Customer Reviews for

The Man with the Red Tattoo

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2003

    The Man with the Gold Tattoo

    I am someone who HATES to read but when I was in Barnes & Noble I picked up this book and read the back and I was immediatly drawn to it. This being the first book of James Bond I've read I found it thrilling and exciting, I have seen all the movies and am proud to be called a James Bond freak and after reading this book I order 4 other works of Raymond Benson from this site, Zero Minus Ten, Never Dream of Dying, The Facts of Death & Doubleshot. and I have no doubt in my mind they will be just as good as The Man With the Red Tattoo. I can't wait to get these books and read them. Raymond Benson has done a great job and I hope to read more of his work soon.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2003

    Benson delivers another excellent Bond novel.

    In an era of contrived attempts to ¿personalize¿ Bond¿s missions or ¿peal back the layers¿ of Bond¿s psyche, it¿s refreshing to have a straightforward Bond-on-a-dangerous- assignment-in-an-exotic-locale adventure, and that¿s what Raymond Benson delivers in THE MAN WITH THE RED TATTOO, his best stand alone Bond thriller to date. This time, Mr. Bond, it ISN¿T personal. Halleluiah! Even the return of the Walther PPK seems to be Benson¿s way of saying, ¿Let¿s just use what has always worked and enough with the self-conscious `updating¿ of the character.¿ In this way I think RED TATTOO is well ahead of the curve, and just reinforces the fact that Benson is the best of all the post-Fleming Bond authors. But a straightforward plot doesn¿t mean RED TATTOO is lacking in character depth. Just the opposite is true. Japan holds dark memories for Bond, and that aspect is not ignored. Whereas John Gardner might have given a passing reference to Bond¿s legendary ordeal in YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE, Benson uses the ¿ghosts¿ of Bond¿s past as a full-fledged complication. Fans will not be disappointed in how Benson weaves elements of the Fleming masterpiece into this current book, nor will they be disappointed in the action. Gunfights and fistfights abound in RED TATTOO. It¿s probably Benson¿s most violent book to date¿the body count is quite high¿but this seems to be in keeping with the Asian action movie milieu the book frequently evokes. The methodology of the villain¿s master plan is ingenious and is the best conceived caper we¿ve had, book or film, in quite some time. And speaking of films, have I mentioned that RED TATTOO would make an amazing Bond movie? Well, it would. For the seasoned Bond fan THE MAN WITH THE RED TATTOO is the perfect book at the perfect time. For those who have yet to read a Benson book and are looking for a classic cocktail of Bondian action, suspense, and exotic locales, you would be well advised to start right here.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    superb Bond tale

    On a flight from Tokyo to England, passenger Kyoko McMahon becomes violently ill before dying. At about the same time near Tokyo, Kyoto¿s parents and her older sister also die. In England, the coroner believes that Kyoko died from a strand of West Nile disease, but only ten times deadlier than the normal strain. <P>James Bond attends the G8 summit in Japan to provide added protection to his country¿s leadership. He also investigates the deaths of the McMahon family, as the patriarch was a Scottish citizen and the CEO of a powerful pharmaceutical firm. Bond prefers not to return to Japan as he has bad memories though he appreciates the grace and beauty of the women. He soon works with his old friend Tiger Tanaka and agent Reiko Tamura in a race against a doomsday clock. Japanese Mafia Yami Shogun Goro Yoshida plots an end to western domination especially kicking America off his beloved nation¿s soil through a strand of virus that makes the deaths of the McMahon seem slow and gentle. <P>THE MAN WITH THE RED TATTOO is the best of the neo-Bond light tales. Raymond Benson returns Bond to what makes the character interesting to readers, yet humanizes 007 with his bad memories of Japan. The story line is quite exciting with global implications yet simplistic. The support cast is fun especially the return of Tiger and the villain who seems a lot like Bin Laden, as he wants the American presence off his beloved island nation. Mr. Benson makes a case that he is the heir to Mr. Fleming. <P>Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2002

    Benson delivers another excellent Bond novel.

    In an era of contrived attempts to ¿personalize¿ Bond¿s missions or ¿peal back the layers¿ of Bond¿s psyche, it¿s refreshing to have a straightforward Bond-on-a-dangerous-assignment-in-an- exotic-locale adventure, and that¿s what Raymond Benson delivers in THE MAN WITH THE RED TATTOO, his best stand alone Bond thriller to date. This time, Mr. Bond, it ISN'T personal. Thank Christ! Even the return of the Walther PPK seems to be Benson¿s way of saying, ¿Let¿s just use what has always worked and enough with the self-conscious `updating¿ of the character.¿ In this way I think RED TATTOO is well ahead of the curve. But that doesn¿t mean RED TATTOO is lacking in character depth. Quiet the opposite, in fact. Japan holds dark memories for Bond, and that aspect is not ignored. Whereas John Gardner might have given a passing reference to Bond¿s legendary ordeal in YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE, Benson uses the ¿ghosts¿ of Bond¿s past as a full-fledged complication. Fans will not be disappointed in how Benson weaves elements of the Fleming masterpiece into this current book, nor will they be disappointed in the action. Gunfights and fistfights abound in RED TATTOO. It¿s probably Benson¿s most violent book to date¿the body count is quite high¿but this seems to be in keeping with the Asian action movie milieu the book frequently evokes. The methodology of the villain¿s master plan is ingenious and is the best conceived caper we¿ve had, book or film, in quite some time. And speaking of films, have I mentioned that RED TATTOO would make an amazing Bond movie? Well, it would. For the seasoned Bond fan THE MAN WITH THE RED TATTOO is the perfect book at the perfect time. For those who have yet to read a Benson book and are looking for a classic cocktail of Bondian action, suspense, and exotic locales, you would be well advised to start right here.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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