BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

The Light in the Ruins

Average Rating 4
( 129 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(64)

4 Star

(37)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

37 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

I've read some WWII books set in Germany (City of Women, The Lif

I've read some WWII books set in Germany (City of Women, The Life of Objects), France (Suite Francaise)  and England (The Guernsey Potato Peel & Literary Society and Phillip Rock's Abingdon Pryory trilogy), but I hadn't read many set in Italy.
Chris Bohjalian return...
I've read some WWII books set in Germany (City of Women, The Life of Objects), France (Suite Francaise)  and England (The Guernsey Potato Peel & Literary Society and Phillip Rock's Abingdon Pryory trilogy), but I hadn't read many set in Italy.
Chris Bohjalian returns to historical fiction again after his last novel, The Sandcastle Girls, was set after WWI in Armenia during the genocide there. This time in The Light in the Ruins, we meet the Rosatis, Italian descendants of nobilty. They have a lovely large mansion near Florence and life is good until Italy decides to throw its fortunes in with Hitler's Germany.
What I find interesting about many of these books is the theme of what happens to people who want nothing to do with war, who do not support their government. They cannot openly defy their government, and they can hide from the war for only so long before it comes to their doorstep.
The story takes place both during WWII and ten years later when someone begins to murder the surviving members of the Rosati family. Daughter-in-law Francesca, who lost her husband and children to the war, is brutally butchered. It is thought that she picked up a strange man who killed her, until another Rosati is murdered.
We meet a female Italian homicide detective, Serafina Bettini, which is a unique job for a woman in Italy in the 1950s. Serafina has a fascinating past, and as the story unfolds, we discover her connection to the Rosatis. I loved this character and would enjoy seeing Serafina in another book (hint hint Mr. Bohjalian). Bohjalian has a knack for writing interesting, complicated female characters (Midwives, The Double Bind,  The Sandcastle Girls).
The book moves back and forth in time, and we see how the Rosatis are drawn further into the war. One son, Francesca's husband, is an engineer who ends up on the front lines. Another son is an art historian, and his job is protecting art from falling into the hands of the Nazis. This part of the story intrigued me, and I learned much about a topic I had not known about before.
The youngest Rosati, Cristina, falls in love with a young German soldier, and this complicates matters. Her family is upset, and the townspeople, some of whom are resistance fighters, distrust the Rosatis. They feel that the Rosatis have thrown their lot in with the Nazis and deserve whatever misfortune comes their way.
War is hell, and their is plenty of horrific atrocities that take place in the book. Even though as a reader you brace yourself for it, the things that happen are shocking and brutal. The Rosatis have to deal with the Germans, and then the Russians as they come through looking for the Germans. The horrors of war come right into their home and the result is devastating.
There is so much in this book to recommend. The history, the characters, the setting (it has increased my desire to visit Italy), the mysteries (who is killing the Rosatis and why, and what happened to Serafina during the war), they all come together in the skilled hands of Chris Bohjalian.
I lost myself in The Light in the Ruins and isn't that really why we read books? This is one of the best books I have read this year.

posted by bookchickdi on July 12, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Almost half of the 5 star ratings as of 8/5 are from nookie text

Almost half of the 5 star ratings as of 8/5 are from nookie texters talking about themselves, no bearing on the rating of this book. Please get out of the review process and go somewhere else - if books sell based on nook raters, you are helping to skew everyone's view...
Almost half of the 5 star ratings as of 8/5 are from nookie texters talking about themselves, no bearing on the rating of this book. Please get out of the review process and go somewhere else - if books sell based on nook raters, you are helping to skew everyone's view of the book. Barnes and Noble - please help. Other readers - report every review as not helpful, flag it for off topic, complain at your B&N store - please do something to help.

posted by Anonymous on August 5, 2013

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 129 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 7
  • Posted July 12, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I've read some WWII books set in Germany (City of Women, The Lif

    I've read some WWII books set in Germany (City of Women, The Life of Objects), France (Suite Francaise)  and England (The Guernsey Potato Peel & Literary Society and Phillip Rock's Abingdon Pryory trilogy), but I hadn't read many set in Italy.
    Chris Bohjalian returns to historical fiction again after his last novel, The Sandcastle Girls, was set after WWI in Armenia during the genocide there. This time in The Light in the Ruins, we meet the Rosatis, Italian descendants of nobilty. They have a lovely large mansion near Florence and life is good until Italy decides to throw its fortunes in with Hitler's Germany.
    What I find interesting about many of these books is the theme of what happens to people who want nothing to do with war, who do not support their government. They cannot openly defy their government, and they can hide from the war for only so long before it comes to their doorstep.
    The story takes place both during WWII and ten years later when someone begins to murder the surviving members of the Rosati family. Daughter-in-law Francesca, who lost her husband and children to the war, is brutally butchered. It is thought that she picked up a strange man who killed her, until another Rosati is murdered.
    We meet a female Italian homicide detective, Serafina Bettini, which is a unique job for a woman in Italy in the 1950s. Serafina has a fascinating past, and as the story unfolds, we discover her connection to the Rosatis. I loved this character and would enjoy seeing Serafina in another book (hint hint Mr. Bohjalian). Bohjalian has a knack for writing interesting, complicated female characters (Midwives, The Double Bind,  The Sandcastle Girls).
    The book moves back and forth in time, and we see how the Rosatis are drawn further into the war. One son, Francesca's husband, is an engineer who ends up on the front lines. Another son is an art historian, and his job is protecting art from falling into the hands of the Nazis. This part of the story intrigued me, and I learned much about a topic I had not known about before.
    The youngest Rosati, Cristina, falls in love with a young German soldier, and this complicates matters. Her family is upset, and the townspeople, some of whom are resistance fighters, distrust the Rosatis. They feel that the Rosatis have thrown their lot in with the Nazis and deserve whatever misfortune comes their way.
    War is hell, and their is plenty of horrific atrocities that take place in the book. Even though as a reader you brace yourself for it, the things that happen are shocking and brutal. The Rosatis have to deal with the Germans, and then the Russians as they come through looking for the Germans. The horrors of war come right into their home and the result is devastating.
    There is so much in this book to recommend. The history, the characters, the setting (it has increased my desire to visit Italy), the mysteries (who is killing the Rosatis and why, and what happened to Serafina during the war), they all come together in the skilled hands of Chris Bohjalian.
    I lost myself in The Light in the Ruins and isn't that really why we read books? This is one of the best books I have read this year.

    37 out of 41 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 9, 2013

    Reading Chris Bohjalian is like savoring my favorite wine. I ca

    Reading Chris Bohjalian is like savoring my favorite wine. I cant wait to pick it up and devour it and I hate to put it down. Every book he writes just gets better and better. I especially love this one and the setting is another character all its own. Makes me want to head to Italy. If you are a Bohjalian fan you will pick it up and if you have never read Chris, this one will hook you and you will head back to Barnes and Noble and say...what else can I read. No spoilers here, just a strong recommendation for a must read from someone who loves books....now what are you waiting for, go get it.

    24 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2013

    The short review: Brilliant! Go order this right now. You


    The short review:





    Brilliant! Go order this right now. You’re welcome.



    The long review:



    This story is told in alternating chapters. Some chapters are based in 1943 and others are in 1955. All is set in Italy. Interspersed are short chapters related to the individual who is killing the remaining Rosati family. The main female characters are Serafina and Christina. In 1943, both women are teenagers and in many ways are polar opposites of each other. Christina Rosati is a teenager who has everything to lose due to the ongoing war and Italy’s alliance with Germany. Slipping away is her privileged life as the only daughter of a marchese, along with her very first romance. Unfortunately, this romance is with a German officer. Serafina on the other hand has nothing to lose, because all for her is already lost. Her family has been killed and her only option is to join up with partisan’s fighting against the Nazis, who have been busy pillaging anything of value from Italy, under the guise of being allies.



    By 1955, Serafina is a detective and is assigned to a investigate the case of who is gruesomely murdering the Rosatis. Because of this, she meets up with Christina. At this point, both women have more similarities than differences. Both carry the emotional scars that the end of the war brought them and Serafina has the added burden of physical scars from an event that occurred as the German’s were trying to flee Italy.



    This story was very intense. It is one of those books that was so suspenseful, I did not want to put it down. I could not read fast enough, yet I didn’t want it to end. This was so well written that I felt every heartache, every scary moment, and at the end, I was surprised at the identity of the killer.



    Chris Bohjalian is on my very, very short list of favorite authors. I have discovered that having “favorite” authors can be a double edged sword. Yes, in most instances, books that I have read by a favorite are typically very good. Sometimes though, the level of anticipation and expectation sets the bar so high that I’m not sure the books even have a fair chance to come up to snuff.



    Not so with The Light in the Ruins. I thought this was outstanding and was far beyond anything I had expected. Bravo Mr. Bojhalian.



    I am grateful to Doubleday Books, via Netgalley, for allowing me to read this in exchange for an unbiased review.

    12 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    Almost half of the 5 star ratings as of 8/5 are from nookie text

    Almost half of the 5 star ratings as of 8/5 are from nookie texters talking about themselves, no bearing on the rating of this book. Please get out of the review process and go somewhere else - if books sell based on nook raters, you are helping to skew everyone's view of the book. Barnes and Noble - please help. Other readers - report every review as not helpful, flag it for off topic, complain at your B&N store - please do something to help.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2013

    Excellent book

    I'll admit it: I had a hard time getting into this book. The two time periods alternated back and forth, making it hard to follow the story ar first. Linear story-telling is much simpler, but having read other books by this author I was willing to hang in there for one long sitting! I am so glad I did! Excellent story, creative who-done-it, not an expected ending. Worth reading!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 9, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    The Light in the Ruins is a phenomenal novel. The characters are

    The Light in the Ruins is a phenomenal novel. The characters are well developed and worthy of the reader's investment. Nazis (of course) make for great villains.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

    Interesting read

    I enjoyed the historical background of the story but did find it confusing as the chapters went back and forth between the characters.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 20, 2013

    Try this author if you don't already know him

    My favorite reads are best-seller murder mysteries, and historical fiction. This book had both elements, and I liked going back and forth between WWII and occupied Italy, and "modern day"-1950's murders. I just discovered this author, which is like reaching into a candy jar and being surprised that a delicious new chocolate is in your hand.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Chris Bohjalian has another hit!!   Chris Bohjalian pens another

    Chris Bohjalian has another hit!!   Chris Bohjalian pens another spectacular book with The Light in the Ruins.  I have read several of Chris' books and have not found one yet that I didn't like.  The story opens in 1955 with the murder of Francesca Rosati.  Like Skeletons at the Feast,thought,  his latest effort is primarily set set late in WWII, as the tide is turning away from the Germans and toward the Allies.  The focus of the story is the life of the Rosati family, who are headed by a marchese and marchesa, and live in their Tuscan villa. 




    First of all, Chris is a consummate story-teller.   In most of his books, the chapters alternate between viewpoints.  Sometimes it is the differing viewpoints of the characters, but in this case it is between the events of 1943 and 1955 when Francesca is murdered in Florence.  Chris is one of the best authors out there when it comes to telling a story from alternate viewpoints, and in The Light in the Ruins he does this by making use of both alternate time periods and alternate character viewpoints.  I especially like the way that he threw in the thoughts of the murdered every once in a while.  I found myself looking for clues in these small chapters to try to figure out who the murderer was.  In addition, his descriptions really make the settings come alive for me.  Another thing that I liked about this book, and most of Chris' books, is that there is usually a bit of a twist at the end.  I have not been able to figure out these "reveals" in most of his book, and this book was no different.  I really enjoy when an author can surprise me with something relevant at the end of the story.  If I know this is coming, I find myself trying to figure it out throughout the book and it really keeps my interest. 




    As for character development and use, there is none better than Chris Bohjalian.  Once again, in this book, he has crafted characters perfectly suited to illustrate the many sides of  his story.  In this book there are two pairings that do this well.  There are the brothers Rosati, who are participating in the war in very different ways, but the best example is the pair of Cristina and Serafina.   The similarities and juxtapositions between these two characters was a great way to show the alternate sides of the story.  Both women were the same age, both women were heavily affected by the war, but their lives, both in 1955 and 1943, couldn't have been more different. 




    The thing that I like the best about Chris Bohjalian's work, though, is the way that he can weave a story around such different subjects.  None of his books really resemble the others.  Sure there are similarities, but when I pick up a book by Chris I know two things.  One, that I will enjoy the stories, settings, characters, etc., and two, that it will not be a rehashed or retold version of any of his other stories.  Most importantly, I know it will be an enjoyable experience that I will not want to end.   Thanks to Chris and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Book for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for my review. 

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2013

    Great book

    Fantastic read

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

    This is an excellent read; full of suspense.

    I could not put this book down. The page by page suspense kept me "glued" to the story. If you are fascinated by events that occurred during World War 11, then you will enjoy this book. Chris Bohjalian is an excellent author and I would definitely recommend this book to a book club.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 25, 2013

    marvelous

    I could not put this down litterly.I like it so much I went and bought his Mid Wife haven't started it yet because I have company and have to get some work done and if it is like The light in the Ruins I wont get anything done.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2013

    Excellent

    Excellent book: the style, the plot, the History behind the plot everything contributes to make this book one you cannot let go of.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 23, 2013

    I thought this was a great book.  There a several stories intert

    I thought this was a great book.  There a several stories intertwined, and it jumps back & forth between 1943 & 1955 Italy, but is so well written that I had no trouble keeping things straight.  I honestly didn't know much about the Italian involvement in WWII, and this book inspired me to research!  I will definitely pick up more of Mr. Bohjalian's books, and absolutely recommend this one!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2013

    Fascinating book!

    I found the book a little slow at first but overall found it to be one of the best books I've ever read. Fascinating characters!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2013

    Another outstanding novel from Chris Bohjalian. I've read almos

    Another outstanding novel from Chris Bohjalian. I've read almost all of them and have never been disappointed. His characters, setting and plot keep you riveted to the last page. If you have not read any of his books, start anywhere and savor the ride. Congratulations, Chris.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2013

    Another winner by Bohjalian!

    I thought Sand Castle Girls was excellent, but this book is more excellent! Learned things about WW2 that I had not known before and my Mother/Father In Law were Italian. An excellent mystery, a little love story. Moves at a fast pace and not until the last pages does it all come together. Any of Bohjalian books are good reads!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 2, 2013

    Really enjoyed it!

    Very well written. Learned some more about the European Theater during WWII. Love historical fiction.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

    A "must" read

    Great book, loved the plot. Mr. Bohjalian never seems to disappoint.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    A Compelling Tale of War, Honor, and the Vagaries of the Human H

    A Compelling Tale of War, Honor, and the Vagaries of the Human Heart
    I would like to thank Vintage Books for granting me the opportunity to read this wonderful story in exchange for an honest review. Although I received this book for free, that in no way impacts my review.


    <blockquote>From the New York Times bestselling author of <em>Midwives</em> and <em>The Sandcastle Girls</em>  comes a spellbinding novel of love, despair, and revenge—set in war-ravaged Tuscany.

    1943: Tucked away in the idyllic hills south of Florence, the Rosatis, an Italian family of noble lineage, believe that the walls of their ancient villa will keep them safe from the war raging across Europe. Eighteen-year-old Cristina spends her days swimming in the pool, playing with her young niece and nephew, and wandering aimlessly amid the estate’s gardens and olive groves. But when two soldiers, a German and an Italian, arrive at the villa asking to see an ancient Etruscan burial site, the Rosatis’ bucolic tranquility is shattered. A young German lieutenant begins to court Cristina, the Nazis descend upon the estate demanding hospitality, and what was once their sanctuary becomes their prison.

    1955: Serafina Bettini, an investigator with the Florence police department, has her own demons. A beautiful woman, Serafina carefully hides her scars along with her haunting memories of the war. But when she is assigned to a gruesome new case—a serial killer targeting the Rosatis, murdering the remnants of the family one-by-one in cold blood—Serafina finds herself digging into a past that involves both the victims and her own tragic history.

    Set against an exquisitely rendered Italian countryside, <em>The Light in the Ruins</em> unveils a breathtaking story of moral paradox, human frailty, and the mysterious ways of the heart.</blockquote>



    Right off I must admit that I am a fan of Chris Bohjalian's work. I've read the majority of his books, and like any good author he continues to improve his craft with each new release. This is not to say that the subject material of each new story will appeal to all, but his talent continues to grow regardless of the topic at hand. I approached this book as a fairly blank slate, having deliberately avoided all reviews and talk about the book, so that I might experience it without any preconceived notions. For the most part I was successful, only getting one adjective about the book before delving into it.

    This is a moving tale of family, love, betrayal, insanity, murder. Told in segments that switch back and forth between past and present, this story unfolds in an unusual manner, but one that so very well suits the tale being told. And every so often the killer briefly interjects, but without ever dropping any hints as to their identity or motivation. The past was mostly about the Rosatis' experiences during the final years of the war. Yet there was also some speculation about Serafina Bettini's experiences at the end of the war, which she has no memory of. However she has a map of scars to constantly remind her something cataclysmic happened to her. She remembers her activities working with her created family, which consisted exclusively of a group of dedicated partisans, but nothing of her final hours of the war. 

    The Rosatis, headed by the marchese Antonio, and his wife Beatrice, the marchesa, stuck to the values inherited with their position. While they lived fairly well, the Villa Chimera being a lovely home, complete with a swimming pool, they always tried to ensure the local villagers were cared for as well. They raised cattle and sheep on their land, along with a small vineyard and olive grove. In addition to the marchese and marchesa, Villa Chimera was home to their youngest child, eighteen-year-old Cristina, as well as their eldest son's wife Francesca, and their two small children, Massimo and Alessia. 

    Both sons had been conscripted into the Italian military, to work alongside Italy's German allies. Their eldest son Marco had been sent down to Sicily, while their younger son Vittore was put to work as an assistant of sorts for the current German leader in the area, Colonel Decher. On the surface Vittore's job was to help explain the artwork to Decher, but at the same time do he was doing his level best to keep the Germans from plundering all their valuable artwork.

    The Rosatis were backed into supporting the Nazis in the area, earning them the enmity of the villagers. Yet it all was not as it seemed. The Germans repeatedly culled their herd of cattle and sheep, as well as anything growing in their gardens, until nothing was left. Only Cristina seemed untouched by the changes taking place around her, and that was because of the German lieutenant Friedrich Strekker, Colonel Decher's adjunct. Maybe it was because her family lived in such isolation, or because she had missed out on all the balls and parties Francesca had attended at her age, but Cristina made a choice to follow her heart and be with Friedrich Strekker, regardless of the fact that he was German. They became lovers, a choice that made her feel more alive, which she reveled in. However that did not mean that she like any of the other Germans, but it didn't matter as she was branded as a whore regardless. 

    All of this unfolds throughout the course of the book, while at the same time the story of the killer is expanded. And the killer moves up into the realm of serial killer after the second Rosatis dies. The killer takes both lives in such a way that it is clear that the murders aren't coincidental. Someone is after the Rosatis family. Serafina Bettini and her partner must figure out why that particular family has been targeted in order to figure out who is after them. During all this Serafina is confronted with her missing past, slowly uncovering what happened. The question she must answer is if there is any link between her missing time and the Rosatis family. Being a partisan would have put her in direct opposition with the Rosatis family, who were trapped into being Nazi supporters. Given that conflict, if there is a link with the Rosatis family, will it impact her ability to do her job?

    Beautifully told, Mr. Bohjalian makes the people and places come alive. He pulls you into the story so that you are living it with the characters. Characters he has made you feel something for, be it a positive or negative response. The action and growth of the characters are perfectly matched with the arc of the story, maintaining spot-on pacing throughout. The story is gripping, and the end shocking, with the reveal of the killer perfectly done. Never once did I suspect the right person as the killer, nor guess the reason for their incendiary feelings toward the Rosatis.  

    Tumultuous and painful, this story covers the gamut of human emotions with grace and respect, showing Bohjalian's deft touch with the characters he brings to such vivid life. The feelings the characters experience will resonate with the reader for some time to come. Definitely a must-read book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 129 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 7