Customer Reviews for

The Jesus Mysteries: Was the "Original Jesus" a Pagan God?

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Find the Christ in You!

I found this book to be very thought provoking and well worth reading. I have been questioning the Jesus Story for years. I was raised Christian, in the Methodist Church, but as an adult I've questioned how God, being a loving God, would expect us to buy into this par...
I found this book to be very thought provoking and well worth reading. I have been questioning the Jesus Story for years. I was raised Christian, in the Methodist Church, but as an adult I've questioned how God, being a loving God, would expect us to buy into this paranormal story when all around us we see God's beauty in nature and the natural world. How could the Creator of the Universe expect Man (with our God given brains) to believe such non sense. But I continued to question; if this was just a Pagan Religion how did it survive for so long when the other Pagan religions did not? Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy do a wonderful job of laying out the evidence of which I have suspected for many years doing my own research on the subject. They showed how The Church in Rome revised the original writings of the early Christians to spin it into a super-natural event that was never intended to be taken as literal. The one thing that I was surprised about was how sad I felt after realizing how much time we've lost developing our true spirituality by trying to buy into this fable. I just wish more Christians would take the time to learn about the early Christians and who they thought Jesus really was. And you won't get it from the Bible. That's like learning about The Democratic party from the writings of the Republicans or visa versa. The Church doesn't want us to know the real beginnings of Christianity so you have to search outside of the Church. The Jesus Mystery theory makes much more sense than anything I've read from any Bible expert. The Jesus Mystery theory helps to understand the Bible for what it really was intended, especially the New Testament. It also takes my guilt away for trying to develop my personal relationship with God on my own... which is what I feel Jesus' message is all about. The Kingdom of God is among You, not in a book written by MEN thousands of years ago! Peter said "The Christ IN you"... not "Christ IS in you". The masses of people parading to church on Sunday are trying to convince themselves they buy into the Pagan Story of Jesus, but it's not necessary! The Church has guilted you into believing or you'll be damned to hell!... what a great way to keep you people under control! It's time to stand up for yourself...find your own personal Christ within you. You can still be a Christian and not have to buy into this Fable! It's OK! God loves all of us and we'll all make it to heaven. He didn't intend for us to buy into someone else's idea of God. You have to find God within yourself. It's just a shame that The Church hasn't evolved as man has, and God intended. Think People... use your God Given Brains!

posted by pmc0808 on February 20, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Raises interesting points

The negative reviews here, unfortunately, offer only attacks without any evidence or even a coherent argument at all. It does, however, highlight one of the weaknesses of the book -- too quickly glossing over the "evidence" that the Christian Church has asserted to not ...
The negative reviews here, unfortunately, offer only attacks without any evidence or even a coherent argument at all. It does, however, highlight one of the weaknesses of the book -- too quickly glossing over the "evidence" that the Christian Church has asserted to not only provide a historical story for Jesus and the foundation of their religion, but the dogma embodied in church teachings. The authors did an adequate job in the early segments of the book on drawing parallels with pagan religious practices and teachings (some of the pagan texts are downright creapy to read because of the close alignment to standard Catholic/Lutheran prayers and teachings. Although reading the book one might immediately dismiss 2000 years of Christian history and dogma, the authors are a little too quick to make correlations between similar practices and beliefs to be evidence of the big Christian lie. The authors' very general lumping of all pre-Christian religions together in order to find comparisons in practices stretches the argument a bit -- although there are some similarities between the Egyptian's Ossiris, Platonic teachings, and other pagan traditions as part of the ancient mysteries, they are far from any coherent or consistent progression in religious/philosophical beliefs. For those contemplating reading the book, please note that the authors' central thesis on the "pagan god" is based upon a definitiion of paganism that essentially includes hundreds of different elements of pre-Christianity based upon the ancient mysteries (not simply the traditional notions of pagan orgies, sacrifices, etc. that have been portrayed by the Christian Church). All and all, a very interesting book that raises a serious thesis. What would be fascinating is to read a credible counter from the Christian realm that might explore the weaknesses in the thesis and provide a better argument about the historical evidence that the Church offers. However, most Christians will angrily dismiss the book because it raises serious doubts that they are unwilling or unable to confront in their own "faith" and agnostics (like myself) will find it yet another set of interesting (although not new) arguments for Christianity being a well-written myth/fantasy.

posted by Anonymous on January 27, 2003

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Find the Christ in You!

    I found this book to be very thought provoking and well worth reading. I have been questioning the Jesus Story for years. I was raised Christian, in the Methodist Church, but as an adult I've questioned how God, being a loving God, would expect us to buy into this paranormal story when all around us we see God's beauty in nature and the natural world. How could the Creator of the Universe expect Man (with our God given brains) to believe such non sense. But I continued to question; if this was just a Pagan Religion how did it survive for so long when the other Pagan religions did not? Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy do a wonderful job of laying out the evidence of which I have suspected for many years doing my own research on the subject. They showed how The Church in Rome revised the original writings of the early Christians to spin it into a super-natural event that was never intended to be taken as literal. The one thing that I was surprised about was how sad I felt after realizing how much time we've lost developing our true spirituality by trying to buy into this fable. I just wish more Christians would take the time to learn about the early Christians and who they thought Jesus really was. And you won't get it from the Bible. That's like learning about The Democratic party from the writings of the Republicans or visa versa. The Church doesn't want us to know the real beginnings of Christianity so you have to search outside of the Church. The Jesus Mystery theory makes much more sense than anything I've read from any Bible expert. The Jesus Mystery theory helps to understand the Bible for what it really was intended, especially the New Testament. It also takes my guilt away for trying to develop my personal relationship with God on my own... which is what I feel Jesus' message is all about. The Kingdom of God is among You, not in a book written by MEN thousands of years ago! Peter said "The Christ IN you"... not "Christ IS in you". The masses of people parading to church on Sunday are trying to convince themselves they buy into the Pagan Story of Jesus, but it's not necessary! The Church has guilted you into believing or you'll be damned to hell!... what a great way to keep you people under control! It's time to stand up for yourself...find your own personal Christ within you. You can still be a Christian and not have to buy into this Fable! It's OK! God loves all of us and we'll all make it to heaven. He didn't intend for us to buy into someone else's idea of God. You have to find God within yourself. It's just a shame that The Church hasn't evolved as man has, and God intended. Think People... use your God Given Brains!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2003

    Raises interesting points

    The negative reviews here, unfortunately, offer only attacks without any evidence or even a coherent argument at all. It does, however, highlight one of the weaknesses of the book -- too quickly glossing over the "evidence" that the Christian Church has asserted to not only provide a historical story for Jesus and the foundation of their religion, but the dogma embodied in church teachings. The authors did an adequate job in the early segments of the book on drawing parallels with pagan religious practices and teachings (some of the pagan texts are downright creapy to read because of the close alignment to standard Catholic/Lutheran prayers and teachings. Although reading the book one might immediately dismiss 2000 years of Christian history and dogma, the authors are a little too quick to make correlations between similar practices and beliefs to be evidence of the big Christian lie. The authors' very general lumping of all pre-Christian religions together in order to find comparisons in practices stretches the argument a bit -- although there are some similarities between the Egyptian's Ossiris, Platonic teachings, and other pagan traditions as part of the ancient mysteries, they are far from any coherent or consistent progression in religious/philosophical beliefs. For those contemplating reading the book, please note that the authors' central thesis on the "pagan god" is based upon a definitiion of paganism that essentially includes hundreds of different elements of pre-Christianity based upon the ancient mysteries (not simply the traditional notions of pagan orgies, sacrifices, etc. that have been portrayed by the Christian Church). All and all, a very interesting book that raises a serious thesis. What would be fascinating is to read a credible counter from the Christian realm that might explore the weaknesses in the thesis and provide a better argument about the historical evidence that the Church offers. However, most Christians will angrily dismiss the book because it raises serious doubts that they are unwilling or unable to confront in their own "faith" and agnostics (like myself) will find it yet another set of interesting (although not new) arguments for Christianity being a well-written myth/fantasy.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2003

    open your mind...

    Literalist Christians will dismiss this book, and that is to be expected. It's what they do, dismiss facts. However, for the open-minded, this is an enlightening read, combining much of the dispersed information regarding early Christianity into one volume. To quote from the book, from Celsus: "It matters not a bit what one calls the supreme god--or whether one uses Greek names or Indian names or the names used formerly by the Egyptians." It's all the same god. Stop killing each other over differences in a name.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2002

    Great Book, but Nothing New...

    I highly recommend this book, however, I would caution the beginner with the following: There really isn't anything new in this book. The authors try to make the book read like they have discovered something unheard of before. The truth is, people have been discussing this for years. Secondly, the authors tend to imply, whether that is their intent or not, that all the groups they speak of are of one congruent and systematic thought... this is not the case. Yet, these two short comings aside, this is a great introduction for the person just beginning their quest for the origins of Christianity. I have recommended this book to several friends already.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2004

    Thank you for debunking the Christian claptrap

    Fascinating book that takes apart each piece of the Christian myth bit by bit and shows how it was lifted <i>entirely</i> from the religions that came before it. I think people who descend from the original Mithraists should sue the Christian church for copyright infringement.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2011

    Finally!!!

    This book is the answer to a search I have performed many times over to find an author who has laid out plainly the ties that Christianity has to its pagan predecessors. I immensly enjoyed this book and it is on my Favorites shelf.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2005

    Digging Deeper

    A very intruing read. Digs deep to find the possible roots of early Christianity. Gives evidence of the transformation of early Pagan mystics into the early Christian thoughts.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 15, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    too much evidence to ignore this theory

    too much evidence to ignore this theory

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  • Posted April 9, 2011

    understanding the meaning of agnostic

    this is a great book for understanding the differences in beliefs of the agnostic and literalist christians. it talks about the greek philosophers and how they influenced the branches of christianity

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2004

    Reason Wins Again

    This is a fantastic book! Every Christian should read it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2002

    Garbage

    This book is basically trash. Facts are distorted with truths and scripture taken out of context. No self-respecting anybody would give any credit or admiration to this work.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted December 11, 2011

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    Posted August 5, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2010

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    Posted July 30, 2009

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    Posted September 4, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2011

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    Posted January 18, 2010

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    Posted January 19, 2010

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