Customer Reviews for

The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

Average Rating 3.5
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    An Informative Look At Information

    More than just an ancestry chart of how we use information technology, Tim Wu's account delves into the human psyche to demonstrate why certain types of information technology are more appealing than others, and further examines how communication methods correlate to the sociopolitical climates of the time. A good read for anyone interested in this topic in even the mildest manner.

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  • Posted June 19, 2011

    Highly recommended

    Everybody should read this. Excellently researched. Very well written. An expose of how Americans have been victims of censorship as bad as that of Hitler and Stalin through the collaboration of information suppliers forming monopolies and the FCC.

    He shows that the present free state of the Internet is threatened by the de facto monopolies of cable companies who own the broadband and fibre optic lines essential for the Internet. Also, since movies and television rely on cable access, the cable providers are poised to control them as well. This is not a fantasy or science fiction. It happened with the telephone, radio, and movies during the Studio Era, and it can happen again.

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  • Posted June 4, 2011

    Amazing parallels to tech today

    See how the lives of radio, TV and telephone pressage the PC, internet and social networks.

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    Posted May 22, 2011

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