Customer Reviews for

The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

The way of the future

The long tail is a thorough research study. I found it to be a facinating look into the future. Very well written and relative to all of those who are interested in how the internet has changed the way we view the worlds economy.

posted by stugood on March 28, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

Could not download

Despite the fact that this eBook was supposed to be free with the in-store access code, I could not access this eBook because the site wants me to choose a default credit card. Why would I need to choose a default credit card when I just want to pick up a free eBook?

posted by 3851314 on June 19, 2010

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  • Posted January 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    An intriguing and insightful book

    Chris Anderson is an editor-in-chief of the Wired magazine, and the eponymous article 'The Long Tail' appeared in that magazine a couple of years ago. This has been one of the most influential and read articles about the 'new economy', and rightfully so. In a few succinct principles it describes and explains the essential aspect of the several new successful business models, including Google, Amazon, eBay, Netflix, to name just a few. The basic mechanisms behind the model, however, have been around for a long time, but the advent of the Internet has spurred it on to previously unimaginable successes. This book builds on the arguments from the original article, and adds the material from Chris's blog. It's highly informative, yet eminently accessible and readable. A warning is in order, however: after reading the book you might start seeing long tails in all sorts of places. Consider yourself warned.

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  • Posted August 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Insightful information that makes the complicated understandable!

    You have to read it to understand it. In short, it explains why online selling can be succerssful without selling the main items in a category. You begin to wonder if the shift will close big box stores? Will people bypass renting DVDs or buying CDs? The future is digital!

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  • Posted November 17, 2008

    A Great Book!

    The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More by Chris Anderson provides an overview of the purchasing pattern that has emerged with online retailers offering an abundant selection of material. A good example of this pattern is that according to Anderson, every track on iTunes has been downloaded at least once. Traditional stores can only carry so many products due to space limitations, but with stores and other retailers offering huge selections online, customers can almost always find what they are looking for. As Anderson says, ¿Bottom line: A Long Tail is just culture unfiltered by economic scarcity.¿<BR/>One of the reasons I liked the book was because Anderson showed numerous other examples of where the Long Tail can be applied to other industries. In addition he provided a detailed history of the Long Tail¿s routes. He says that ¿the true roots of the Long Tail and unlimited shelf space go back to the late nineteenth century and the first giant centralized warehouses¿near the junctions of railways lines in the American Midwest.¿<BR/><BR/>The one section of the book that I liked the most with respect to a current event in technology was the chapter entitled ¿The New Producers: Never Underestimate the Power of A Million Amateurs with Keys to the Factory.¿ In this section, Anderson shows the effects of technologies such as Wikipedia that enable literally anyone to contribute to this Long Tail right from their home computer.<BR/><BR/>One of my criticisms of the book is that Anderson didn¿t spend very much time discussing industries and goods without Long Tails. One of the things that the Long Tail relies on is highly differentiated products which can cause small niches to develop. Therefore, in industries with very homogeneous products it is harder for a long tail to develop.<BR/><BR/>Overall, it was a very good book and I highly recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2006

    A witty look at the ways cyberspace rewrites retailing's rules

    Does the modern world of online markets make you feel like Rip Van Winkle, who awoke from a 20-year nap to find a changed society? Author Chris Anderson has your wake-up call. With hard facts, charts and numbers, plus futuristic insights, Anderson decodes the mysteries of online marketing, Internet-based commerce and other New Age economic realities. His calculations, public feedback and extensive research offer more than just statistics for the sake of proving his point: Online retailing has a long reach into niche markets. This gives its products longevity that stores with finite shelf space can¿t match, no matter how much steam they get from short-lived, blockbuster products. Anderson credibly explains the decline in box office sales and the rise of niche companies such as Netflix and iTunes. Despite a few redundancies (he believes in thorough explanations), keep on reading. You won¿t mind: the text is a pleasure, written with wit, style and expertise. We recommend it to Luddites, old school business operators, anyone in entertainment or retail, and New Age Internet-based marketers (although you probably already know just how long this tail can be).

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