form let­ter sent to help Tibet, and we’re not sure if his mom really was a fan.

    Nev­er­the­less, I liked the for­mat and humor in the book. I thought the author man­aged to tell an inter­est­ing story through the mus­ings and point of view of some­one who we would not think twice about.

    The nar­ra­tor, Bartholomew Neil, is con­stantly chal­lenged whether in his faith in the world or in G-d. His life has turned upside down, those who seem to want to help have a hid­den agenda which, as a gullible man, eludes him at every turn. I actu­ally felt bad for the guy who lived in a shel­tered, pro­tected world and now dis­cov­ers that every­thing he knew, from reli­gion to social ser­vices to soci­ety in gen­eral, are all hypocritical.

    This is a quirky book about pecu­liar peo­ple, every­one from the nar­ra­tor to the priest are sim­ply strange and pro­fane on sev­eral lev­els. I found the novel to be enjoy­able and quick but very thought pro­vok­ing on sev­eral levels.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    Uniquely Crafted Story

    If you like or know quirky, broken people, this will be an enjoyable read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2014

    Quirky Read

    Love it. Kept my attention. Some slow parts but a twist will pop up out of nowhere. The author takes us where we want to be elsewhere.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2014

    Great read

    Best description of this book is sweet and eccentric.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2014

    Loved this book. It was over before I wanted it to be.

    Funny and touching story.

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  • Posted March 19, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    At thirty-nine, Bartholomew Neil still isn't ready to leave his

    At thirty-nine, Bartholomew Neil still isn't ready to leave his mother's nest, but when he loses her to cancer, he's left with no other choice. His once-stable, once-routine world—of just him, his mother, and God—crumbles to pieces when one of his biggest role models, Father McNamee, consequently denounces himself from the Catholic church, and in turn, becomes more than just a religious father figure to Bartholomew, by becoming a human being.

    Convinced that his other beloved role model, Richard Gere, is watching over him now that God no longer is, Bartholomew begins a one-way correspondence; these letters are what make up the entire novel. This fantasy relationship he creates is the only thing that still connects him to his deceased mother, considering she was Richard Gere's biggest fan, and the sole belief that he is guiding Bartholomew as if they were old friends, leads to unexpected discoveries and profound self-inquiry.

    The unique narrator is what stood out to me, first and foremost. It is not a shock that Quick would write a protagonist who isn't quite normal—one who clearly suffers from a mental disorder, but internally, is the same as any and all of us: deeply, imperfectly human. Bartholomew isn't a grand hero, no, but he glows with sincerity and is a compassionate, warm character; his brilliantly observant and self-recognizing tone will capture the hearts of readers just as that of The Silver Linings Playbook did.

    Matthew Quick is skilled not only at providing perspective, but also at conveying the necessity of pretending—not out of delusion, but out of self-preservation—and the sheer magic of believing—whether through faith or through faithlessness. While the book is stylistically simple, it will make you think hard and think long; Bartholomew's introspection on religion, political correctness, and the nature of existence, will make your mind turn. There are moments where you'll disbelievingly relate, and resultantly be touched—fate—and the way the story proceeds rather messily, but falls into place, piece by piece—synchronicity—will provide immense comfort; this is a story for the soul. Whether through acts of God or through coincidence, Bartholomew's life changes gradually at the discovery of an unlikely cast of new friends, and through little achievements that propel him forward further than he could imagine; it is you, the privileged reader, who gets to go along for the ride.

    Pros: Requires deep thinking // Will make you reconsider the stigma of mental health disorders // Interesting perspective of a man's "delusions" // Casual, mellow style // Moves quickly; easy to read and keep reading // Story itself is synchronous as it comes into full circle // Distinct, unforgettable characters // Emotional, heartfelt

    Cons: Plot isn't terribly exciting; it's more the details and Bartholomew's day-to-day observances that make it interesting // Rushed, inconclusive ending

    Verdict: Pensive, honest, and appropriately quirky, The Good Luck of Right Now meditates upon the power of correspondence, the catharsis of confiding, and the definition of believing. Through writing descriptive, intimate letters to his lifelong idol—the ultimate coping mechanism—Bartholomew learns about independence, acquaintance, and ever-burning hope—a remedy for both him, and for readers all around. Fans of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime will rejoice in Matthew Quick's newest novel for its genuine, thoughtful reflections and its propensity for happy outcomes in the tumbling-together of stray paths.

    Rating: 8 out of 10 hearts (4 stars): An engaging read that will be worth your while; highly recommended.

    Source: Complimentary copy provided by publisher via tour publicist in exchange for an honest and unbiased review (thank you, Harper Collins and TLC!).

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    Excellent read

    I read Matthew Quick's "Silver Linings Playbook" and wanted to check his new book after enjoying the first. He again invents interesting characters with social inadequacies but his way of having them interact with each other makes this a great read. I truly enjoyed it--wanted to know more about what happens to the characters!

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    Posted July 2, 2014

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    Posted July 21, 2014

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    Posted August 4, 2014

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