Customer Reviews for

The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice

Average Rating 3.5
( 37 )
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(16)

4 Star

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(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(13)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

Not a single point has been refuted.

The negative reviews posted here are typical of the reaction to this book. Outrage is expressed toward the heretic, without any specific refutation of any point. The book presents a clear and concise case that MT was a hypocrite and a fraud. The addition of further d...
The negative reviews posted here are typical of the reaction to this book. Outrage is expressed toward the heretic, without any specific refutation of any point. The book presents a clear and concise case that MT was a hypocrite and a fraud. The addition of further details of the woman's life and career would have improved the book, however.

posted by Anonymous on January 6, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

8 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

Mean spirited and miss-represents the truth about Mother Teresa and the Church

The person who wrote this book has more of an issue with the beliefs and religious practices of the Catholic Church and he is using Mother Teresa as a ploy to get his point across. I suggest that he actually seek why the Church teaches what it does instead of basing his...
The person who wrote this book has more of an issue with the beliefs and religious practices of the Catholic Church and he is using Mother Teresa as a ploy to get his point across. I suggest that he actually seek why the Church teaches what it does instead of basing his assumptions on silly notions that the church wants everyone to be unhappy wretches.

If you seek the truth you may actually discover it.

What I find ironic is that the author calls a woman who lived her life helping the sick and poor of India a fraud while he sits in a nice office with all the comforts of life writing books.

Is the author giving all his money he made on this book to the poor of India whom he claims was wronged by Mother Teresa?

posted by 2594264 on December 30, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2009

    Mean spirited and miss-represents the truth about Mother Teresa and the Church

    The person who wrote this book has more of an issue with the beliefs and religious practices of the Catholic Church and he is using Mother Teresa as a ploy to get his point across. I suggest that he actually seek why the Church teaches what it does instead of basing his assumptions on silly notions that the church wants everyone to be unhappy wretches.

    If you seek the truth you may actually discover it.

    What I find ironic is that the author calls a woman who lived her life helping the sick and poor of India a fraud while he sits in a nice office with all the comforts of life writing books.

    Is the author giving all his money he made on this book to the poor of India whom he claims was wronged by Mother Teresa?

    8 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2003

    GIVE ENOUGH MONKEYS....

    This ironically named author sorely tempts the Christian notion that God's love for humankind is unconditional as he spins his antipapist vitriol. It stops just short of the old bromides about tunnels between the convent and rectory. His writing suggests that he is on the Saul side of his journey to become St. Paul (like). Just one well placed lightning bolt and I think he could make it all the way over. His writing evokes the hopelessness of Himmler's Treblinka or Camus' The Fall. If you don't think there is enough pain, hate and anger in the world, this is your kind of read. For the rest of us, it is a reminder that the legacy of Mother Teresa-faith, hope and charity, is in all too short supply. Mother Teresa's actions honored the dignity of all God's people, including those with spiritual, moral and physical diseases. She was a true witness to Christ's journey and she personifies a life of faith and meaning. This book shines more light on its spiritually desolate author than his subject. Then again, that, and making a few bucks off trashing a decent human being, was likely the point of its publication. Amen

    5 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2006

    Poorly researched

    I was disappointed by this book, as it proports to be an in-depth exposé. However, it seems more opinion than sources and the author is at times almost juvenile in its approach.

    4 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2008

    A reviewer

    On page 11, Christopher Hitchens claims the following: Mother Teresa was ¿a religious fundamentalist,¿ ¿a political operative,¿ ¿a primitive sermonizer,¿ and ¿an accomplice of worldly, secular powers.¿ Four points, if Mr. Hitchens proves and communicates these points there should be no objection to giving him a star for each of the points validated. An extra star will be added if he proves all four. Christopher Eric Hitchens (1949-) is a well known atheist. He is well known not for the sole reason he is an atheist but because he is a missionary for atheism (see the quotes before the Foreward and Hitchens books). When authors write they communicate almost as much about themselves as they do the subject they are writing about (see his anti-Catholicism, pp. 28, 29, 32, 48, 51, 56, 60, 78, 84, 98). For that reason, Mr. Hitchens cannot divorce himself from his atheism when he writes anymore than this Catholic reviewer can in writing this review. For example, Hitchens claims that Mother Teresa¿s view on abortion and contraception was the first red flag for him (p. 24). Another example is his judgment of Mother Teresa with pejorative words, such as, ¿fundamentalist,¿ ¿operative,¿ ¿primitive,¿ and ¿accomplice.¿ Mr. Hitchens¿s atheism does not invalidate his critiques of Mother Teresa but it does beg the question ¿by what standard¿ does he use to determine the good, the true, and the beautiful outside the social conventions of the soceity for which he lives. It would be a lie to say most authors who write about Mother Teresa hold Mr. Hitchens¿s thesis. There are dozens of books promoting Mother Teresa in a positive light and only a couple that offer critiques of her person and mission. Even so, the impact of his book is vast. It is still a best seller 13 years after its publication and received a spike in sales since the release of Mother Teresa¿s private writings. It is the bible for anti-Mother Teresa crusaders and it is a popular work in the anti-theist movement. The first fifteen pages of the book is the Introduction (15% of the book). After indicting Mother Teresa for the company see keep (pp. 3ff), Mr. Hitchens critiques Malcolm Muggeridge for his, in Hitchens¿s opinion, misrepresentation of Calcutta (p. 21ff.). He questions the motives of Mother Teresa (p. 37). But he also claims she is an ¿instinctive genius¿ (p. 86). He believes her social work was not helping people but hurting them, he uses a doctor, among others, to make his claim (p. 38ff.). On pages 64-71, the Charles Keating Savings and Loan scandal is argued with photocopies of the letters of the court and Mother Teresa. Readers looking for a book bleeding with data and precise notes as to Mr. Hitchens¿s sources must seek elsewhere. There is a list of books Hitchens claimed to use as sources for the book (p. 12). He gives the criteria for his sources (p. 42). Most of his arguments are from circumstantial evidence or from those who claimed to have worked with or known Mother Teresa. Names are given but there are few written sources listed. One of his most important sources is an ex-Missionary of Charity, Susan Shields (p.43ff.). Hitchens¿s prime source is his claim that he met Mother Teresa in Calcutta (p. 23ff.). Many of the attacks on Mother Teresa are linked with the Church¿s doctrines which Mr. Hitchens is rather ignorant of, or distorting (p. 52ff, 77, 88n). Though, there is one time when he praises the Catholic Church for its defense of ¿potential life¿ (p. 52). Mr. Hitchens is well know for his dexterity in the use of the English language, and in this he does not disappoint in his use of high but non-technical English. However, his language is loose on understanding the facts of his subject and the sensitivity of the issue (pp. 21, 56-57). Unfortunately for Hitchens, his words are a two-edge sword cutting him every time he swings a sharp word at Mother Teresa. On page 56, Hitchens speaks of the ¿myth of Christ¿s conception.¿ He seems to be constantly drawn to th

    3 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2003

    Extremely distasteful

    He writes with extreme bitterness and cynicism. I don't know much about Mother Theresa, but I do know that he attacks her with a ferocity that is unbecoming of anyone -- religious or not.

    3 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2003

    Not worth it, even if it were free.

    The title tells us that the author will present a good theological missionary position -- It does not, an in no way is CH at theologian. It seems as if the book is completely his (negative) opinion. He writes books like Stephen King does (a lot of them), but at least Stephen King realizes he is dealing in non-reality and actually does put out good books (Unlike CH).

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2003

    Pathetic, Pathetic, Pathetic!

    I had to choose one star, because there wasn't a '0' star option. How dare Mr. Hutchins write such an obviously devious book. With no proof of any of his claims, he ironically becomes what he's claiming Mother Teresa to be--a fraud. Please Mr. Hutchins, you are not any authority to speak on matters which you obviously know nothing about. Mr. Hutchins' transparent thirst for attacking anything Catholic is obvious in this book. And I am not amused by your choice of title.

    2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2003

    An Acrid Attack on an Icon of Hope

    How dare this man attack Mother Theresa! A Nobel Peace prize winner and a true advocate against poverty, she never was a propagandist; I also agree that the author should get his head out of his butt and maybe realize the accomplishments of MT.

    1 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2003

    I WOULDNT LOOSE MY TIME READING IT

    Please tell this author that his book will not take away for a minute what millions think of Mother Therese. I hope he can do more research about her , do a little of what she did. I like american writers but this is flooding with bitterness.

    1 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2014

    Misleading

    This book is poorly researched and misleading...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2003

    What have you done to help the poor ?

    What have you done to help the poor ? At least she tried MT spent all her life helping others let's no judge, instead let's try to help also.Stat by helping some one in your family, or just simply smiling at people it mey help them in a sad day.

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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