Customer Reviews for

The Inventor and the Tycoon: The Murderer Eadweard Muybridge, the Entrepreneur Leland Stanford, and the Birth of Moving Pictures

Average Rating 3.5
( 33 )
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5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(5)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Brilliant and boring

This book is incredibly well written, with phrases like "buxom cheeks" and other poetic vocabulary. It has much too much detail, and it seems to strain at times to make these two men represent two different trends in society. It ends up being boring because of its sheer...
This book is incredibly well written, with phrases like "buxom cheeks" and other poetic vocabulary. It has much too much detail, and it seems to strain at times to make these two men represent two different trends in society. It ends up being boring because of its sheer length. I could only read 2/3 of it before I dropped out. I may come back to it later, though.

posted by PVF on January 27, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

The Inventor and the Tycoon is the story of how moving pictures

The Inventor and the Tycoon is the story of how moving pictures first came to be. It's the story of an a quest by railroad tycoon Leland Stanford and photographer Edward Muybridge trying to answer one question: does a horse ever leave the ground entirely while running. ...
The Inventor and the Tycoon is the story of how moving pictures first came to be. It's the story of an a quest by railroad tycoon Leland Stanford and photographer Edward Muybridge trying to answer one question: does a horse ever leave the ground entirely while running. The book is also largely about Edward Muybridge's trial for murder.

The topic is really interesting. However, I really didn't enjoy Mr Ball's style of writing. He jumps back and forth between the murder and the moving picture. He jumps back and forth between Stanford and Muybridge, and seems to randomly jumps to different points in their lives. In a few passages, Mr. Ball makes an allegation for how Stanford or Muybridge saw an event, and offers no actual evidence of his allegation.

The topic is very interesting, but if you decide to read this book, bring a big bag of patience.

posted by chellandandy on February 7, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Wasted plot

    An interesting idea for a plot but wasted on too much detail. The book should be half the length it is, loses the reader between needless background and observations by the author. Lost my interest about 1/2 way. If you're looking for a book on history of America and what made our country, look elsewhere for the development of the railroad system. Don't buy.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2013

    a different era.

    author kept repeating himself many times, could, nor did i wish to further read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2013

    Not sure I can keep plodding on

    I thought this was going to be a true crime- not! On page 101 and have already started skimming. I rarely give up on a book but i might have to with this one. Way too much detail on photography - too much detail on everything. Where is the STORY?

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  • Posted February 23, 2013

    Disappointed

    It seemed there was alot of supposition and littel substance. This book could have been written in 50 pages or less including the table of contents. While the story was interesting it had little to due with the murder and more to do with the backgrounds of both men. I will admit it is nice to know how Stanford University came to be named.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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