Customer Reviews for

The Messenger

Average Rating 4.5
( 39 )
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(22)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Posted May 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE ENDINGS EVER!!

    I spent every spare moment of the last few days reading this book until it was finished. It was such a good book! At first I wasn't sure if I was going to like it, but the two characters quickly changed my mind and just kept drawing me in further and further. They were both so... different.

    Hannah Sunderland was so quaint saying her "thee's" instead of "you's" and so darn unabashedly straight-forward! I could really tell at the beginning of the book that she was a little lost, caught right smack dab in the middle-ground of "having no side" in the Revolutionary War because she was a Quaker. I could also tell when she went from just being what any Quaker maiden was "supposed" be... to living with her her own convictions, but all the while staying just as true to herself as she did to everyone else.

    And the hero, Jeremiah Jones... wow. He really had a ways to grow on me... which he did. Just as he slowly grew on Hannah. The love that slowly grew between them was just plain adorable. There weren't a ton of physical descriptions, or even much description at all since it was written from first person point of view when the reader is really only able to see what a particular character would be noticing.

    And not a single (real) kiss in the while thing!?! There were lots of "displays of affection" that only went as far as hugging (with one arm... so sweet!) and kisses on hair... And all this coming from a writer/reader (me, that is) who is madly obsessed with the romantic passion portrayed in all of Julie Lessman's books! But oh, did this book have passion! It was tie up in their love and in their beliefs and their duty to do what they could... no matter the cost. And it was just so subtle and reserved... so like Hannah and Jeremiah themselves. Which, as it turns out, was a very interesting twist, since Hannah and Jeremiah were polar opposite in every way possible besides this very important aspect.

    Siri Mitchell is an amazing writer. She does first person so well! But so differently than others may write it. Since I also write from first person point of view, I have a particular love-affair with it... especially when I see it so well done... the way Siri Mitchell always writes it. The Messenger was even half written from the hero's perspective... which I don't see often done. And I ended up I loving it.. a lot.

    This, put quite plainly, is one of the best books I've read in a very long time.

    My FAVORITE part of the book was one sentence in the second to last scene, on the second to last page. I'm not going to tell you what it is because I want it to perhaps hit you as it did me. Square in the chest. All I will tell you is that I think I'll probably be carrying around that one moment from this book for the rest of my life.

    Bethany House Publishers gave me a paperback copy of this book to review in exchange for my honest opinion of the book. I give Siri Mitchell's The Messenger 5 stars.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

    Love admist the Revolutionary war

    This is the second book bu Siri Mitchell that I have read. Hannah and Jeremiah had such in depth personalities. One chapter you may have thought you had figured it out but to turn around and it is something different. Siri writes from a unique histrical perspective that it is worth all the background information. It also makes us understand how families were divided between England and the Colonies. Worth it the entire way through til the end.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2012

    anonymous

    Great read. I really enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to everyone.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    What a story!

    Could not put it down!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    I really enjoyed this book. The story had a historical aspect a

    I really enjoyed this book. The story had a historical aspect and the characters really drew you in. I would recommend it to everyone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    So the Revolutionary War + British-occupied Philedelphia + Georg

    So the Revolutionary War + British-occupied Philedelphia + George Washington’s spies + a Quaker girl questioning her beliefs on non-violence = Amazing! As I’ve come to expect, Siri Mitchell once again takes Historical Romantic Suspense to new levels with The Messenger. Don’t miss this one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 30, 2014

    Couldn't put it down!

    And, I learned lots.

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  • Posted June 15, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Hannah is a Quaker. But when her twin brother joins the Colonial

    Hannah is a Quaker. But when her twin brother joins the Colonial cause she is torn between her love for her brother and her belief in not taking up arms. When her brother ends up in prison she goes against everything her faith and family has taught her to visit him.

    I enjoy books that take real historical events and weave a story around them. This is a thick book. But I was able to read it quickly, because the story flowed so smoothly. The author created a fascinating story that was not only enjoyable, but also informative. It had a intrigue, romance and inspiration. I'll definitely be checking out the author's other books.

    I received this book from Bethany House in exchange for my honest review.

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  • Posted June 13, 2012

    Highly Recommended.

    A fascinating book about colonial spies.

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  • Posted May 21, 2012

    The Messenger

    This was my firsgt Siri Mitchell book, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. The setting being during the Revolutionary War was interesting in itself. The author gave vivid details of the times and I was overwhelmed with what I learned about the war era.

    Hannah and Jeremiah were the two main characters we follow throughout this book. These two were an unusual pair, Hannah being a Quaker lady and Jeremiah being a war veteran who had been wounded. The task these two take on is dangerous because it involves helping prisoners of war escape, and Hannah made it even more dangerous by refusing to do things that would compromise her faith.

    Siri Mitchell created her character well, building their character throughout the book, drawing them to the reader in a unique way. The many twists and turns in the story captures the readers attention enough to want to keep on reading until the very end.
    I found the compromising situations the couple continually had to face intriguing and wanted to keep reading to see how they would handle the next issue they faced. This is a book well worth your read. I encourage you to consider grabbing a copy of The Messenger and read for your enjoyment.

    A copy of this book was provided by Bethany House for me to read and review. This review is my honest opinion of how I fee about the story.

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  • Posted May 7, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An excellent story of faith and personal conviction

    This book is based on actual historical events that occurred in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War. Even though I consider myself to be fairly well-educated about American history, it covers events and circumstances that I was totally unaware of. The author, Siri Mitchell, does an amazing job of bringing these long-ago events and people to life with wonderful descriptions.

    The Messenger does have a romance element to it, but the main story is about personal faith and conviction to act, no matter what the consequences. It makes you stop and consider what you would have done in similar circumstances and whether you would have had the courage to give up everything for a cause.

    If you're a fan of historical novels, I highly recommend that you take a look at this book.

    Disclosure: I received this book from Bethany House to review for myself. I was under no obligation to post a positive review and all opinions posted here are mine and mine alone.

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  • Posted May 2, 2012

    Although I enjoy reading historical fiction, I rarely select sto

    Although I enjoy reading historical fiction, I rarely select stories that take place during the Revolutionary War. Siri Mitchell's newest book, The Messenger, has me rethinking that stance. This book tells the tale of an unlikely duo who, despite their many differences, find themselves working together as spies. Hannah Sunderland is a Quaker woman who must go against her family and faith in order to assist her brother who has been placed in jail for his work among the Patriots. Jeremiah Jones is a wounded soldier who formally believed in and fought for the Loyalist cause, but now is left questioning the justice of the situation at hand. Through the story of these two characters, readers are encouraged to analyze their own thoughts regarding the importance of telling the truth, the importance of trusting in God's prompting, and the importance of working against injustice. Mitchell's writing style was very engaging and the development of the two main characters proved to be very thorough. I would certainly recommend this book to those interested.

    I was provided a copy of this book by Bethany House Publishers in exchange for my honest review. These opinions are entirely my own.

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  • Posted March 21, 2012

    Great, fast moving, breath holding historical read

    I rarely give 5 stars to a book, but Siri Mitchell did not disappoint with "The Messenger". This breath holding, fast moving story truly transported me to the Revolutionary War period. I'm not an expert of that time period, but felt Ms. Mitchell did a great job describing each scene in detail, allowing me to keep the pictures flowing in my head while I read. The main characters were wonderfully developed...even the people you wanted to dislike! Scriptural applications are clearly woven through the story. I especially loved the strength of character and convictions of the two main protagonists.

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  • Posted March 9, 2012

    The Messenger by Siri Mitchell is a suspenseful historical novel

    The Messenger by Siri Mitchell is a suspenseful historical novel with touches of Mitchell's trademark humor and wit. Hannah Sunderland has never questioned her family's Quaker faith until her twin brother, Robert, leaves it to join up with colonial rebels at the beginning of the Revolutionary War. The Quakers refused to take sides with either of the Tories or Patriots, marking them as traitors by both sides. When Robert is captured and placed in prison, Jeremiah Jones quickly seeks to use Hannah as a spy to get messages from General Washington into the prison. Jones who owns a tavern patronized by the King's troops, has built an identity as a loyal Tory with a good friend in General Howe's office, but he's really seething with anger and bitterness toward the British after losing his arm fighting for them years ago. Hannah and Jeremiah clash often as they try to save the prisoners dying inside from starvation and illness, their own personal philosophies seem so far apart, but the prisoners' fate draws them together, until Hannah begins to question the morality of the Quakers' refusal to help them. Mitchell, who started out writing Christian chick lit, manages to insert some lightness into this dark and tragic story. Jeremiah's frustration at a spy who refuses to lie is a delight to readers who know that the pair are meant to be together. But Mitchell also knows how to ratchet up the tension, bringing readers to a conclusion that will leave them gasping for breath. This isn't a genre I'm normally a fan of, but I love anything Mitchell writes, and she proves her capability as a writer by making this story truly compelling and enthralling, and she's done her research. As a Revolutionary War buff myself, my proverbial hat is off to her.

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  • Posted March 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    For me what signifies being a part of the story is the attention

    For me what signifies being a part of the story is the attention to detail. From the character develop to the way I can imagine simply being in the scene is what separates Siri Mitchell's novels apart from most. In her latest historical novel, The Messenger the reader is taken back to Philadelphia in 1778 at the height of the Revolutionary War where the British have now occupied the city. Here we find Hannah Sunderland and her family who are Quakers. Based on their religious beliefs, they will not take either side in the conflict, however when the Sunderland house is taken over by a British officer, they are informed that Hannah's twin brother has been imprisoned. She is torn between her religious beliefs to stay out of the war effort but she is determined to see her brother.

    Jeremiah Jones is a disgruntled veteran of the war fifteen years ago, losing an arm in the process, who has vowed to take revenge on the British soldiers. So now that his pub is under the occupation of the British, he finds that they are very willing to talk quite a bit over a few drinks. He learns that Washington wants to stage a prison breaks and he finds himself becoming an unlikely candidate for spying.

    Between Hannah and Jeremiah they each have different reasons for wanting to learn more about what is going on in the prison and Jeremiah tries to use Hannah to search for the information he needs to aid Washington, only the problem with Hannah is she isn't willing to lie and that could definitely become a problem. How they both will find a way to work together is what makes this novel a fantastic historical read while the reader is in for a bit of historical entertainment as they become part of the action.

    I received The Messenger by Siri Mitchell compliments of Christian Fiction Blog Alliance for my honest review. It definitely gives readers an idea of what life may have been like as people struggled with the war and for that reason, I rate this one a 4.5 out of 5 stars. It's a unique twist on your typical historical novel where a love story develops out of each person trying to gain and advantage to help the cause each is most loyal to. It is in this novel that two unlikely heroes will find the courage to act to help in the war.

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    Posted March 4, 2012

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