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The Late Great Planet Earth

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

A landmark book...

Hal Lindsey¿s 'The Late Great Planet Earth' is truly a landmark work, having sold tens of millions of copies since its original publication over thirty years ago. Lindsey articulates a clear and concise roadmap for where the world is heading, using Old and New Testamen...
Hal Lindsey¿s 'The Late Great Planet Earth' is truly a landmark work, having sold tens of millions of copies since its original publication over thirty years ago. Lindsey articulates a clear and concise roadmap for where the world is heading, using Old and New Testament Bible prophecies as the strength of his argument. The central belief put forth by Lindsey is that Jesus Christ is returning to earth soon, probably in this generation, and the Bible clearly states that certain events will foreshadow the Second Coming. First among these is the rebirth of Israel as a nation-state, an event predicted long ago by the Old Testament prophets. Jesus himself pointed this out as the seminal sign that his return was very near when he said, 'Now learn a lesson from the fig tree. When its buds become tender and its leaves begin to sprout, you know without being told that summer is near. Just so, when you see the events I¿ve described beginning to happen, you can know his return is very near, right at the door.' (Matthew 24:32-33). Throughout the Bible, the nation of Israel is often referred to symbolically as a fig tree. Lindsey¿s argument is straightforward. The prophets of the Bible predicted the rebirth of Israel in a single day. It happened (14 May 1948). The same prophets predicted Israel would again possess Jerusalem. That also happened (June 1967). So it makes sense to explore the other assertions made by those same prophets, such as the establishment of a Third Jewish Temple and the ascendance of a powerful individual who will shortly thereafter 'rule over every tribe and people and language and nation' on the earth (Revelation 13:7). Lindsey explores the personality of this man, traditionally identified as the Antichrist, and also delves into prophecies of predicted political alliances and major end-times events. Overall, this is a great book ¿ although some of the more speculative parts are quite dated. My version is from 1993, and I don¿t know if the book has been revised, but the speculative parts and statistics from the early 1970s are few and far in between. Most of the book focuses on scriptural prophecy, only commenting to inject clear references to the Biblical meaning of words and phrases. 'The Late Great Planet Earth' is one of the best starting points for those who wish to learn more about what the Bible has to say about humanity¿s future, and I highly recommend it to students of Bible prophecy. >>>> Britt Gillette, Author of 'Conquest of Paradise: An End-Times Nano-Thriller'

posted by Anonymous on July 2, 2003

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Pop Theology Gone Mad

The pathetic example of pop theology found in this book, as in his other books, represents the very worst in pop theology. Possibly Mr Lindsey is a Dadaist master? Far-fetched speculation, contorted reasoning, and attempts to cram by brute force current events into an...
The pathetic example of pop theology found in this book, as in his other books, represents the very worst in pop theology. Possibly Mr Lindsey is a Dadaist master? Far-fetched speculation, contorted reasoning, and attempts to cram by brute force current events into ancient prophecies, in such a way that shows a complete lack of understanding of both the present and the ancient world, are the basis for this book. Speculation ad absurdum is the very quintessence of this book. On some of the early editions of these books which I possess, you can see a nice picture of the author at Stonehenge, England. And maybe the astute reader can discern the true purpose for these books. Unveiling the mysteries of the Bible is not the motive whatsoever. Lindsey lacks the knowledge, the sophistication and the interpretive skills to understand anything involving these complex matters. But he is indeed intelligent enought to know that pop theology sells, and sells well. Well enough to have made the author a multi-millionaire who can afford trips to Cancun, San Tropez, Rio and of course Stongehenge. Well, I guess you can't argue with success. Religion, esp. pop religion like pop music is big business and with a potential market of almost 200 million people in the USA, there's a wad of cash to be made. Lindsey isn't the first to join the Modern pop-Eschatological bandwagon, just perhaps the most successful, the guru of the End Times. However, the poor fellow is getting some serious competition with a Mr. Tim LaHaye and his imaginative fiction which is at least called fiction by him. Lindsey does not call his eschatology what it is in esse, mere speculative piffle, the purest claptrap that has not one iota of truth behind it, moreover it is only remotely Biblical. What you get in these books has nothing to do with God or Jesus and everything to do with an imagination and speculation run amok. Do not waste one cent on this. It is simply forcing the modern world to fit into the Biblical fantasies of long dead and ignorant men. It's like forcing a square peg into a round hole. It will not fit, it cannot fit. None of the Biblical writers or prophets had the foggiest notion of our time, and contrary to popular belief, their prophesies all of them concerned their present time or their immediate future. Neither they nor anyone else at their time could have cared less about events 2000 years in the future, anymore than people of today are concerned about events in the year 6432 C.E. We don't care who rules the world thousands of years after we are dead, we care about who'll win the election in 2008. And so likewise, were the people of the Biblical ages. The books of Revelation and Daniel become transparent and easily understood when read in the context of the times they were written, but become mere buffoonery when forced into our own time. Sound theologians have known all of this for hundreds of years. But it is pop theology that sells. It is pop theology that provides us with the pleasantest fantasies, that divorce us the furthest from reality, meanwhile the World stubbornly refuses to end on schedule and the Christ has still left his bride standing all lonely and forlorn at the altar. But I have a theory here, albeit speculative, but no more so than any of Lindsey's flights of fancy. I ask you this: If you were Christ, would you come back and claim your modern day followers as your bride? Would you accept those who have twisted, and contorted your life and your teachings so far from reality as to have buried the true Jesus of Nazareth in a grave of interpretive mishmash and drivel. I'd bet you'd probably look for intelligent followers elsewhere in the Universe, as you'd find none here on Earth!

posted by Anonymous on February 13, 2007

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2007

    Pop Theology Gone Mad

    The pathetic example of pop theology found in this book, as in his other books, represents the very worst in pop theology. Possibly Mr Lindsey is a Dadaist master? Far-fetched speculation, contorted reasoning, and attempts to cram by brute force current events into ancient prophecies, in such a way that shows a complete lack of understanding of both the present and the ancient world, are the basis for this book. Speculation ad absurdum is the very quintessence of this book. On some of the early editions of these books which I possess, you can see a nice picture of the author at Stonehenge, England. And maybe the astute reader can discern the true purpose for these books. Unveiling the mysteries of the Bible is not the motive whatsoever. Lindsey lacks the knowledge, the sophistication and the interpretive skills to understand anything involving these complex matters. But he is indeed intelligent enought to know that pop theology sells, and sells well. Well enough to have made the author a multi-millionaire who can afford trips to Cancun, San Tropez, Rio and of course Stongehenge. Well, I guess you can't argue with success. Religion, esp. pop religion like pop music is big business and with a potential market of almost 200 million people in the USA, there's a wad of cash to be made. Lindsey isn't the first to join the Modern pop-Eschatological bandwagon, just perhaps the most successful, the guru of the End Times. However, the poor fellow is getting some serious competition with a Mr. Tim LaHaye and his imaginative fiction which is at least called fiction by him. Lindsey does not call his eschatology what it is in esse, mere speculative piffle, the purest claptrap that has not one iota of truth behind it, moreover it is only remotely Biblical. What you get in these books has nothing to do with God or Jesus and everything to do with an imagination and speculation run amok. Do not waste one cent on this. It is simply forcing the modern world to fit into the Biblical fantasies of long dead and ignorant men. It's like forcing a square peg into a round hole. It will not fit, it cannot fit. None of the Biblical writers or prophets had the foggiest notion of our time, and contrary to popular belief, their prophesies all of them concerned their present time or their immediate future. Neither they nor anyone else at their time could have cared less about events 2000 years in the future, anymore than people of today are concerned about events in the year 6432 C.E. We don't care who rules the world thousands of years after we are dead, we care about who'll win the election in 2008. And so likewise, were the people of the Biblical ages. The books of Revelation and Daniel become transparent and easily understood when read in the context of the times they were written, but become mere buffoonery when forced into our own time. Sound theologians have known all of this for hundreds of years. But it is pop theology that sells. It is pop theology that provides us with the pleasantest fantasies, that divorce us the furthest from reality, meanwhile the World stubbornly refuses to end on schedule and the Christ has still left his bride standing all lonely and forlorn at the altar. But I have a theory here, albeit speculative, but no more so than any of Lindsey's flights of fancy. I ask you this: If you were Christ, would you come back and claim your modern day followers as your bride? Would you accept those who have twisted, and contorted your life and your teachings so far from reality as to have buried the true Jesus of Nazareth in a grave of interpretive mishmash and drivel. I'd bet you'd probably look for intelligent followers elsewhere in the Universe, as you'd find none here on Earth!

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2003

    A landmark book...

    Hal Lindsey¿s 'The Late Great Planet Earth' is truly a landmark work, having sold tens of millions of copies since its original publication over thirty years ago. Lindsey articulates a clear and concise roadmap for where the world is heading, using Old and New Testament Bible prophecies as the strength of his argument. The central belief put forth by Lindsey is that Jesus Christ is returning to earth soon, probably in this generation, and the Bible clearly states that certain events will foreshadow the Second Coming. First among these is the rebirth of Israel as a nation-state, an event predicted long ago by the Old Testament prophets. Jesus himself pointed this out as the seminal sign that his return was very near when he said, 'Now learn a lesson from the fig tree. When its buds become tender and its leaves begin to sprout, you know without being told that summer is near. Just so, when you see the events I¿ve described beginning to happen, you can know his return is very near, right at the door.' (Matthew 24:32-33). Throughout the Bible, the nation of Israel is often referred to symbolically as a fig tree. Lindsey¿s argument is straightforward. The prophets of the Bible predicted the rebirth of Israel in a single day. It happened (14 May 1948). The same prophets predicted Israel would again possess Jerusalem. That also happened (June 1967). So it makes sense to explore the other assertions made by those same prophets, such as the establishment of a Third Jewish Temple and the ascendance of a powerful individual who will shortly thereafter 'rule over every tribe and people and language and nation' on the earth (Revelation 13:7). Lindsey explores the personality of this man, traditionally identified as the Antichrist, and also delves into prophecies of predicted political alliances and major end-times events. Overall, this is a great book ¿ although some of the more speculative parts are quite dated. My version is from 1993, and I don¿t know if the book has been revised, but the speculative parts and statistics from the early 1970s are few and far in between. Most of the book focuses on scriptural prophecy, only commenting to inject clear references to the Biblical meaning of words and phrases. 'The Late Great Planet Earth' is one of the best starting points for those who wish to learn more about what the Bible has to say about humanity¿s future, and I highly recommend it to students of Bible prophecy. >>>> Britt Gillette, Author of 'Conquest of Paradise: An End-Times Nano-Thriller'

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2008

    How could I have missed this book?

    I wish I¿d picked up this book on the amazing truth of biblical prophecy when it was first published -- I might not have spent 30+ years jousting with windmills. Even now, it¿s an exciting read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2007

    Watch the Middle East

    When I read this in the 70s it convinced me that some more things are knowable than that the sun rises. I can't say it changed my life since I was always changing, but some things never change. You can see in the LGPE that Spirit-breathed prophecy stands the test of time. The enemy never changes either--desperate that you not believe. Search the Scripture--Lindsey hasn't gotten everything perfect, but enough for you to find useful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2005

    outstanding

    I have read this book many times. I have also watched the things spoken of in this book come to life. It is one of the most amazing books I have ever read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2005

    Thought provoking, intellectually challenging!

    I read this book when I was quite young back in the 80's. Although some of the author's 'interpretations' of prophecy didn't or doesn't appear to be coming to pass, I was never under the assumption that Mr. Lindsay was, himself, a prophet. This book is merely a collection of one man's ideas and what he believes is going to happen. Maybe some of his 'ideas' have been off (I personally don't believe in a secret rapture) but consider this: In his book, 'Blood Moon' he correctly predicted that a non-Italian pope would succeed John Paul II and that his reign would be short (Pope Benedict is 78), back in 1996. The next pope (after Benedict) in his story became the anti-christ. We shall see! People need to take/read this book in its proper perspective. It's not the Bible; but it is, in the least, challenging, thought provoking and one thought leader's opinion of how this world, as we known it, will end.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2002

    worth the money - worth the read

    this is still in print becuase it is one of the best books on bible prophecy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2002

    Horrible Author

    Takes Bible Study and makes a joke out of it. Failed to look at any historical evidence of the 1st Century Christian persecutions, when the book was written. Would recommend it to anyone that wants a sensationalist way of viewing scripture without actually looking into the true meaning.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 1999

    The Book you should never skip .....

    THis book clearly interprets the sciptures about end days i.e prior to Jesus second coming. And explains about the final war. I am really blessed by reading this book. I wish that every christian should read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2014

    I read this book back in the 70s. Well here we are all of these

    I read this book back in the 70s. Well here we are all of these years later. He was wrong about so much. If the things he predicted had come true, then the world should have ended by now. I don’t know how anybody can get so much wrong and still retain any credibility. Basically the problem with this book is that it suggests the biblical book of Revelation was intended for us in our time. NO! Look at it again. It was written to seven specific churches and it was prophesying to them about things that were going to happen in their time not ours. It’s not a book it’s a letter, it was written to them. The things in Revelation already happened nearly 2000 years ago. That’s why so many people like Hal have made so many mistakes with this subject.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2009

    THOUGHT PROVOKING

    Maybe I'm one that doesn't agree with the findings of this author. I saw the movie first in 1978. It haunted me for many years because I couldn't figure out who the enemy is. I don't have a religious upbringing so naturally it confused me. I do understand that God does have a kingdom in the after life but I also believe that He wouldn't want anyone to live in torment until the final day arrives (whatever that means anyway) so He can come down and defeat Satan. I tell people to believe in themselves and be original. God doesn't want everybody to think the same. There is plenty of hope in the world. If man figured it out, there is plenty of food to feed the world if man would only try. Pancho Villa once said there will always be war if one man's belly is full and another man's belly is empty. I can't say that this is a proper quote. I don't hate anyone. I wish that Mr. Lindsey would focus more on the return of Christ rather than warning people about the danger of the Antichrist. If you're getting up putting on your clothes and shoes so you can go to work, it's not too late. As long as you're alive it's not the end of the world. That is my opinion anyhow. Good luck to the wonderful great Earth that God has created for all of us to enjoy! peace out and take care!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 2, 2009

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