Customer Reviews for

The Lincoln Deception

Average Rating 3.5
( 21 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction book

You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction books from which he enriched our understanding of the United States Constitution and how it was created, from the point of view of those 55 men who created it in that, Summer of 1787.

He also delved into the ...
You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction books from which he enriched our understanding of the United States Constitution and how it was created, from the point of view of those 55 men who created it in that, Summer of 1787.

He also delved into the question of why a president, who simply fired his Secretary of War, was Impeached and nearly convicted in the Senate for doing so.

And in his latest offering, he treats us to an investigative and most perplexing portrait of a sitting vice president who killed our nation’s first Treasury Secretary in 1804. But it was the author’s treatment of Aaron Burr’s frightening political vision, in stark contrast to what the founders fought for, that makes American Emperor such a compelling and thought-provoking read.

It’s instructive to realize that some authors have trouble making the transition from one writing style (in this case, non-fiction) to another (fiction), but not this author.

In his debut performance as a fiction writer, David O. Stewart proves once again that his prowess as a page-turning author and storyteller has not wavered one iota from his non-fiction offerings.

In The Lincoln Deception, Mr. Stewart takes a factual event—the dying utterance of John Bingham, the man who prosecuted the Lincoln conspirators—and spins it into a period yarn that is an historic eye opener. He successfully crafted each chapter that compels the reader on, the sign of a great suspense writer.

And something more esoteric that can easily be missed by anyone who reads a period work; Mr. Stewart very specifically captured the flavor of race relations in turn-of-the-century 1900 America with regard to the Jim Crow laws and how our protagonists (one white male and one black male) were treated by other characters as well as how they reacted to each other.

Yet another triumph for Mr. Stewart that should find its way into the classroom!

posted by M_DeStefano on October 2, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Great read!

Enjoyed this thoroughly.

posted by Anonymous on January 11, 2014

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  • Posted October 2, 2013

    You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction book

    You know him from his three, thoroughly crafted non-fiction books from which he enriched our understanding of the United States Constitution and how it was created, from the point of view of those 55 men who created it in that, Summer of 1787.

    He also delved into the question of why a president, who simply fired his Secretary of War, was Impeached and nearly convicted in the Senate for doing so.

    And in his latest offering, he treats us to an investigative and most perplexing portrait of a sitting vice president who killed our nation’s first Treasury Secretary in 1804. But it was the author’s treatment of Aaron Burr’s frightening political vision, in stark contrast to what the founders fought for, that makes American Emperor such a compelling and thought-provoking read.

    It’s instructive to realize that some authors have trouble making the transition from one writing style (in this case, non-fiction) to another (fiction), but not this author.

    In his debut performance as a fiction writer, David O. Stewart proves once again that his prowess as a page-turning author and storyteller has not wavered one iota from his non-fiction offerings.

    In The Lincoln Deception, Mr. Stewart takes a factual event—the dying utterance of John Bingham, the man who prosecuted the Lincoln conspirators—and spins it into a period yarn that is an historic eye opener. He successfully crafted each chapter that compels the reader on, the sign of a great suspense writer.

    And something more esoteric that can easily be missed by anyone who reads a period work; Mr. Stewart very specifically captured the flavor of race relations in turn-of-the-century 1900 America with regard to the Jim Crow laws and how our protagonists (one white male and one black male) were treated by other characters as well as how they reacted to each other.

    Yet another triumph for Mr. Stewart that should find its way into the classroom!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2014

    Great book

    The plot to kill lincoln had to involve greater political will then just the known conspirators. This is a great book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    Excellent yarn.

    A must read for history buffs. From one grain of factual data, Stewart spins a believable yarn of possibilities.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2013

    G

    Y

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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