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Customer Reviews for

The Lives of Tao

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

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(1)

2 Star

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

It appears that despite every sane person laugh at him, the man

It appears that despite every sane person laugh at him, the man with the crazy hair, Giorgio A. Tsoukalos of History Channel's Ancient Aliens, was right all along...the course of human history was really steered along by aliens!

The Lives of Tao manages to tell a very ...
It appears that despite every sane person laugh at him, the man with the crazy hair, Giorgio A. Tsoukalos of History Channel's Ancient Aliens, was right all along...the course of human history was really steered along by aliens!

The Lives of Tao manages to tell a very entertaining tale in which there is an ongoing, centuries long war between 2 opposing factions of an alien race that has been living on earth. One of which cares about humans and are obviously the 'good guys' and a more hardline faction that primarily is only concerned about their own race and doesn't care about any negative impact to humanity.

Conventional logic would have you think an advanced alien race that can make it all the way to earth would have no problems living here, but as it turns out their big Achille's heel is that they cannot survive here on Earth without living inside a host body. This host usually ends up being a human being, and the alien symbiote can communicate with their human host as a voice in their head and attempt to influence their decision making. And as it turns out, most of the famous historical figures in human history were also hosts to aliens.

In addition to the scifi and action aspects of the book, Wesley Chu manages to create a main character, Roen Tan, which you find very human and believably 'average' at first vs the many stories where the hero is always some lethal, man-killing weapon who is the object of lust for every straight female he crosses paths with. Roen is basically what many would characterize as a stereotype overweight, out of shape computer geek, loser without much going on in his life at least until Tao the alien ends up having to take on Roen as his human host. Now guided by a centuries wise Tao, Roen must transform into an actual agent that can fight for the good guys. But poor Roen...the baddies want to kill Tao, which means they need to kill Roen. So Roen basically has no choice but train now. I don't want to say its a story partly about his coming of age, but more of a forced late bloomer, Men in Black secret 007 agent walking along railroad tracks with the Stand by Me from Ben E. King playing in the background. Once you read the book, you'll know what I'm talking about.

As an extra benefit of having a super James Bond alien in your head, Roen may even grow the balls to talk to women! I think there are probably many guys out there that would pay to have a coach like that in their head for that function alone.

The bromance between Roen and Tao starts up slow, but you can see it developing fuller along the way. Some of Tao's wise ass comments to Roen made me laugh.

OVerall, I really enjoyed being there for all the failures, successes, and hilarious moments... and there are many...in Roen's journey to transform himself into the improved Roen, along with flipping page after page to find out who will be winning this age old war and the impact on humanity. I won't say too much else about the story so it doesn't spoil it for people who haven't read it yet.

The Lives of Tao is highly recommended.

posted by 17565698 on May 10, 2013

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Dont bother

Poor characters, poor story. Not worth the money if it was free.

posted by 471032 on May 4, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2013

    Dont bother

    Poor characters, poor story. Not worth the money if it was free.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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