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Customer Reviews for

The Oak Leaves

Average Rating 4.5
( 90 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2007

    Love Is Stronger Than Fear

    With her book The Oak Leaves, Maureen writes a compelling tale that most women can relate to. We're nurturers. We want children. Healthy children who will one day give us healthy grandchildren. I know a family who had a daughter who was deaf. Everyone but the parents knew it for years before they had her tested and got her hearing aids. One of my son's didn't talk until he was three. He was my fourth child so I didn't think anything about it until his grandfather started worrying about it. So I understand when Maureen's character Talie denys that her precious son, Ben is anything but just a little slow. I understand how she wants to protect Ben, her husband and herself from reality as long as she can. And when she reads her ancestor's diary and learns about the Kennesy legacy, she can deny the truth no longer, I understand why she wants to protect her sister from the Kennesey 'curse.' The story leads us though the present day with Talie and takes us back to 1849 as she reads Cosima's journal, making this a parallel story. Cosima wisely writes '. . .love is stronger than fear.' This, I believe is the message Maureen would like us to take with us as we finish reading this inspiring book.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2007

    When The Past Teaches YOur Present

    Oak Leaves By: Maureen Lang This story is as beautiful as the rich gold of oak leaves on an autumn tree. This book is almost like two in one. Maureen mastered the art of telling family history within a modern story in such a way that made all characters, both present and past real. Talie Ingram found a family treasure, the journal of her great-great grandmother. She discovered within the pages a history of her family. As she began her journey into the past her heart thrilled at the chance to find out about her Irish heritage. But the joy was short-lived. Within the pages she discovered a sad family history which unraveled the very fabric of her life. She and Luke had the perfect marriage and a beautiful son and another baby on the way. But what she read within her ancestor Cosima Escott¿s journal threatened to destroy her world. Was it possible that she passed the frightening genetics to her children? Maureen Lang has written a story from her heart directly to yours. It is written to the place in every heart that looks to God with doubt and frustration when life does not go as planned or expected. And within this story that crosses generations and enters its precious message into the reader¿s heart that with God we can grow through all and whatever comes our way. Chandra Lynn Smith

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2007

    A reviewer

    In a clever flip-flop of storyline, Maureen Lang has effectively demonstrated the concerns and fears that face this generation are not new nor without a champion for our cause. The reader is shown Cosima¿s story through the eyes of Talie Ingram, whose idyllic life is shattered with the growing realization that her beautiful toddler son may have a developmental disability. And as the reader is drawn into Cosima¿s story, that of Talie¿s nineteenth century ancestor, the reader begins to identify with Talie¿s growing horror that her son is developmentally delayed. The author herself has a child with fragile X syndrome, a debilitating condition affecting the developing child and causing mental impairment resembling autism. And it is this personal experience that gives the book a feel of authenticity. The condition is passed on through the mother¿s gene. Each child conceived by the carrier has a fifty-fifty percent chance of having fragile X syndrome. The story educates the reader sans medical jargon and terminology, simply drawing the reader into the lives of these two women. Each must overcome the fear of conception and the risks to the unborn child. Each must learn to trust in God¿s purpose and design even in the face of such disappointment. This book gives the reader a double header both in contemporary and historical flavor. Maureen Lang has woven a powerful story and demonstrates her skill, not only as an expert storyteller, but as a student of the human condition. She is to be applauded for her willingness to draw from her own pain and suffering to provide the reader with such a warm portrait of this affliction. I highly recommend this read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    poignant tale from Ms. Lang's soul to ours

    Talie Ingram finds her great-great-grandmother¿s journal written in the 1800s. Initially fascinated by her find, she begins to read the entries until she comes across an item that frightens her. She realizes what her ancestor called 'feeble-minded' that ran in the family is actually a genetic disorder. --- Overwhelmed and frightened that she, her daughter and her sisters might have Fragile X Syndrome, she wants to throw away the ledger without finishing it. However, for the sake of her child and to inform her sister in an intelligent manner, she must find courage to learn more from the journal and other sources including God. --- This is a deep family drama that focuses on Fragile X Syndrome and its impact on people. This reviewer never heard of this particular genetic condition until Maureen Lang¿s powerful character study that grips the audience from the moment that Talie begins to understand her family Victorian Era history and its implications today. Empathy will go out to her as she struggles with accepting a terrifying prognosis that her son has this condition while wondering why God allows bad things to happen to good people. Extremely deep and haunting, Ms. Lang provides a tale from her soul to ours. --- Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Warriors

    Cut it out with the warriors stuff please im looking for the Actual reviews not warriors. Question about the actaul nook not warriors: Is this book good?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Loved it!

    Spoke tome several times.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    Excellent!

    I had no idea what "Oak Leaves" was about when I began reading it. I haven't read such a moving book in such a long time. I look forward to when the Lord will put someone in my life going through a similar situation so I can share this book with them. After having read it, I believe I received a very special gift from the author's heart. Thank you, Maureen.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Goldblaze

    She spys the rabbit scrunches down waiting...waiting. then she pounces scaring the ravit into a dead run she chases after it and catches up lands on it slitting its throat. She brings it back to result two.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    Nvm

    This book looks good.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    To oaktail

    Where is the part four

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Seedpelt

    I will go get help from skyclan *runs to get med cat*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Everpaw

    Oh dogs

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    That is a different horseclan

    Yur clan with Servaljump is at silver dolphin. May starclan light your path...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Owlfeather

    It seems that lilystars days are numbered and whites and tails will kill her. I wonder who they are.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2012

    Oaktail

    Part one: Story result fifteen Part two: Wicked result six or five

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    Very moving!

    I found myself eager to get home from work to read more! A beautiful story of courage, faith, and love!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    Very good book

    ****good book

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  • Posted October 24, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    I loved this book - a great read, I fell in love with this family and learned something in this book

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  • Posted October 20, 2011

    Loved this book

    This is a rich story of two worlds, parted by 150 years. Intertwined by a family secret, a family journal and a faith in God. Not often spoke of 150 years ago the Fragile X Syndrome or as we say today the Special Needs children, two women find their lives changed by the family secret. Both women experience a great many feelings, fear, love, grace and their faith. I couldn't put this book down Hated it when I had to recharge my nook. Very inspirational.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2011

    Awesome

    I have not read for several years. Well not for fun. I just recently got nook on my smart phone. I loved this book so much, I thought to my self why did I ever stop reading. I soon started rearranging my schedule just so I would have more time to read.

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