Customer Reviews for

The Iliad (Ian Johnston Translation)

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

A classic that's last for over 2000 years

The Illiad, by Homer, is definitely one of the best books I have ever read. It actually is not necessarily a book; more like a poem. This poem-book tells of the legendary Trojan War between the Greeks and the Trojans. The whole thing kicked off when Hector ran away with...
The Illiad, by Homer, is definitely one of the best books I have ever read. It actually is not necessarily a book; more like a poem. This poem-book tells of the legendary Trojan War between the Greeks and the Trojans. The whole thing kicked off when Hector ran away with the Greek king's daughter, Helen. They then fled to Troy with it's near impassable structured walls. Zeus brought back the news to Mount Olympus, place of the gods, and every god took up arguments for both sides. Half sided with Troy while the other half sided with the Greeks. As the Greeks battled with the Trojans, it became clear that they were losing. So they decided on a trick. A selected few men would hidee inside a great wooden horse, dubbed, the Trojan Horse. The Trojans would wheel the horse in think it was a great prize. When nightfall came, the men jumped out and !opened the gate for the whole Greek army to come in. Troy was defeated soundly and the book ends with the funeral of Hector. A ten out of ten!

posted by AnonymousZS on April 14, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

I Love HOMER!!!!!!!!!!!!

Love hlm. Homer is A good guy He is asome!!!:-) ;-/ :-#

posted by Anonymous on January 25, 2012

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  • Posted April 14, 2009

    A classic that's last for over 2000 years

    The Illiad, by Homer, is definitely one of the best books I have ever read. It actually is not necessarily a book; more like a poem. This poem-book tells of the legendary Trojan War between the Greeks and the Trojans. The whole thing kicked off when Hector ran away with the Greek king's daughter, Helen. They then fled to Troy with it's near impassable structured walls. Zeus brought back the news to Mount Olympus, place of the gods, and every god took up arguments for both sides. Half sided with Troy while the other half sided with the Greeks. As the Greeks battled with the Trojans, it became clear that they were losing. So they decided on a trick. A selected few men would hidee inside a great wooden horse, dubbed, the Trojan Horse. The Trojans would wheel the horse in think it was a great prize. When nightfall came, the men jumped out and !opened the gate for the whole Greek army to come in. Troy was defeated soundly and the book ends with the funeral of Hector. A ten out of ten!

    10 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2008

    The Greatest Poem I've ever Read

    I'm only a few chapters into the book, but by far, this is the greatest poem I've ever read. Homer combines drama, action, and mythology into one. This is definately reccomended.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2004

    Anger Be Now Your Song Immortal One...

    The Iliad, as with other Greek poetry, was poetry intended to be recited orally as opposed to being read. Fitzgerald's backgroung in poetry brings out the lyrical passion of the Iliad so prized by the Greeks as no other translation has done. Other translations are also hampered by archaic English language and idioms that make little sense today. I strongly recommend this translation more than any other.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2007

    Don't let this book scare you!

    I bought this with the Sparknotes on The Illiad, which summarizes each 'book' (chapter) in the story. Once you have an idea of what's happening chapter by chapter, the book expands on the summary, and is really becomes an awesome read. Homer can describe in vivid detail the combat sequences. Once you get past the fact that this version is written in it's poetic form, and you read it just like a regular prose version, you will enjoy it. It is very affordable at under 8 bucks, so making notes, underlining parts that really strike you etc... won't make you feel like you are defacing anything. It's a must for any library.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2010

    The amazing story of The Iliad writen by Homer

    The Iliad is the story of the battle of Troy for a women named Helen who was taken captaive from here husband. All of the Greek city states were involved in this war and many famous heroes. The war lasted for 20 years and each side had many deaths. Two of the most famous men who fought at Troy were Achilles and Odyseus these two men made sure that they won the battle and got Helen back. They did not realise what a daunting task they would have infront of them until they arrived at Troy. The walls were said to be 100 feet tall and 50 feet thick at most parts. The battle of Troy is one of the most famous wars in all of history because of two things, it was the first to be over a women and have the gods help them in their victory. Also that it had lasted so long and how strategic each side had fought in the war.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2008

    Well..

    Well, it's funny when you refer to this as a book. It actually is an epic. If lacking the knowledge of poetry, an epic is in fact a branch of poetry. Overall, amazing, far better then the odyssey.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 14, 2010

    Cover a Turn-Off for Children

    Love this book! A must read for anyone who wants to understand where our epic tradition comes from - from the Bible and from Homer and Virgil. As someone who recommends books to kids, this particular edition is a hard sell because of the dull cover.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2008

    Excellent read

    The Iliad is definitely a must-read for anyone. As a student, I was required to read this for my World Literature class. As far as the mythology is concerned, it is absolutely fascinating, but even the historical perspective is amazing. This epic poem is probably still THE standard for Greek mythology.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2006

    Definitely an Epic

    I picked up this book because I figured it would help to better understand the allusions and references in future novels. Not only did The Iliad help with this but it also was a great read. The introduction by King was informative and emphasized the transformation of war into art.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2006

    An wonderful experience

    This book was confussing at first but after I look up some of the plots in the story I remembered seeing a movie about the Iliad. It was an incredible Book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2013

    I wish it included number lines

    I really enjoyed the book, but we had to read it for school and the ebook does not include number lines so it made it hard to follow in class.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2013

    2 blow

    Take ur little x and go dy with it up ur butthole its a good book

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    x

    x

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2012

    Iliad

    I read this for a project I have to do for my end of the year grade...it is awesome!

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  • Posted January 7, 2010

    A Must by for Mythology Fans

    The Iliad may be over 3000 years old, but the enthralling adventure is still apart of modern literature. Robert Fitzgerald has written a great translation of the Iliad. Along with translating the Iliad Fitzgerald creates a story of his own. The image of war is greatly emphasized in Fitzgerald's version of the book. He puts in image of the carnage of the battlefield then he does on just the story of Achilleus.
    Robert Fitzgerald paints an image of a bloody battlefield into the minds of his readers and in this he makes his translation unique. Most of the other translations of the Iliad put much emphasis on Achilleus and his journey to Troy. Robert instead tells the stories of everyone else and the hardships of the war. Here is an example of the image Robert paints of the battlefield, "Now both men disengaged their spears and fell on one another like man-eating lions or wild boars," (pg163 line298). That quote describes the battle between Hektor and Aias with such detail. By describing them as animals it helps in explaining the carnage of war.
    Robert Fitzgerald's Iliad is an amazing story about the struggles of the Achaians and the Trojans. Due to the fact Achilleus wouldn't fight makes the struggle for the Achaians a great one. The Trojans meanwhile have Hektor on their side, which gives them much morale throughout the many battles with the Achaians. Achilleus' anger is very prominent throughout the Iliad. His anger sparks many war changing moments for both sides. For example: "Not if his gifts outnumbered the seas sands or all the dust grains in the world could Agamemnon ever appease me-not till he pays me back full measure, pain for pain, dishonor for dishonor,"(pg209 line470). These are the words of Achilleus when Agamemnon tries to give gifts to him to appease his anger.
    Roberts translation is one that will not be forgotten. He rights or a new Iliad, not one of Achilleus, but one of a great war. Your time is well spent if you plan on reading this great book. Readers will not be disappointed in the enthralling adventures of the Iliad.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    greek mythology is reall

    greek mythology is reall this tealls you about it

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2007

    oh, yes and that tragic pride....

    ....the Iliad comes alive in its humor, tragic dimension as a lesson in human nature and the nature of conflicts and violence in general. A very apt and current manifesto of blind fury, deceit, petulence and an occasional moment of profound dignity.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2007

    I HATE THE ILIAD!

    The Iliad by Fitzgerald is by far the longest and most boring book I have ever read. It took me weeks to finish and bored me to tears. The book was overly descriptive, dull, and gory. I would not recommend it to teenagers or children as it is a classic and usually a college level read. My history teacher forced me to read it freshman year and I absolutely despised the book. This is a book for older men to read if they are into reading long winding passages with flowery dialogue and stupid details. There is so much blood, killing, and useless information. Too many characters are named in the book and there are over a hundred minor characters that are mentioned once and forgotten.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2005

    Stunning Brilliance !

    Laypersons and technicians alike will benefit from Prof. King's brilliance....King incisively probes the earliest form of war-mongering (relevant for today's events) as well as the highly lyrical structure of The Iliad. King¿s introduction shows The Iliad as pure art, or life imitating art, at the hands of an early empire builder and campaigning civilization...the Greeks.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2004

    The unknown Homer.

    (Before I start, let me presume you know the story).If people want you to read Homer they say things like: he's the father of western literature or: he stood at the cradle of our civilization. They probably are right but let me give you another reason to read the Iliad: the humour of Homer. I give two examples. When things turn sour for the Greeks and the Trojan soldiers almost destroyed their camp, Nestor - the military advisor for he's to old to fight - calls the young Greek soldiers at his side and tells them how brave and invincible he was when hé was young. You can imagine the Greeks listening politely but impatiently to Nestor's sermon. What Nestor means is that the youth of today is worthless. I've heard this before. What makes you smile is the bragging of Nestor and the fact that apparently the youngsters are worthless since three thousand years. Later on, when some of the gods reproach Zeus with not helping the Trojans, Zeus answers: 'You know my wife! If she finds out I'm helping Troy she will be mad at me!' If Homer was the father of literature then Zeus was the father of the henpecked husbands. If you are reluctant to read Homer, try to discover some other examples of Homer's humour.

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