Customer Reviews for

The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill, Volume 1: Visions of Glory, 1874-1932

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

18 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

Outstanding - a must read

Manchester's account of the life of Winston Churchill is absolutely on the mark. The biographer does an outstanding job of detailing Churchill's career, pointing out the ways in which Churchill stood out as a genius among his peers, but is also quick to note his human ...
Manchester's account of the life of Winston Churchill is absolutely on the mark. The biographer does an outstanding job of detailing Churchill's career, pointing out the ways in which Churchill stood out as a genius among his peers, but is also quick to note his human failings, giving a well-balanced view of this remarkable and enigmatic man. The book is quick and lively, full of detail but never dry. Particularly enjoyable are Manchester's descriptions of English thought and society - and how they changed - throughout Churchill's lifetime, thus giving a background upon which to better understand the bases of Churchill's actions and opinions. I would recommend this title (and it's sequel) to anyone interested in reading an entertaining and informative story of one of the greatest men born to history.

posted by Anonymous on December 31, 2001

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 57 people found this review helpful.

.......not a secret anymore......, (1 of 2)

Actually it is very sad to mention this blunder against humanity:

When the Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers in October and November 1914, Britain's communications with India and the East via the Suez canal was immediately placed in jeopardy.

...
Actually it is very sad to mention this blunder against humanity:

When the Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers in October and November 1914, Britain's communications with India and the East via the Suez canal was immediately placed in jeopardy.

There was a secret agreement with Germany signed in August 1914 by the Young Turks that was troubling the Russians and taken as warning of the forthcoming trouble to The Tsar. The Russians regarded their Caucasian terrirories were also placed in jeopardy.
Consequently, the British and French, in order to protect their future `colonies' and bisect the `sick man of Europe', had to act forcefully. They opened another front in the South with the Gallipoli (1915) and Mesopotamian campaigns.

Anxious to score his first military encounter with `the enemy', Winston Churchill, in his capacity as Lord of Navy, prematurely urged a combined French and British naval incursion into Gallipoli. But the Turks were successful in repelling the British, French, and Australia and New Zealand Army Corps. and pushed their eventual withdrawal and evacuation.

((By contrast, in Mesopotamia - Iraq- after the disastrous Siege of Kut (1915-16), British Empire forces - mainly of Indian troops - reorganized and captured Baghdad (March 1917). Further to the west in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign, initial British failures were overcome when Jerusalem was captured in December 1917, and the Egyptian Expeditionary Force under Field Marshal Edmund Allenby, broke the Ottoman forces at the Battle of Megiddo in September 1918))

posted by Beirut768 on November 10, 2008

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  • Posted November 10, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    .......not a secret anymore......, (1 of 2)

    Actually it is very sad to mention this blunder against humanity: <BR/><BR/>When the Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers in October and November 1914, Britain's communications with India and the East via the Suez canal was immediately placed in jeopardy. <BR/><BR/>There was a secret agreement with Germany signed in August 1914 by the Young Turks that was troubling the Russians and taken as warning of the forthcoming trouble to The Tsar. The Russians regarded their Caucasian terrirories were also placed in jeopardy. <BR/>Consequently, the British and French, in order to protect their future `colonies' and bisect the `sick man of Europe', had to act forcefully. They opened another front in the South with the Gallipoli (1915) and Mesopotamian campaigns. <BR/><BR/>Anxious to score his first military encounter with `the enemy', Winston Churchill, in his capacity as Lord of Navy, prematurely urged a combined French and British naval incursion into Gallipoli. But the Turks were successful in repelling the British, French, and Australia and New Zealand Army Corps. and pushed their eventual withdrawal and evacuation. <BR/><BR/>((By contrast, in Mesopotamia - Iraq- after the disastrous Siege of Kut (1915-16), British Empire forces - mainly of Indian troops - reorganized and captured Baghdad (March 1917). Further to the west in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign, initial British failures were overcome when Jerusalem was captured in December 1917, and the Egyptian Expeditionary Force under Field Marshal Edmund Allenby, broke the Ottoman forces at the Battle of Megiddo in September 1918))

    2 out of 57 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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