Customer Reviews for

The Jungle: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

Average Rating 4
( 324 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(136)

4 Star

(104)

3 Star

(50)

2 Star

(18)

1 Star

(16)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

18 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

My favorite book of all time

I read this book back when I was in middle school and to this day (starting graduate school soon) it still remains my favorite book of all time. Even though I am a Laissez-faire Capitalist and am not too fond of the last chapter, I am a vegetarian and someone who is goi...
I read this book back when I was in middle school and to this day (starting graduate school soon) it still remains my favorite book of all time. Even though I am a Laissez-faire Capitalist and am not too fond of the last chapter, I am a vegetarian and someone who is going into public service. I still find it interesting that Sinclair's book had to be toned down because if he had described the situation even more accurately, readers wouldn't have been able to keep down their lunches. I love how he tells the story of this immigrant family. The first chapter is a little slow, but it really helps the reader to understand how difficult it can be to blend two cultures.. and it is also symbolic because the tail end of the wedding celebration foreshadows the family's hardships that are later to come. If you have never read this book.. please do so ASAP.

posted by AggieFencer on March 27, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

....

Seriously dude!! How do you expect Glimmer to like you when all you do is go on and on about how much you hate her? Great tactics man!! Seriously! That is not the way to win someone's heart, and going on about how much you love them isn't going to help either.

posted by Anonymous on February 5, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 326 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 17
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    About as depressing a story as you can get

    And here is where cliff notes would really help if required class reading. When my grandson went to a pioneer village and saw them processing a pig he refused to eat meat for months. Now family is split into lacto veggies veggies fish veggies chicken/fish no pork and one no gluten. holiday dinners have become pot luck but my goodness what you can do with tofu chicago no longer has a stock yard and processing is else where and industry still has same problems pagecounter

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2013

    Don't read unless you are a masochist and want to cry all the ti

    Don't read unless you are a masochist and want to cry all the time. Just don't. 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Twilight

    Shrugs. I like being dramatic :3

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2013

    Coal

    Ok. Comeback soon.

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2012

    GREAT BOOK!!!! One of the best books ever written!!!!

    GREAT BOOK!!!!
    One of the best books ever written!!!!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Just what I wanted!

    I needed a copy of The Jungle to use in my classroom - this was perfect and simple! No need to take a trip to the bookstore.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 17, 2012

    Great Book!!!!!

    This is a really eye opening book. Unbelievable that people really had to live this way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    just o.k.

    i don't feel like there was good resolution to the main charcter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 3, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Eh, I'm glad it was free....

    I really wanted this book to be good. It gives a vivid description of "worker" life at the turn of the century, yet the ending leaves something untold. The book is filled with atrocities that leave the reader wanting to know what happens to it's characters, however the reader is left with socialist propaganda to ponder...Like I said, I'm glad the download was free.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 6, 2011

    Not the best...

    I had to read this book for English, and right away, there was something about the beginning that made me NOT want to read it. I wasn't lazy or anything, it's just a very unappealing book. The events are unrealistic and the message of socialism is basically shouted at you towards the end of the novel. Definitely not one of my favorites. :/

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2011

    A sad tale

    This is the book that drove Congress to pass the Pure Food and Drug Act. It is more of a tale of immigrants finding their way than a description of the meatpacking industry. The plot follows a Lithuanian immigrant named Jurgis Rudkus, whose family falls apart as time progresses. His wife dies, his son drowns in a street, his immediate family is torn apart. Jurgis even becomes a cog in the graft machine. The tale may be a bit exaggerated; Jurgis is a combination of the experiences many immigrants at the time were having.
    The descriptions of the way meat was treated are disgusting. The only annoying part of the book was the last 1/4 or so basically being a socialist manifesto. It was moving given the character's condition.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 25, 2011

    THE JUNGLE GONE WILD

    Taylor Deats

    "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair, was published in 1965. "The Jungle" is a fiction book. I picked thus book because we learned about Upton Sinclair in Social Studies, and his book looked interesting.
    "The Jungle" is about health issues in the late 1800's. The main character in this book is a boy named Jurgis. The book takes place in a meat packing factory in Chicago. During the time this book came out Theodore Roosevelt was president and he read the book. Theodore said after reading this book every factory must pass with an inspection.
    The book is very interseting. I would suggest you to read it, the reason why you shouldn't read it is because it takes for ever to get to the excitement and the story. I would rate this book 3 stars out of 5 because of the beginning.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    Tragic

    This was a tragic account of a Lithuanian man and his family who came to America seeking freedom, but only found more hardships than they had in Lithuania. It was upsetting to see Jurgis, the protagonist, and his family fall apart in a society that was unrealistically cruel to the proletariat. The description of the harsh working conditions and the poor wages made the story even more depressing. However, there was a good ending when the idea of Socialism came into play. I was very much affected by this story and was almost sad when it was over. There were parts that I thought were great. On the other hand, there were parts that had a lot of detail which I had trouble understanding. A valuable book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2011

    is jungle appropiate for younger teens or older pre-teens

    i mean is it appropiate for ages 12-18?can anyone tell me?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 21, 2010

    Propaganda with a Purpose

    The Jungle / 978-1-411-43387-8 Propaganda is, by its very nature, always the least subtle of art forms. Make no mistake about it, The Jungle is propaganda. But it is propaganda with a root and a purpose, and Sinclair does not disappoint. He tells the harrowing tale of immigrants to America who find, slowly, painfully, that their sweet, naive natures make them easy pickings for the vultures who have gathered to feast on them. Workers work long hours for little pay, under hazardous conditions, with nothing but a "Bad luck, Chuck" and a pat on the back if maimed or killed at the workplace. Leases for housing and furniture are written in incomprehensible legalese and the lawyers hired to protect them are in league with the owners seeking to cheat them. Even a staple like food works against them, as they unwittingly drink milk colored with white paint to cut prices and boost sales. The food they eat kills them, the house they live in consumes them, the work they do destroys them. By the time they realize that the only "real" way to get along in this cold world would have been to become wolves themselves (if only the women had been hooking all this time, one woman laments tearfully), it is too late - their children are cold and dead, their lives are ruined. This book is a stunning reminder to each of us the sheer amount of trust we place in the world around us. We trust that the food we eat will not poison us, despite knowing that the regulatory agencies that 'care' for us are deeply politically and financially tied to those who we are supposed to be protected from. We trust that the contracts we sign will be honored, that the mortgages we contract will be legitimate. We trust that if the worst happens at our workplace, we and our family will be cared for. Sinclair reminds us that life is not always so simple, and is never so simple for the poorest of us. ~ Ana Mardoll

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Book That Effects Everyones Lives Today

    Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" is a Forest Gump like romp through life in early twentith century life in and around Chicago's meat packing district. Originally published as a serial published by a Socialist newsletter. Sinclair was later able to self publish full version himself about a year later. The book, which meant to spotlight the difficult and unfair working conditions in the stockyards managed to change instead the way we eat. The main character is a Lithuanian immigrant who finds himself examinine society, culture, labor and politics from many different points of view through the story. Never have I read a story that packed so much tragedy upon one man within the span of one novel. The man suffers physically, mentally and economically in so many different ways. Yet it is somehow completely believeable and not overboard as it could easily have been. Though the book is a work of fiction, it is very much like reading the story of real lives from the past. I'm sure this life is not uncommon for the times. In fact, despite being over 100 year old, this story could easily be mistaken for something that takes place in recent times. The only disappointment I had in the book was the political soap boxing that take place at the end. Some classics are known for the markets they leave on their genre or literature and the written word. This is a classic for the mark it left on our culture.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 13, 2010

    Chicago at It's Worst!

    Imagine a period of time when there where meat packing plants that produced us products made from tubercular beef, cholera infested pork and even humans after they accidentally fell in lard rendering vats.

    It's a horrible thought but it happened in the Chicago meat packing plants during the early 1900's.

    Follow the story of Jurgis and his family as they struggle through slave wages, unfair housing, prostitution, crime, sickness and death as they try to assimilate into American culture.

    I don't recommend reading this on a weak stomach.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 25, 2010

    An Interesting and Informative Read

    The Jungle is an investigative narrative based off the author Upton Sinclair's own experiences in the Chicago stockyards. While famous for detailed descriptions of foul meat (which led to the creation of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906), for me the novel had the most impact in connecting the reader with the characters. I felt personally inserted into the struggles of Jurgis Rudkis and his immigrant family. Every downward turn in their lives made me read on to see a sign of light in their future. Unfortunately, the family is constantly bombarded by tragedy after tragedy: this was one of the few negative aspects of the novel. Though definitely not for the faint of heart, I recommend Upton Sinclair's The Jungle to everyone and anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Classic exposure of capitalism

    This great novel exposes the appalling, brutal exploitation of American workers. Upton Sinclair shows how the employer uses unemployment to keep wages low and conditions vile.

    He also shows how the employer Durham used immigration to undermine the workers. "The Bohemians had come then, and after them the Poles. People said that old man Durham himself was responsible for these immigrations; he had sworn that he would fix the people of Packingtown so that they would never again call a strike on him, and so he had sent his agents into every city and village in Europe to spread the tale of the chances of work and high wages at the stockyards. The people had come in hordes; and old Durham had squeezed them tighter and tighter, speeding them up and grinding them to pieces, and sending for new ones. The Poles, who had come by tens of thousands, had been driven to the wall by the Lithuanians, and now the Lithuanians were giving way to the Slovaks."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Proves the Importance of Organized Labor

    This book accurately depicts how American workers were treated by employers before there were unions and employee rights. It demonstrates why unions are good and necessary, especially in our greedy, capitalistic society.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 21 – 40 of 326 Customer Reviews
Page 2 of 17