Customer Reviews for

The Imitation of Christ

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

My favorite edition of this classic

As Msgr. Ronald Knox once said, if you find 'The Imitation' an 'easy read' then you're probably not getting much out of it. It's a tough book and it took me a long time to appreciate it. But at some point Thomas a Kempis' approach really hit home and became a source of ...
As Msgr. Ronald Knox once said, if you find 'The Imitation' an 'easy read' then you're probably not getting much out of it. It's a tough book and it took me a long time to appreciate it. But at some point Thomas a Kempis' approach really hit home and became a source of joyful and profound meditation. I've sampled numerous versions of 'The Imitation,' but I prefer the Penguin edition for its readability and scholarliness.

posted by Anonymous on May 25, 2004

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Beware Penguin translation!

Comparing the Latin text to the Penguin and Vintage translations, one finds in the 'vanity' section of chapter 1 that the Penguin actually leaves out the first sentence! The Vintage renders it 'It is vanity to seek riches that are sure to perish and put your hope in th...
Comparing the Latin text to the Penguin and Vintage translations, one finds in the 'vanity' section of chapter 1 that the Penguin actually leaves out the first sentence! The Vintage renders it 'It is vanity to seek riches that are sure to perish and put your hope in them.' The Penguin goes straight to the vanity of soliciting/pursuing honors. If the Penguin omits an entire sentence from the 1st paragraph, what else is wrong with it? Yikes. Try the Vintage Spiritual Classics edition (tr. Tylenda).

posted by Anonymous on April 30, 2003

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2003

    Beware Penguin translation!

    Comparing the Latin text to the Penguin and Vintage translations, one finds in the 'vanity' section of chapter 1 that the Penguin actually leaves out the first sentence! The Vintage renders it 'It is vanity to seek riches that are sure to perish and put your hope in them.' The Penguin goes straight to the vanity of soliciting/pursuing honors. If the Penguin omits an entire sentence from the 1st paragraph, what else is wrong with it? Yikes. Try the Vintage Spiritual Classics edition (tr. Tylenda).

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 25, 2014

    A Classic On Meditation

    The Imitation of Christ
    This book is a meditation on Biblical texts. It is an abridged, updated version of the original text first printed in 1472 shortly after Gutenberg's movable type spurred printing. The Nook version "contents" is not a table, it is a long sequence of chapter numbers and titles. This is visually confusing. The chapter titles are links but there are no underlines to identify hyperlinks.
    The Imitation of Christ is divided into three "books." The first book is titled Admonitions Profitable for the Spiritual Life. The second book is Admonitions Concerning the Inner Life and the third book is On Inward Consolation. The "book" are meant to be read together so are more like sections of the whole book.
    The first book, Admonitions Profitable for the Spiritual Life tells us what to leave behind. The beginning of book one is a plea to forsake not only the flesh but also knowledge in order to master the "self." This spiritual concept sets the tone for the whole work. This reminds me of the Eastern philosophy popular during those tumultuous days of the 1960's. As well the Beatles "Magical Mystery Tour" and J. D. Salinger comes to mind.
    The writer, Thomas A. Kempis, says a learned man does the will of God. He notes that the path to God is the way to happiness now and forever. The book is all about how to find God. But some thoughts are quite practical such as "don't be hasty in action or stubborn of opinion."
    An exploration of the "inner life" is the subject of book two, Admonitions Concerning the Inner Life. Using Biblical stories the author explains why we need to be Christ-like. Relevant events and discussions lead the reader through a journey towards inner life. The stories give the reader much to mediate upon.
    The "Inward Consolation," book three, has many brief and contemplative chapters. Again much of the wisdom here is both spiritual and personal. "The wise lover considers not the gift of the lover so much as the love of the giver," may be applied to the sacred or the profane. How timely and Zen-like is, "...people often strive passionately after things they desire, but when they have obtained them they begin to change their mind about them, because their affections toward them are not lasting but rather rush from one thing to another." Sounds like something many of us are experiencing today. Some blame advertising but perhaps we need to raise ourselves above the noise. The Imitation of Christ will help you do it. Mediate on one of the 56 chapters each day for cycle spiritual of learning.
    "Many men have opinions, and therefore little trust is to be placed in them. Moreover it is impossible to please them all." That was written over 500 years ago. Doesn't this sound like good advice today. That is why this gem from the past still sparkles with wisdom today.

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