Customer Reviews for

The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War

Average Rating 3.5
( 45 )
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5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(10)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Excellent And accurate A must reaf A must read !

Matches my 30 years of research from first edition sources at the time prior, during, and immediately after the war of northern aggression!

posted by Anonymous on September 13, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

11 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

A polemic, not history

This book does not deserve even one star. Although it purports to be history, it is a grotesque distortion of the historical record. For example, DiLorenzo quotes primary source material which impugns Lincoln's motives. If you are not a historian and are unfamiliar with...
This book does not deserve even one star. Although it purports to be history, it is a grotesque distortion of the historical record. For example, DiLorenzo quotes primary source material which impugns Lincoln's motives. If you are not a historian and are unfamiliar with the sources, you would likely accept the conclusions that the author draws from the quotes he cites. However, if you take the time to check the sources, you find that DiLorenzo has lifted phrases out of context, and even attributed words to one person that were clearly uttered by another. It is clear that this book was written with one aim in mind: to 'prove' that Lincoln was a tyrant who started the Civil War in order to impose Whiggish economic policies on the South. Lacking proof, DiLorenzo is not above deliberate distortion and misinformation. In short, beware of 'history' written by those who have a political or economic axe to grind.

posted by Anonymous on April 29, 2006

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2005

    Not very good!

    Dr. Dilorenzo's work is the perfect example of suspect historical scholarship. His agenda is clear, which leads to his cherry-picking, and distorting, the record to support this agenda. The first thing one learns in a historiography class is not to do what Dr. Dilorenzo has done. It is a disappointing work.

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2006

    Historical Inaccuracies

    While in general agreement with Professor DiLorenzo¿s assessment that Lincoln was a ruthless conniving politician who never let such small details as the truth and the Constitution stand in his way, there are numerous historical inaccuracies that make one wonder if DiLorenzo¿s comment on page 263 directed toward Gary Gallagher concerning ¿shoddy scholarship¿ does not apply equally to this work. For example: Pg 178: ¿After suffering repeated battlefield defeats in the Shenandoah Valley at the hands to Confederate General Thomas ¿Stonewall¿Jackonhs, Union General John Pope¿.¿ Jackson¿s opponents in the Valley campaign of 1962 were Union Generals Banks, Milroy, and Fremont. Jackson and Pope met only at the confederate victory of 2nd Manassas. Pg 226: speaking of General Grant ¿¿including former Confederate General James Longstreet, whom he appointed federal railroad commissioner¿¿ On March 10. 1869 Grant nominated Longstreet to the position of Surveyor of Customs for the port on New Orleans not railroad commissioner. Also on pg 226 ¿It was Longstreet who introduced Grant to his future wife, Longstreet¿s cousin.¿ While Grant and Longstreet were very close friend, Grant met his wife, Julia, through her brother Frederic Dent, who was Grant¿s roommate during his final year at West Point.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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